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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

Review of PocketCHIP Hackable Handheld Linux Computer

June 25th, 2016 12 comments

It’s not that easy to describe PocketC.H.I.P in a couple of words, as it’s so versatile. It’s a Debian based portable Linux computer with a resistive touchscreen and battery, but also a retro gaming console thanks to PICO-8, as well as a hardware development platform for IoT application with expansion header providing access to I/Os including GPIOs, I2C, SPI, UART…, and WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity. Furthermore you can easily dismantle the device, in order to use the CHIP board, based on Allwinner R8 Cortex A8 processor, for a different project.

So when Next Thing asked me if I was interested in reviewing Pocket CHIP, I was pretty excited, but when I received it, I scratched my head as there are so many ways to review the item, and it works out of the box with the firmware pre-loaded inside the internal flash, so a getting starting guide would have been too short: “press the power button, and have fun”. So finally, I decided to take a few pictures of hardware, show most of the features, and then go through the different options in the user’s interface.

PocketC.H.I.P Unboxing

I’ve received the device in a black retail package plus a micro USB to USB cable for charging.

PocketCHIP_PackageThe other side of the package has a quick start guide, including a link to PocketCHIP documentation.

PocketCHIP_Quick_Start_GuideBut if you can’t wait, you can most likely jump to step 2, as the device’s battery already has some charge, at least it was the case for me.

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Click to Enlarge

The QWERTY keyboard is quite standard, except the number keys are on two rows, and the arrow keys are located on the top left corner.  The display is using resistive touch, so can use both your finger or a stylus for better accurate. You’ll go through a short tutorial during the first boot. The top has through holes for the I/Os, and at first, they look to be arranged in an undulated way, but I had no problem inserting headers, so that’s just a visual effect. The hole on the top right is likely use to add a necklace, although you could use it as a huge keyring too 🙂

PocketCHIP_PencilThe two holes on each side on the bottom can be used to keep the display straight with the left hole for pens (I also use an old USB WiFi dongle with antenna), and the right hole for pencils. I also ended up using mine as the stylus for the screen.

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Click to Enlarge

The back of the device has a clear cover revealing CHIP board and the battery (11.1Wh @ 3.7V). You can completely disassemble the unit if you want, but I only pulled out the board with my little green tool. You can watch the video review at the end of this review in case you are unsure how to do.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The top of the board has the USB port, a 3.5mm audio jack, a micro USB port, a battery connector, a 4GB NAND flash, Realtek RTL8723BS WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 LE module, AXP209 PMIC, and the expansion headers. The power button is located on the top left. Note that if you want to output to HDMI you’ll need to purchase an extra HDMI adapter. You may also have to reflash the board with a different firmware (TBC).

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The back of the board is protected with a plastic cover tightened with a single screw, and features Allwinner R8 Cortex A8 processor @ 1 GHz, as well as 512MB Samsung DDR3 memory.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The CHIP board is sold for $9 + reasonable shipping, and should be about twice as fast as the original Raspberry Pi Model B board CPU wise. I wrote a comparison of ultra cheap boards’ features pitting CHIP with Raspberry Pi Zero and Orange Pi One if you want to find more details.

CHIP_Pin_MarkingsI also appreciate the markings written on the side of the headers, which makes life a little easier when wiring, as you don’t need to consult the pinout diagram.

What can you do with PocketC.H.I.P?

So after going through the hardware, I’ll show some of the things you do with the pre-installed firmware. Let’s get started by pressing the power button for one or two seconds. The boot will take a little less than one minute during which you’ll be shown several boot logos, and eventually you’ll be greeted by a short tutorial.

PocketCHIP_Tour

Screen resolution: 480×272

SunVox_Music_PocketCHIP_Tour

You can browse the tour with the left and right arrow key, it’s simply explains you can use the touchscheen with your fingers or a stylus, and the various tings you can do such as playing games, making music. Once we are done with the tour, we get into the main menu with four icons: Terminal, PICO-8 games, Make Music (SunVox), Get Help, Write, and Browse Files.

