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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

Received Your Orange Pi One Board? You’ll Need to Tweak Your FEX File / script.bin

February 13th, 2016 1 comment

Orange Pi One is arguably the cheapest ARM Linux development board with networking available today for $9.99 plus shipping. It is very similar to Orange Pi PC with an Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex A7 processor, Ethernet, and HDMI, but has less memory as it comes with 512MB RAM instead of 1GB, and comes with a few less features too. The bad news is that Shenzhen Xunlong did not release any new firmware for Orange Pi One so far, but the good news is that Orange Pi PC firmware files work on Orange Pi One board.

Click to Enlarge

Orange Pi One (Click to Enlarge)

However, there’s an important hardware modification between Orange Pi PC and Orange Pi One, as SY8106A voltage regulator used in the former is controlled via I2C, while the former as a simpler SY8113B adjustable through GPIO, so thermal throttling wont work by default, and you’ll get plenty of error messages in the log that look like:

So Thomas, a developer and member of sunxi-linux community, looked into it and found that all you needed to do what to modify cooler_table and dvfs_table sections in the FEX file used to configure the hardware based on Allwinner processors:

So the new and lower cost PMIC only supports 1.1 and 1.3V which will let the processor run up to 648 MHz and 1.2 GHz respectively. The chart below shows the number of active CPUs, CPU voltage and CPU frequency (right scale), CPU usage in percent and SoC temperature (left scale) over about 20 minutes. In the first part the system is made to switch between , and after sysbench and cpuburn-a7 utility running, and showing how the system decreases the frequency, then voltage, then number of cores used as the temperature gets to close to 90 C.

Orange_Pi_One_CPU_Frequency_Voltage_Chart

If you just want something that works, you’ll just need to replace script.bin in the FAT partition of the SD card after you flash the firmware. I don’t own have the board to test, but I created Orange Pi One FEX file from the Orange Pi PC, and generated the corresponding script.bin, which you need to rename and copy to your bootable SD card.  This will most probably soon be included in the latest community firmware releases. You can experiment with FEX files (text) and script.bin (resulting binary) using sunxi-tools in Linux.

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Two Contests for Makers with BeagleBone Green (ARM) and Creator CI20 (MIPS) Boards

February 12th, 2016 2 comments

I’ve noticed Hackster hardware community has helped organizing several challenges for makers, and the most two recent one are sponsored by Imagination Technologies with their Creator CI20 MIPS board, and SeeedStudio and Beagleboard.org with BeagleBone Green board.

“Terminate the competition with Creator Ci20!”

Creator_CI40_BoardThat’s the title for Imagination Technologies contest, who basically wants you to create our robot overloads using their MIPS board, or at least design a Terminator inspired robot or hack using the board.

You’ll need to submit your idea by March 4, 2016, and the company will give 50 Creator Ci20 to the best 50 ideas, aftwer which you have until April 29, 2016 to complete your project, and write about it on Hackster with photos, code and schematics. Three winners will be selected by May 6, 2016 to get one of the three prizes:

  • 1st place (worth $400) – A bag of Imagination-powered goodies, including a Meizu MX5 smartphone, the upcoming Creator Ci40 development board, and other accessories and add-on boards from MikroEletronika
  • 2nd place (worth $200) – A Securifi Almond router and a Creator Ci40 board
  • 3rd place (worth $150) – A chipKIT Wi-FIRE development board and a Creator Ci40 board

BeagleBone Green (BBG) Contest

BeagleBone_GreenThere’s no particular theme for this contest, and the organizers simply ask you to submit any idea using BBG by February 22, 2016, where 20 contestants will win a BBG board each, and 100 more get a 20% discount coupon valid on SeeedStudio. Winners of the pre-contest will be announced on February 27. You’ll then have until March 31 to submit your complete project with hardware design files, source code, and pictures, and 3 winners will be selected by April 2. The three prizes will take you to Shenzhen Maker Faire:

  • 1st place – Paid Trip to Maker Faire Shenzhen 2016 ($3,000) + $900 SeeedStudio Store coupon + Designed for Manufacturing Review
  • 2nd place – Paid Trip to Maker Faire Shenzhen 2016 ($3,000) + $400 SeeedStudio Store coupon + Designed for Manufacturing Review
  • 3rd place – Paid Trip to Maker Faire Shenzhen ($3,000) + $200 SeeedStudio Store coupon + Designed for Manufacturing Review

I could not find the exact dates for Shenzhen Maker Faire 2016, but last year it took place on June 19 to 21.

