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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

NanoPi is a $16 WiFi and Bluetooth LE Linux Development Board

July 25th, 2015 16 comments

NanoPi is a new Linux development board powered by Samsung S3C2451 ARM9 processor with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth LE connectivity, connectors for a camera and an LCD display, as well as two expansion headers including a 40-pin “Raspberry Pi compatible” header.
NanoPi
NanoPi specifications:

  • Processor – Samsung S3C2451 ARM9 @ 400Mhz
  • System Memory – 64M DDR2
  • Storage – micro SD slot
  • Connectivity – AP6210 module for 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 1.1 host port, 1x micro USB OTG port for power and data (serial or Ethernet)
  • Display I/F – LCD Interface: 0.5mm pitch SMT FPC seat, support full-color LCD (RGB: 8-8-8)
  • Camera I/F – DVP Camera Interface: 0.5mm pitch FPC connector, including ITU-R BT 601/656 8-bit, I2C and GPIOs
  • Debugging – Serial Port
  • Expansion Headers
    • “GPIO1″ – 40-pin header including UART, SPI, I2C, GPIO pins (Raspberry Pi compatible)
    • “GPIO2″ – 12-pin header including I2S, I2C, UART pins
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port or headers
  • Dimensions – 75 x 30 mm

NanoPi_Board

The board is said to run u-boot, a Linux distribution based on Linux 4.1 and Qt, as well as Debian. You can download firmware images, source code, and schematics (PDF only), and checkout the Quick Start Guide to find out how to get started with a PC running Ubuntu.

NanoPi launch is planned for the 1st of August, and it will sell for $16, although I’m not sure whether shipping is included. Visit nanopi.org for details.

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ODROID-C1+ Board is an Upcoming Upgrade to ODROID-C1 Board

July 22nd, 2015 12 comments

ODROID-C1 board has been relatively popular thanks to its great hardware features and good software support for its $35 price tag. In mid-June however, ODROID-C1 got out of stock due to sudden large orders, and it was only scheduled to sale again in early August because of long leadtime for some components. It turns out ODROID-C1 may never sell again, simply because it will be replaced by ODROID-C1+ with various improvements.

ODROID-C1+ Development Board

ODROID-C1+ Development Board

It’s still very much based on ODROID-C1 with Amlogic S805 processor, 1GB RAM, and an eMMC sockets, but Hardkernel made the following improvements:

  • HDMI connector change to Type-A from Type-D (micro HDMI).
  • Improved SD card compatibility
  • CEC function whether the RTC backup battery is installed or not
  • ODROID-C1+ can be powered from the USB OTG port as well as DC-Jack
  • I2S signals exposed for external audio DAC

ODROID_C1_plus_description

All of which are welcomed modifications. The board size will remain the same, and the large heatsink will be included by default, which partially explains a small downside: the price is slated to increase from $35 to $37 or $38. ODROID-C1+ development board will be launched in August.

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MXCHIP EMW3165 is an $8 CE/FCC Certified WiFi Module with an STM32F4 Cortex M4 MCU

July 17th, 2015 13 comments

A few months ago, Seeed Studio started selling MXCHIP EMW3162 Wi-Fi module with a STM32F2 Cortex M3 MCU clocked at 120Mhz for $9.95. It’s more capable than ESP8266 modules but also around 3 times more expensive. The company has now launched another WiFi module called MXCHIP EMW3165 with an STM32F4 Cortex M4 MCU @ 100 MHz, FCC certification, and listed for $7.95.
EMW3165EMW3165 module specifications:

  • MCU – STMicro STM32F411CE ARM Cortex M4 micro-controller @ 100 MHz with 512KB flash, 128KB RAM, DSP, and FPU
  • Storage – 2MB SPI flash
  • Wi-Fi connectivity
    • 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n (single stream)
    • WEP, WPA/WPA2 PSK/Enterprise
    • 16.5dBm@11b; 14.5dBm@11g; 13.5dBm@11n
    • Receiver Sensitivity – 87 dBm
    • Station, Soft AP and Wi-Fi direct
    • Support EasyLink
    • On-board PCB antenna (EMW3165-P model) or IPEX connector for external antenna (EMW3165-E model)
    • CE & FCC compliant
  • Peripherals:
    • 22 GPIOs
    • USART, I2C
    • ADC, DAC
    • Timer/PWM
    • JTAG/SWD debug interface
  • Connectors – 1×20 + 1x 21 half-through holes on both sides of the module (1mm pitch)
  • Dimensions – 32 x 16 mm
  • Operating voltage – 3.0V~3.3V
  • Operating Temperature – -30°C to +85°C

EMW3165_Block_DiagramMore details can be found in the datasheet.The main difference with EMW3162 module is the STM32F4 processor replacing STM32F2 processor, 2MB on-board flash (EMW3162 used 1MB on-chip flash only), and a smaller footprint. EMW3165 also appear to lack SPI and I2S found on EMW3162.

I could not find information about the software development tools, but it’s likely you can use the same tools as for EMW3162 namely Broadcom WICED firmware development kit, or MXCHIP MICO (Mico-controller based Internet Connectivity Operation System).