PocketCHIP_Main_Menu

There are also four icons on the edges of the screen showing battery life and WiFi connectivity, setup and power options.PocketCHIP_Settings

Let’s go inside the setup options since it’s one of the first things you’ll want to do if you plan to access the Internet, as this is where you can connect to your WiFi router, and I had no problem doing so, but note that only 2.4 GHz WiFi is supported, and 5GHz access points won’t be shown. You can also adjust brightness and volume for the audio jack, since there aren’t any speakers.

If you wonder how I took the screenshot for this review, I ran the following command in the terminal which gives me five second to go to what ever menu:

but eventually I did so in an SSH sessions with:

…and found the pictures inside ~/Pictures directory despite the following error showing each time as gnome is not install:

The company latter told me they used “xfce4-screenshooter” for their screenshots, so it should be a better option.

Anyway, time to play with the command line:

PocketCHIP_Terminal

Some command to see system info first:

So the device runs Debian 8 with recent Linux kernel (4.3), the rootfs partition is 3.6GB with 3.0GB free (after installing a few apps), there’s 496MB RAM available to Linux, and the processor is indeed a single core Cortex A8 processor made by Allwinner.

Linux 4.6 will start to support lsgpio to list all GPIOs, but in the meantime, we can still check this with sysfs:

With Linux 3.4 legacy kernel, all the GPIOs would show after loading gpio-sunxi module, but since we are using a more recent kernel, the instructions have changed, and you need to export the GPIOs you want to use as explained on linux-sunxi wiki.

The other good news is that apt is working fine, so you install most of the program that work on Debian. One of the first thing I did was to install openssh-server, because while typing on the device might be fun, it’s also slow, so I found it more convenient to access it via an SSH session from my main computer with the username / password combination being both “chip” (without quotes). I also found instructions to install doom on Adafruit, so I tried it:

It worked flawlessly, and I tried the game by simply typing doom,… and success!

PocketCHIP_doomYou’ll need to connect headphone or speaker to get audio, and playing the game with the keyboard is not that easy as beside the WASD keys, you also need to the left and right keys placed just above. So it might be better to connect a USB keyboard to the USB port of CHIP board, or re-assign the keys if possible. Apart from that, the games runs perfectly smoothly.

Let’s go back to the main menu to try PICO-8 retro games, and again you’ll go through a short tour explaining how to use the app to play or edit games with your own sprites.

PICO-8_Tour

PICO-8_Tour_CelesteAfter the tour, you’ll be presented by a selection of 4 “favorites” games: Celeste, Frog Home, Hug Arena, and Tower of Archeos, but you have access to many others games too. I tried Celeste, and no problem, except I need to practice more 🙂PICO-8_CelesteThe option to “edit this cart” will bring you to the games code, which you can edit as your wish.

PICO-8_Game_CodeThere’s also PICO-8 terminal to perform various actions such as loading files,  creating directories, and so on.

Next up the Make Music app (SunVox) will also take you through a tour first.

SunVox_Tour

After connecting headphone or speaker, you’ll be able to compose and play music on a MIDI keyboard.PocketCHIP_Sunvox

The application definitely requires a stylus – a pencil will do – especially the top menu options, and even kids’ fingers will be too big.Sunvox_Menu

The four icon in the main menu starts an help section with a scrolling bar. So much to say about this one.PocketCHIP_Help

The “Write” icon is a text edit, which turns out to be Leafpad 0.8.0.1. It could be your text editor to write Python or other languages programs, before running them in the command line.PocketCHIP_Leafpad

Finally the File Browser is the commonly used PCManFM 1.2.3, and allows to copy, delete, move, or create files or directories.