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Crowdfunded Projects Use Raspberry Pi and ODROID Boards into Home Theater PCs and Retro Game Consoles

February 12th, 2016 1 comment

I’ve been tipped about two separate projects launched on Indiegogo and Kickstarter that integrate Raspberry Pi or ODROID boards into their products. indieGO! retro gaming console and distribution leverages Raspberry Pi 2, ODROID-C1+, or ODROID-XU4 to play older games, while Pi2Media HT1 relies on either Raspberry Pi2, and later the upcoming UP Board or ODROID-C2 boards in order to offer a Surround 7.1 Home Theater PC.

indieGO! Retro Game Console

indieGO!Beside the development board, indieGo! also includes a DVD-RW drive, an SD card reader, a mini-ITX case, a 3D-Printed I/O-shield and ARM board holder, a USB joypad, and two USB ports.

indieGO!-OS is also a Linux distribution based on AEROS running Exagear which means both ARM (native) and x86 (emulation) executables will run on the device. Pre-isntalled programs include Wine, Kodi, Moonlight, AmiCloud, and EmuLA. The many emulators installed allow support for games running Playstation, C64, Dreamcast, Game Boy, Atari, Sega, PC, etc..

Raspberry_Pi_ODROID_Game_EmulatorEmulators highlighted in Orange will run with lag, so for a better experience, you’d have to select ODROID-XU4.

indieGO! project is currently on Kickstarter with less than 48 hours to go, and fully funded with over 60,000 Euros. If you don’t need the hardware, but would like to run the distribution on your development board, you can pledge 25 or 29 Euros to get a download link to indieGO!-OS for respectively Raspberry Pi 2, or ODROID boards. A 99 Euros pledge will get your the OS, and the complete hardware minus the board, and if you want a complete system, you’ll need 149 Euros + shipping for a Raspberry Pi 2 system, or 199 Euros for the version with ODROID-XU4 board. Delivery is scheduled for June 2016.

Pi2Media HT1 – Surround Sound Home Theater PC

Pi2Media_HT1

Pi2Design has designed expansion boards for Raspberry Pi and other development boards in the past such as CSB502SSD add-on board adding support for SSD, WiFi and an RTC to the popular board, and they mostly rely on two of their existing add-on boards with Pi2Media HT1 home theater PC which will feature:

  • Raspberry Pi 2 board
  • 502SSD Shield adding 2x USB port, mSATA socket up to 1TB, WiFi, RTC, a temperature sensor, and power circuitry
  • 502V2S Shield with:
    • ADV7623 HDMI 1.4 Transceiver takes the RPi 2 HDMI output and passes it through while extracting the 8-Channels of 24-Bit, 96Khz/192Khz audio
    • Digital audio – 24-bit, 96Khz/192Khz 5.1 Compressed Digital Stream (Dolby Digital AC3 and DTS 5.1) via Optical TOSLink (S/PDIF) connector
    • Analog audio – 24-Bit, 96Khz/192Khz Analog Audio Out using four PCM5102A DACs via 3.5mm Jack
    • 16-Pin Header provides access to the I2S bus along with I2C and control
  • A 32GB (Streaming Edition), 250GB (Deluxe Edition) or 500GB (Server Edition) Solid State Drive
  • A 8GB Micro-SD Card with NOOBS, set to boot OSMC from SSD
  • A Basic IR Remote Control
  • 12V@5A power supply with 100~240V @ 50/60Hz input
  • Micro USB to USB-A patch cable
  • 3 Meter HDMI 1.4a Cable
  • Getting Started Instructions
  • 1 Year Warranty with unlimited email technical support

Raspberry_Pi_2_Home_Theater_PC

The device will be pre-loaded with Open Source Media Center (OSMC), but you can of course run other Linux distributions available for Raspberry Pi 2.

Pi2Media HT1 has recently been launched on Indiegogo (flexible funding), where the company aims to raise $30,000. If you already own a Raspberry Pi 2, you can get all remaining hardware by pledging $179 for the DIY Bundle 2 kit with the two add-on boards, aluminum enclosure, the power supply, and all necessary cables and mountings. A complete Pi2Media HT1 with a 32GB goes for $249, while you’re being asking for $439 the version with a 500 GB SSD. Shipping is included, and delivery is scheduled for May 2016.