PocketCHIP_File_Manager

So I’ve gone through all options provided on the pre-loaded firmware, so it’s time to turn it off. You can click on the bottom right corner to select Shutdown, Sleep, or Reboot options, as well as “Flash firmware” to reboot into software flashing mode. You can then follow the firmware flashing instructions @ http://pcflash.getchip.com (Chrome browser required).PocketCHIP_Shutdown_OptionsIf you prefer a video review, and I’ve embedded mine below. I checkout the hardware until 3:05, before starting the device, and showing it action.

So overall, PocketC.H.I.P is a fun device to use, and should be particularly interesting for kids, as they can play games, compose music, and learn about Linux, programming and/or hardware hacking with this inexpensive all-in-one device. PocketC.H.I.P is currently available for pre-order for $49 + shipping for a limited time, after which it will sell for $69.

Forlinx i.MX6UL Linux Single Board Computer Supports ESAM Embedded Security Control Module

June 23rd, 2016 3 comments

Forlinx Embedded has introduced i.MX6UL single board computer (SBC) based on NXP i.MX 6Ultralite Cortex A7 processor with 512 MB RAM, 8GB storage, that includes two Ethernet interface, an LCD interface, a CAN bus, as well as ESAM (Embedded System Access Module) support via either a SIM card like slot, or a 8-pin DIP chip compatible with ISO7816 standard, and typically used in the financial, telecommunications, transportation sectors for authentication and secure data transfer.

Forlinx_iMX6UL_SBCForlinx I.MX6UL board specifications:

  • System-on-module:
    • SoC – NXP i.MX 6Ultralite ARM Cortex A7 processor @ up to 528 MHz with 2D graphics GPU
    • System Memory – 512 MB LvDDR3 memory
    • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash (but hardware manual says 1GB eMMC flash, but also mentioned MTFC8GACAAAM-1M WT so it must 8GB after all…)
    • 2x 80-pin board to board connectors with signals for 2x CAN bus, 2x USB device, 2x SDIO, 2x 10/100M Ethernet, 24-bit RGB, 4x I2C, 3x “AUDIO” (I2S?), 4x SPI, 1x QSPI, 8x UART/irDA, JTAG, 8x PWM, parallel camera I/F, 10-ch ADC, 1x S/PDIF, 8×8 keypad ports, and 2x ISO7816-3 interface (for ESAM)
    • Voltage – 5V
    • Dimension – 50 x 40 mm
  • iMX6UL baseboard
    • Storage – SD card slot
    • Connectivity – 2x 10/100M Ethernet (RJ45), WiFi 802.11 b/g/n and Bluetooth (Realtek RTL8723BU) with two SMA antenna connectors
    • Audio – 3.5mm earphone jack, 3.5 microphone jack, 2x speaker headers, on-board microphone
    • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
    • Display – 24-bit RGB LCD header
    • Camera – Header with CSI signals
    • Expansion
      • I2c header, UART1, 2 & 3 headers
      • SDIO header
      • PWM for LCD backlight
      • 4x ADC for resistive touch
    • Debugging – JTAG header, DB9 console header
    • Misc – 4x LEDs, power button, boot configuration jumpers, reset button, RTC and battery
    • Security – ESAM sim card holder or 8-pin DIP chip.
    • Power Supply – 5V
    • Dimensions – 190 x 130 mm

The board runs Linux 3.14.38 with Qt, and is also said to support 3G via ZTE MD210 USB dongle, and GPS via one of the serial ports. Since the product page documentation is rather poor, as even the specs are clearly incomplete (e.g. no mention of ESAM), I asked more information to the company, and they provide both hardware manual and Linux user guide, both of which are in English. Sadly, even the information in those document is incomplete, as for example there are not details about software configuration for ESAM and GPS. Once of the document recommends to access more documentation on WITECH BBS, but it appears to be only in Chinese.

The board and module were launched in March, so they should be shipping now. Pricing is not available publicly.

Get an Early ESP32 Board by Contributing to Luanode for ESP8266 & ESP32 Project (Crowdfunding)

June 22nd, 2016 4 comments

Development boards and module based on Espressif ESP32 dual core processor with WiFi and Bluetooth LE connectivity are due for Q3 or Q4 2016, but you could get an early sample as early as July if you contribute to Jimmy Wu’s (of wifimcu.com) crowdfunding campaign to develop Luanode (Lua SDK) for ESP8266 and ESP32 processors, as ESP32 boards are part of the rewards.

ESP32_Development_Kit

Luanode is a Lua SDK for ESP32 and ESP8266 that supports multi-tasking through FreeRTOS, and includes support for peripherals. The source code and documentation can be already be found on Github, and the main differences against something like NodeMCU appear to be multi-tasking and (for now) ESP32 support. Interestingly the SDK contains a tools called WiFi-Killer uses for Denial of Service (DoS) attacks using ESP8266 or ESP32 modules…

ESP32_Video_Camera_Tank

One hardware project is called WiFi tank comprised of one T300 Tank Chassis, ESP8266 Development Kit, 720p HD Camera, WR703N Wireless Router, and controlled by an Android or iOS smartphone. The company behind the project is DOIT (Doctors of Intelligence and Technology) and the funds would be used for hardware, software, and documentation.

With less than 3 days to go, the campaign has not reached its goal yet however. ESP32 development kit rewards is $19, while a pack with 6 ESP32 devkit only costs $39 (maybe baseboard + 6 modules?), and the WiFi tank “video car” is also offered for $219. Shipping appears to be included, and delivery is scheduled for July 2016 for all three rewards.

Thanks to Harley for the tip.

Espressif ESP8285 is just like ESP8266 but with 1MB built-in Flash, and Designed for Wearables

June 22nd, 2016 1 comment

Espressif announced ESP8285 WiFi SoC was entering production last March. The new processor is based on ESP8266, but the company added 1MB built-in flash to make the solution smaller, and more suitable to wearables such as smartwatches and activity trackers.

ESP8285

A.I. Thinker ESP8285 Module

ESP8285 features a Tensilica L106 32-bit MCU and another ultra-low-power 16-bit RISC core, as well as 802.11 b/g/n/d/e/i/k/r WiFi connectivity. AI Thinker has already produced a tiny module based on the solution, called ESP-8285, and another person has developed an ESP8285 development board sold on Tindie for $24.95, and with some code sample (Arduino sketches) on Github.

ESP8285_Development_Board

Espressif ESP8285 Development Board

You’ll also find some more technical information on a Devacron blog post, or inside the datasheet on Espressif website.

ESP8285 Block Diagram

ESP8285 Block Diagram

Via Hackaday

Fireduino Arduino Compatible Board Features Rockchip RKnanoD Dual Core Cortex-M3 MCU (Crowdfunding)

June 21st, 2016 3 comments

Rockchip RKNanoD dual core Cortex M3 micro-controller was introduced last year for IoT and audio applications, and the Firefly team, known for their FirePrime or Firefly-RK3288 development boards, has designed an Arduino compatible board based on the MCU with lots of audio ports, Arduino headers, and WiFi connectivity.

FireduinoFireduino specifications:

  • MCU – Rockchip RKnanoD dual core ARM Cortex M3 MCU @ up to 250 MHz (system core) / 500 MHz (calculate core) with respectively 640 KB and 384 KB RAM
  • Storage – 4 or 8MB SPI flash + micro SD slot
  • Audio
    • 24-bit/192 KHz audio codec (built in MCU) with HW accelerator for APE, FLAC, OGG, and MP3 audio decoding
    • 1x 3.5mm analog audio jack
    • 2x 3.5mm LINE In jacks
    • 1x On-board microphone
    • DLNA wireless audio support
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi via Ampak AP6181 module
  • Expansion
    • Arduino header with I2C, SPI, ADC, GPIO, PWM, UART
    • LCD interface (Intel 8080 mode) up to 400×400 resolution
  • Debugging – Serial console
  • Misc – HYM8563 RTC chip, 2x user LEDs, 1x power LED, buttons (reset, power and upgrade)
  • Power  Supply – 5 to 12V via 5.5/2.1mm DC jack ; 5V via micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 108.8 x 53.4 mm
  • Weight – 37 grams

The board can be programmed with either the Arduino IDE, or FireBlocks, a fork of Scratch visual programming utility.