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LoPy Tiny IoT Developer Board Runs MicroPython, Supports LoRa, WiFi and Bluetooth (Crowdfunding)

February 10th, 2016 8 comments

Pycom launched WiPy last year, a WiFi IoT board based on Texas Instruments CC3200 ARM Cortex M4 SoC, and a few months after sending rewards to their Kickstarter backers, they are back on the crowdfunding platform to launch LoPy, another IoT development board that runs MicroPython and offers LoRa, WiFi and Bluetooth LE connectivity.

LoPy Boards, WiPy Board, and Pycom baseboard

LoPy Boards, WiPy Board, and LoPy Expansion Board

LoPy board hardware specifications:

  • SoC – Dual processor @ 160 MHz with WiFi & BLE radio with 400 kB RAM, 1MB flash
  • External Storage – 4MB flash
  • Connectivity
    • 802. 11b/g/n @ 16Mbps with WEP, WPA/WPA2 WiFi security; SSL/TLS support; AES encryption engine.
    • Bluetooth Classic and Low Energy
    • LoRaWAN
      • Semtech LoRa transceiver SX1272 @ 868 MHz (Europe) or 915 MHz (North America).
      • Range – Node: Up to 40km; Nano-Gateway: Up to 5 km
      • Nano Gateway Capacity – Up to 100 nodes.
    • Internal chip antenna and u.fl connectors for external antennas
  • Headers – 2x 14-pin headers for:
    • Up to 24 GPIOs (3.3V tolerant)
    • 2x UART, SPI, I2C
    • DMA, I2S
    • 12-bit ADC and 8-bit DAC.
    • 16-bit and 32-bit timers with PWM.
  • Hash and encryption engines – SHA, MD5, DES, AES
  • Misc – RTC
  • Power Supply – 3.3V to 5.5V
  • Power Consumption
    • Wi-Fi:12 mA in active mode, 5uA in standby
    • LoRa: 3mA in active mode, 39mA during Tx, 14mA during Rx
    • BLE: 8mA in active mode, 2uA in standby.
  • Dimensions – 55mm x 20mm
  • Certifications – EMC, CE, FCC, LoRaWAN

They did not disclose the wireless SoC name, but the specifications look very similar to Espressif ESP32, and ESP8266 should get a proper MicroPython port soon, so at first I thought they could have decided to go with ESP32, even though it’s probably premature even for a Kickstarter project. However, WiFi is said to be limited to 16 Mbps,  one of the pictures indicates a “Cortex-M4 WiFi” is used, and somebody asked whether the chip was ESP32, and they answered that “due to NDA restrictions we can’t give more details about the SoC at this moment”, so it could be also a new Texas Instruments SimpleLink CC3x part with WiFi and Bluetooth. So we’ll have to wait to find out.

LoPy Kit with IP64 enclosure, LoPy Board, antenna, and battery

LoPy Kit with IP64 enclosure, LoPy Board, antenna, and battery (Not available in the Kickstarter campaign, but later).

The board also supports Blynk libraries, can be programmed with Pymakr IDE, and is Microsoft Azure ready. Arduino IDE support is planned as a stretch goal. LoPy can be used as a LoRa node, and as LoRa gateway with up to 100 nodes, so you could easily build your own little IoT network.

LoPy expansion board allows easier development with a USB to serial converter, 3 Female headers, compatible with both LoPy and WiPy board, a LiPo battery charger with JST connector, a microSD card socket, user LED and push button, and various jumpers to enable/disable features. You’ll probably want to include the antenna kit as well, unless you have your own, as it’s not included in the standard pledges.

Setting up a LoRa Connection in Python

Setting up a LoRa Connection in Python

The company has already raised over 58,000 Euros out of their 50,000 Euros target so the project will go ahead. All early bird rewards are gone, but you can still pledge 29 Euros to get a LoPy board, and most will probably want to add 5 Euros to get the LoRa antenna kit too, or simply pledge 48 Euros to get a complete kit with the board, the antenna, and the expansion board. Shipping adds 7 Euros, and delivery is scheduled for August 2016.