Rockchip_RKnanoD_Block_Diagram

Rockchip RKNanoD MCU Block Diagram

The board can be used for robotics thanks to its many I/Os, IoT with WiFi connectivity, or for audio applications with the on-chip audio codec and various audio connectors. Some documentation is already available on the Wiki, and a few potential applications are shown in the promo video below.

The project will be launched in Kickstarter next week (June 27), and the draft page currently shows the board can be had for as low as $15 with an 8GB micro SD card with an “Hello World” pledge, but the normal KS price will be $25, and some rewards with various quantities up to 100 boards are also listed. Delivery is scheduled for September 2016. Since the page is still in draft mode, it’s not possible to check shipping fees for now.

Orange Pi PC Plus Quad Core Development Board with 1GB RAM, 8GB eMMC flash Sells for $20

June 9th, 2016 25 comments

Most low cost development boards do not include internal storage in order to decrease costs, and instead require their users to flash their preferred operating system on (micro) SD card. This makes it easy to get started, but many micro SD cards often suffer from poor random I/O performance, even for Class 10 or greater card, leading to a poor user experience compared to what you’d get with an eMMC flash. Shenzhen Xunlong has released yet another Allwinner H3 board, namely Orange Pi PC Plus, similar to Orange Pi PC but adding WiFi, and 8GB eMMC flash.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Orange Pi PC Plus specifications with main change with Orange Pi PC highlighted in bold:

  • SoC – Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex A7 @ 1.3 GHz with ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU up to 600 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash + micro SD card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI with CEC, AV port
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, AV port, on-board microphone
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi with external antenna
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI Interface
  • Expansions – 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header with 28 GPIOs, UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, CAN, I2S, SPDIF, LRADC, ADC, LINE-IN, FM-IN, and HP-IN
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART header for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver; Power button; Power and status LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via barrel jack (micro USB OTG cannot be used to power the board).
  • Dimensions – 85 x 55 mm

Orange_Pi_PC_Plus_Board_BackAs usual, the description states that the board supports “Android 4.4, Ubuntu, Debian, Raspberry Pi Image”, but most people who want to run Linux will now go with Armbian server or desktop image instead, using a Linux 3.4 legacy kernel. Mainline support for the server image is almost there for all Orange Pi H3 boards.

As usual with Shenzhen Xunlong boards, the price is very competitive, and Orange Pi PC Plus is sold for $19.99 + $3.43 for shipping on Aliexpress. As a side note, while Aliexpress used to be the only options to buy a Orange Pi boards, the little inexpensive boards have become a little more popular recently, and I’ve seen several models sell on other websites such as DealExtreme, eBay, GearBest and others…

Allwinner H3 Boards Comparison Tables with Orange Pi, Banana Pi M2+, NanoPi P1, and H3-OlinuXino-NANO Boards

June 8th, 2016 44 comments

Allwinner H3 SoC has now found its way into many low cost development boards, including several Orange Pi Boards, Banana Pi M2+, NanoPi M1, and Olimex H3-OlinuXino-NANO, and it might be difficult to choose among the list of boards available, so tkaiser has written a buyer’s guide for boards supported by Armbian, with some of the key differentiating factors, and on my side, I thought it might be a good idea to draw a comparison table between the boards.

Allwinner_H3_Development_Boards

Since a table with 10 boards would be hard to read, I made two tables: one with boards with 512 MB RAM + Orange Pi PC / PC Plus, and a second table with higher end boards with 1 to 2 GB RAM, and more features. But first let’s talk about Allwinner H3 SoC since it’s common to all boards. It’s a quad core Cortex A7 processor clocked at up to 1.2 GHz (plus if overclocking but this may lead to overheating), with a Mali-400 MP2 GPU, and support for H.264 and H.265 videos up to 4K @ 30 Hz.

With this mind, the first table takes care of the ultra-low cost boards that sell for less than $20, except the Olimex board which has not been released yet, and could  cost a little more.

Orange Pi One Orange Pi Lite Nano Pi M1 Orange Pi PC / Orange Pi PC Plus H3-Olinuxino-NANO
RAM 512 MB 512MB or 1GB 1GB 512 MB
Storage micro SD card slot micro SD card slot
PC Plus adds: 8GB eMMC
micro SD card slot
Ethernet 10/100M No 10/100M
Wireless Connectivity No WiFi 802.11 b/g/n No PC Plus only: WiFi 802.11 b/g/n No
USB 1x USB Host port
1x micro USB OTG port
2x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
3x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
2x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
Video HDMI HDMI, 3.5mm AV jack HDMI
Audio HDMI HDMI, on-board microphone HDMI, AV, on-board microphone HDMI
I/Os and other peripherals 40-pin Raspberry Pi connector
CSI interface for camera
40-pin Raspberry Pi connector
CSI interface for camera
IR receiver
40-pin Raspberry Pi connector
DVP interface for camera
IR receiver
40-pin Raspberry Pi connector
CSI interface for camera
IR receiver
2x 40-pin headers
Power 5V via power barrel
5V via header
5V via micro USB port, or 4.7 ~ 5.6 V via VDD pin 5V via power barrel
5V via header
5V via micro USB port
Dimensions 69×48 mm 64×50 mm 85×55 mm 50×50 mm
Listed Price $9.99 $12 $11 Pi PC: $15
Pi PC+: $19.99
N/A
Shipping $3.39 $3.39 $10 $3.43 N/A
Total $13.38 $15.39 $21 Pi PC: $18.43
Pi PC+: $23.42
N/A

Followed by a second table with boards with more memory, fast storage, Gigabit Ethernet, and so on.

Orange Pi 2 / Orange Pi mini 2 Orange Pi Plus Banana Pi M2+ Orange Pi Plus 2E Orange Pi Plus 2
RAM 1GB 2GB
Storage micro SD card slot 8GB eMMC flash
Micro SD slot
SATA (via USB to SATA bridge)
micro SD card slot
8GB eMMC flash
16GB eMMC Flash
Micro SD slot
8GB eMMC flash
Micro SD slot
SATA (via USB to SATA bridge)
Ethernet 10/100M Gigabit Ethernet
Wireless Connectivity 802.11 b/g/n WiFi (except in mini 2) WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
USB 4x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
2x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
3x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
4x USB 2.0 host ports
1x micro USB OTG port
Video HDMI and AV HDMI HDMI and AV
Audio HDMI, AV, on-board microphone HDMI, AV, on-board microphone HDMI HDMI, AV, on-board microphone
I/Os and other peripherals 40-pin Raspberry Pi connector
CSI interface for camera
IR receiver
Power 5V via power barrel
5V via header
5V via power barrel
5V via micro USB port
5V via power barrel
5V via header
Dimensions 93×60 mm 112 x 60 mm 65×65 mm 108×67 mm
Listed Price Pi 2 – $30
Pi mini 2 – $25
$39.00 $39.90 $35.00 $49.00
Shipping N/A $3.75 $0 $3.57 $3.26
Total Not for sale anymore $42.75 $39.90 $38.57 $52.26