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Cypress Introduces PSoC 4 L-Series ARM Cortex-M0 MCU and Development Kit

February 9th, 2016 No comments

Cypress Semiconductor has recently unveiled PSoC 4 L-Series micro-controller family based on ARM Cortex M0 core with more programmable analog and digital blocks, expanded memory, new peripherals and higher number of I/Os, as well as the corresponding Arduino compatible CY8CKIT-046 PSoC 4 L-Series Pioneer Kit to evaluate their latest solution.

PSoC 4200L Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

PSoC 4200L Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Key features of PSoC 4 L-Series MCU

  • ARM Cortex-M0 CPU @ 48-MHz with DMA controller, up to 256KB flash, up to 32KB SRAM and  up to 98 GPIOs
  • CapSense with SmartSense auto-tunning2x Cypress Capacitive Sigma-Delta (CSD) blocks
  • Programmable analog
    • 4x configurable opamps
    • 4x current DACs (IDACs)
    • 2x low-power comparators (CMP)
    • One 12-bit, 1-Msps SAR ADC
  • Programmable digital
    • 8x Universal Digital Blocks (UDBs)
    • 8x configurable 16-bit TCPWM
    • 4x independent serial communication blocks (SCBs)
  • Full-Speed USB 2.0 controller
  • 2x CAN Controllers
  • Segment LCD Drive support up to a maximum of 64 output (commons or segments)
  • Power
    • 1.71 to 5.5 V Operation
    • 20-nA Stop Mode with GPIO pin wakeup
    • Hibernate and Deep Sleep modes allow wakeup-time versus power trade-offs
  • Packages48-pin TQFP, 64-pin TQFP, 68-pin QFN, 124-pin μBGA

PSoC 4 L series micro-controller are programmed with Cypress PSoC Creator IDE running on Windows only, several getting started guides can be downloaded, and you may join Cypress Developer Community for support.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The quickest way to get started or/and evaluation the new MCU is to get CY8CKIT-046 PSoC 4 L-Series Pioneer Kit with PSoC 4 L-Series pioneer board, a USB standard-A to Mini-B cable,  4 jumper wires, 2 proximity sensor wires, a stereo audio earphone with microphone, and a Quick Start Guide.

Pioneer board specifications:

  • MCU – PSoC 4200L (CY8C4248BZI-L489) Cortex M0 @ 48 MHz with 256KB flash and 32KB RAM
  • Storage – 1 Mbit Cypress F-RAM (FM24V10G) + footprint for micro SD slot or serial NOR flash
  • Wireless Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.1 LE via footprint for EZ-BLE PRoC module (CYBLE-022001-00)
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector, 1x KitProg USB connector
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack
  • Debugging
    • PSoC 5LP programmer and debugger chip
    • PSoC 5LP I/O header (2x 8-pin)
    • PSoC 4200L program and debug header
  • Expansion Headers
    • Arduino compatible headers on main board (left)
    • Arduino compatible headers on shield board (right)
    • Digilent Pmod compatible I/O header
    • Character LCD header
    • 2x CapSense proximity headers
    • EZ-BLE I/O header
  • Misc – Current measurement jumper, reset and user buttons, RGB LED, status LEDs, CapSense Gesture pad
  • Power
    • 5V via micro USB port
    • Footprint for Cypress Energy Harvesting PMIC (S6AE101A)
  • Dimensions – N/A

You can get extensive hardware and software documentation, as well as purchase the devkit for $49 on PSoC 4 L-Series Pioneer Kit product page.

PSoC 4 L-Series MCUs are currently sampling with production expected this quarter. More details can be found on PSoC 4 L-Series page.

Via EDN Europe

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Wandboard Introduces $69 Hobbitboard Made for Brillo Powered by NXP i.MX6 UltraLite Processor

February 9th, 2016 7 comments

Wandboard was one of the first to launch boards based on Freescale i.MX6 Solo, Dual and Quad in early 2013. The boards are comprise of an EDM system-on-module and a carrierboard, that makes it not only suitable as a single board computer, but you could also use the boards to start developing software, while making your own carrierboard to match your application. Wandboard.org community sent me an email last night to let me know about their latest board called Hobbitboard, or in full “Hobbitboard Made for Brillo”, powered by NXP i.MX6 UltraLite Cortex A7 processor, which follows the same principle, and includes Hobbit Compute Module and Hobbit I/O Carrierboard.

Hobbit Compute Module

Hobbit Compute Module

Hobbit Compute Module specifications:

  • SoC – NXP i.MX6 UltraLite Cortex A7 processor @ 528 MHz
  • System Memory – 256MB DDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11ac WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 (Ampak AP6335)
  • Board Connectors – Two Pico Expansion header and one Intel Editon compatible headers
  • Power Management – NXP PF300
  • Dimensions – 40 x 36 mm

If the design look familiar, especially with the Intel Edison compatible design, it’s because Hobbit Compute Module appears to be a variation of TechNexion PICO-iMX6 System-on-Module with the new NXP, previously Freescale, i.MX 6UltraLite processor and less RAM, and even a closer variation of the new PICO-IMX6UL SoM, also used for Brillo.

Hobbit I/O Carrierboard

Hobbit I/O Carrierboard

To get started with development easily, Wandboard also designed Hobbit I/O Carrierboard with the following specifications:

  • SoM Connectors – 2x Pico header and 1x Edison compatible header
  • Connectivity – Ethernet port (RJ45)
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x USB type C port
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio In/Out jack
  • Expansion Headers
    • Two 8-pin headers with UART, I2C, GPIO and SPI signals (2.54mm pitch)
    • Four 2×10-pin headers with TTl, I2C, GPIo and SPI signals
  • Power Supply – 5V via power barrel
  • Dimensions – 100 x 45mm

As the name implies, the board has been made to run Google’s Brillo operating system for the Internet of Things, and targets applications such as home automation, drones, 3D printer, climate control, robot or remote sensor network, and more.

Hobbitboard can be pre-ordered on ARMKits for $69, and it’s also listed on AVNET for $90.04 and DigiKey for $81.24, with shipping scheduled for the end of March. The code name for the board is HOBBIT6UL-BRILLO, which implied there could also be another version later on. Documentation is currently limited, but should be shortly available on Hobbitboard Brillo product page.

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$98 Geek Force Mediatek MT7623 Router Board Features 6 GbE Ports, 3 mPCIe Slots for WiFi, 3G, or LTE (Crowdfunding)

February 8th, 2016 18 comments

We’ve seen a few interesting and relatively powerful router board launched last year, with the likes of MQMaker WiTi or Turris Omnia, AsiaRF has now designed Geek Force board powered by Mediatek MT7623N/MT7623A quad core network processor combined with 2GB RAM, six Gigabit Ethernet ports, and optional 802.11ac and 3G connectivity via the three mPCIe slots available on the board. The board also features two HDMI ports, and supports multimedia capabilities such as H.264, MPEG-2, or VC-1 hardware video decoding.

Geek_Force_Board

Click to Enlarge

Geek Force board preliminary specifications:

  • SoC – MediaTek MT7623A or MT7623N quad-core ARM Cotex-A7 @ 1.3GHz with Mali-450MP GPU (MT7623N only)
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 2GB eMMC or NAND Flash + SD card slot up to 128 GB, and maybe SATA via the mPCIe slots
  • Connectivity – 6 Gigabit Ethernet ports (WAN / LAN behavior defined by firmware), 802.11 b/g/n WiFi & Bluetooth 4.0 via MT6625L with IPEX antenna connector for WiFi and Bluetooth, and optional 802.11ac WiFi and/or 3G via mPCIe slots.
  • Video – 2x HDMI, 1x RCA video, MIPI DSI
  • Audio – HDMI, and optical S/PDIF input and output ports
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x USB 2.0 host port, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion
    • 3x mini PCIe
    • 26-pin “Raspberry Pi” header,
    • 10-pin PCM header
    • 10-pin SPI0 header
    • 6-pin Apple Auth CP (I2C) connector
    • 10-pin I2C + I2S header
    • Power header
  • Debugging – 1x 20-pin JTAG connector, 4-pin UART1 connector for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver, power switch, 1x user switch
  • Power – 12V
  • Dimensions – N/A

The board will support OpenWrt, Android, and Ubuntu Snappy operating systems, likely on top of Linux 3.10 kernel. The SoC also features hardware NAT, hardware QoS, and hard crypto engine, which should all be supported by the board. While the specs indicates either MT7623A or M7623N processor might be used, the pictures shows MT7623N used in combination with MT7530B Ethernet switch. MT7623A embeds the Ethernet switch on-chip, but lacks a GPU, and has less video interfaces.