Some remarks

  1. There’s no difference between boards with regards to the 40-pin Raspberry Pi connectors, and only H3-Olinuxino-NANO will have a different pinout, as well as more I/Os. It will also be the only open source hardware board of the list.
  2. SATA implementation are using a USB 2.0  to SATA bridge since Allwinner H3 does not come with either SATA. PCIe, or USB 3.0 interface, and performance is not different, and in some case lower, than simply connecting a USB hard drive to the board.
  3. Boards with 4 USB ports + micro USB OTG will share the bandwidth through a USB hub controller, so performance may be impacted, and boards such as Orange Pi Plus 2E with 3 USB ports that do not use a USB hub controller should have better USB throughput.
  4. Voltage regulator
    • SY8106A used on most Orange Pi boards allows for finer tuning of the CPU voltage, and a better control of CPU throttling and heat management
    • The GPIO driven voltage regulator on NanoPi M1 and Orange Pi One/Lite only allows for 1.1V and 1.3V voltage selection
    • Banana Pi M2+ is set to work at 1.3V only.
  5. Boards with eMMC flash should provide a significantly better user experience thanks to much faster random I/O compared to most (micro) SD cards
  6. Memory type matters. It has been found that boards with DDR3 memory tend to overheat much more than boards with DDR3L memory. At the time of writing, Xunlong Orange Pi boards are all based on DDR3L memory, but Banana Pi M2+ and NanoPi M1 boards are fitted with DDR3 memory instead. [Update: It has be discovered that Orange Pi One/Lite are actually using DDR3 memory, and do not overheat, so more investigation is needed to find out what the problem may be]

Please let me know if I should add anything to the table, or corrections need to be made.

SD 600eval Development Board Compliant with 96Boards CE Extended To Sell for $279

June 6th, 2016 7 comments

Last month, we found out that Arrows Electronics was working on DragonBoard 600c development board featuring Qualcomm Snapragon 600 processor and based on 96Boards CE Extended version which allows for extra features such as SATA and Ethernet ports. At the time, the complete specifications were not available, and neither pricing. We do now have more details, as the board designed by Elinfochips is (also) called SD 600eval, and is available on back order for $279.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

SD 600eval specifications:

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (APQ8064) quad-core Krait 300 processor  @ up to 1.7 GHz with Adreno 320 GPU @ 400MHz supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0, OpenCL 1.1, WebGL 1.0, and DirectX 9.3
  • System Memory – 2GB PoP LPDDR2 @ 533 MHz
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC Flash + micro SD 3.0 (UHS-1) slot + SATA port
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p
  • Video – [email protected] HD video playback and capture (h.264/AVC)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet via AR8151 PCIe chip, 802.11n/g/n/ac WiFi 2×2 and Bluetooth 4.0 LE, GPS/GLONASS with external GPS antenna
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Expansion:
    • 1x 40 pin low speed expansion connector – 2x UART, SPI, PCM, 2x I2C, 12x GPIO, DC power
    • 1x 60 pin high speed expansion connector – 4L-MIPI DSI, USB, HSIC, 2x I2C, 2L+4L MIPI CSI
    • 1x 16-pin & 40-pin audio expansion connector – Stereo headset/Line OUT, speaker, analog/digital microphones
  • Sensors – On-board magnetometer, gyro meter, and accelerometer
  • Misc – Volume, power & reset buttons. 6 LEDS (4x user, 1x Wifi, 1x Bluetooth), RTC battery slot
  • Power Supply – +6.5 – 18V DC input
  • Dimensions – 100 x 100 mm (96Boards Consumer Edition Extended dimensions specifications)
  • Operating Temperature Range – 0 to 50 deg. C
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The company provides Android 5.1 with Linux 3.4 support for the board, and Linaro will provide the Linux BSP for D 600eval/Dragonboard 600c, so hopefully a more recent Linux kernel will be supported. There are several links to software and hardware documentation, source code and binaries on the “Resources” section of the product page, including schematics (PDF) and hardware user manual.