Geek_Force_Board_BottomApart from the specifications however, the company has not shared much technical information so far, not shown any demos, but I’ve been told a video should come after Chinese New Year holidays. Some parts of the specs are also unclear, for example whether the video interfaces are only output, or if some are input, and it’s not 100% clear the mPCIe slots also support SATA.Potential applications include Internet router, enterprise access point, home security system, home automation gateway, NAS, switch control processor, etc…

AsiaRF has launched a flexible funding Indiegogo campaign to raise funds for production. A $98 pledge should get you a Geek Force board with a power adapter and a “pigtail plus” antenna. There are also various other rewards for 802.11ac, 3G or 4G LTE mini PCie cards add-ons, up to $192 for a Geek Force board with 4G LTE worldwide, and 802.11ac WiFi. Shipping added $30 to the destinations I tried, and delivery is scheduled for June 2016.

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How to Use Your Old Laptop Screen with Raspberry Pi or Your Computer

February 5th, 2016 11 comments

After reading an article on Liliputing about using Raspberry Pi Zero with Motorola Lapdock, I decided to look for clones for the device since Motorola Lapdock is now hard to buy at a decent price, if at all, since the product has been discontinued for a while. I did not find anything similar, but instead I came across M.NT68676.2A LCD driver HDMI kit selling for $37.99 on eBay that allows you to re-use your old laptop screen with any development board or computer that comes with HDMI, DVI, or VGA output.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The kit is comprised of a monitor control board (M.NT68676.2A), an “inverter” board which depends on your LCD panel model number, a keypad board, an LVDS cable, and a cable to connect all three boards together.

M.NT68676.2A monitor control board specifications:

  • Chipset –  NT68676 (UFG)
  • Supported Panel – LED/LCD, Single/Dual LVDS (8bit) up to 2048×1152 resolution
  • Video Input
    • “PC-RGB “, i.e. VGA, up to 2048×1152@60 Hz
    • HDMI – 480i, 480p, 576i, 576p, 720p, 1080i, 1080p
  • Audio Input – Earphone Input; 0.2 ~ 2.0 V RMS
  • Audio Output
    • Frequency Response – 100Hz~15KHz @±3dB (1KHz, 0dB reference signal)
    • Max Output Power –  2×1W(8Ω) THD+N<10%@1KHz (Power Supply: 12V, Audio Input: 0.5V RMS )
  • Power
    • Requirements – 12V DC/12V(built-in)/12V,5V(built in)/12V,5V,5VSB(built in)
    • To Panel – 3.3V/5V/12V
    • Standby Power Consumption < 0.5W(Board Only)
  • Keypad – Power, Menu, Volume +/-, and Adjust/Exit
  • Dimensions – 139 x 58 x 17 mm

You can get a more complete technical description on the spec sheet (PDF), including each connector’s pinout description, and schematics for IR and keypad board.

Sample Project: Source: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=67312

Sample Project –  Source: Raspberry Pi Forums

The sellers says it “supports most of the LCD panel from 12.1″ to 55″ with a LVDS interface and a resolution lower than 2048X1152, plug&play kit, no need soldering”, but you need to give the LCD Model number, before purchasing the kit, so that they can check they can give you an inverter board that works with your LCD panel. If you scroll down on the eBay page they have a list of known to work panels such as B170PW03 V.9 or LP171WE2-TL01.

Sample Project - Fully Assembled and Powered by USB Power Bank - More Pics

Sample Project – Fully Assembled and Powered by USB Power Bank – More Pics

Beside the kit, you’ll also need you provide your own HDMI or VGA cable, and power adapter. They also have a kit that include a 12V/4A power adapter for $51.19 in total. It’s clearly a little more challenging than simply using the Lapdock, but that’s an option.

Other sellers and sites are also selling kits, for example Aliexpress, simply look for M.NT68676.2A,. If you think you can manage with the control board only, and somehow already have an inverter board that should work, Banggood sells it for $13.33.

You could also watch a review showing one of the kits used as a monitor for an XBOX.

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