EMW3165_Development_Kit

EMWE-3165 Development Board

EMWE-3165 is the baseboard for EMW3165 module with an NFC antenna, JTAG, USB, DB9 interface (serial), buttons, as well as supports for battery. It sells for $21.95 on Seeed Studio.
You can also find some more details on MXCHIP EMW3165 Download page.
Via HackADay. Thanks to Lalith for the tip!
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ODROID-XU4 Development Board is a Smaller and Cheaper Version of ODROID-XU3 Board

July 14th, 2015 17 comments

Many people are expecting Hardkernel to launch an Exynos 7 board, but this won’t be with ODROID-XU4, maybe with ODROID-XU5, as the latest development board from Hardkernel is a modified version of ODROID-XU3 with the same Exynos 5422 octa-core processor with four Cortex-A15 cores @ 2GHz and four Cortex-A7 cores.
ODROID-XU4ODROID-XU4 board specifications (differences with ODROID-XU3 highlighted and sometimes crossed out in bold):

  • SoC – Samsung Exynos 5422 quad core ARM Cortex-A15 @ 2.0GHz quad core ARM Cortex-A7 @ 1.4GHz with Mali-T628 MP6 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 3.0 / 2.0 / 1.1 and OpenCL 1.1 Full profile
  • System Memory – 2GB LPDDR3 RAM PoP (750 MHz, 12GB/s memory bandwidth, 2x32bit bus)
  • Storage – Micro SD slot (up to 64GB) + eMMC 5.0 module socket (16, 32, and 64GB modules available)
  • Video Output – micro HDMI (Up to 1080p) and DisplayPort (up to 2160p)
  • Audio Output – HDMI, 3.5mm headphone jack, and optional S/PDIF out via USB module
  • Network Connectivity – 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet (~880 Mbps measured with iperf). and optional USB Wi-Fi dongle with antenna
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0 host port, 1x USB 2.0 ports
  • Expansion – 30-pin header for access to GPIO, IRQ, SPI and ADC signals + 12-pin headers for GPIO., I2S, and I2C
  • Debugging – Serial console header
  • Misc – Accurate current sensors and voltage sensors for energy measurement, Power and RGB LEDs, cooling fan header, power button, RTC
  • Power Supply – 5V/4A power adapter using 5.5/2.1mm barrel.
  • Dimensions – 82 x 58 x 22 mm (ODROID-XU3: 94x70x18mm;)
  • Weight – 60 grams with fan
Block Diagram for ODROID-XU4 Board (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram for ODROID-XU4 Board (Click to Enlarge)

One of the cool changes is the HDMI type A connector replacing the micro HDMI port found on most other ODROID boards, and which (indirectly) caused issues for several people, including myself. The Ethernet port now supports Gigabit Ethernet, there are two full-size USB 3.0 host ports, a few more I/Os, and the board is smaller. However, a few ports and ICs are gone including USB OTG support, DisplayPort output, the Audio codec (and audio jack), and the power monitoring sensors. The memory is now clocked at 750 MHz instead and 933 MHz in ODROID-XU3 and ODROID-XU3 Lite.

You can check the introduction video for a quick overview of the new board.

ODROID-XU4 is software compatible with ODROID-XU3 so there’s probably not much new here, and the board supports Ubuntu 15.04 (with OpenGL ES + OpenCL support), and Android 4.4 KitKat and 5.0 Lollipop.

I’m pretty sure most people will still be happy with the board despite some of the lost features, as while ODROID-XU3 costs $179, the new ODROID-XU4 sells for only $74 with a 5V/4A power supply, and the heatsink + fan (mounted). If you are interested, you can purchase it via Hardkernel website, or one of their distributors. It’s also cheaper than  ODROID-XU3 Lite ($99) with features the same Exynos processor but clocked at a lower frequency.

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Banana Pi BPI-M3 Development Board Features Allwinner A83T Octa core Processor

July 9th, 2015 13 comments

Banana Pi developers, in this case SinoVoIP, and not LeMaker, are about to launch a new board: BPI-M3 powered by Allwinner A83T octa core Cortex A7 processor with 2GB RAM and 8GB eMMC.

Banana_PI_BPI-M3Banana Pi M3 board specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A83T octa-core ARM Cortex-A7 @ 2.0 GHz with PowerVR SGX544MP GPU supporting OpenGL ES 2.0/1.1, OpenCL 1.1, DX 9.3.
  • System Memory – 2 GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 8 GB eMMC + SATA (via Genesys GL830 USB bridge) + micro SD slot
  • Display Interfaces / Video Output – HDMI 1.4 up to 1920×1200, MIPI DSI connector
  • Audio – 3.5mm headphone jack, microphone, HDMI audio
  • Camera I/F – MIPI CSI and Parallel camera interfaces
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (Realtek RTL8211E/D), 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0 (AP 6212 module)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host port, 1x micro USB OTG
  • Debugging – UART for console
  • Headers – 40-pin mostly Raspberry Pi compatible header
  • Misc – Power, reset and u-boot buttons, IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via power barrel or micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 92 x 60mm
  • Weight – 45 grams

Banana_Pi_M3
The company claims the board supports Android 5.1, Debian linux, Ubuntu linux, Raspberry Pi images, and more. I have never had the opportunity to test a Banana Pi board myself before, but I can see quite a few complains about documentation and software support in their forums.

Despite being an octa-core processor, Allwinner A83T processor is not the fastest processor around, as when I tested an Allwinner A83T tablet last year, the system just got under 27,000 points with Antutu 5.3.

SinoVoiP has not provided any price yet, nor do we have any release date, but the company has already manufactured 100 pieces to complete development, so this should just take a few more weeks or a couple of months. More details can be found on the product page, and especially on the forum post announcing the board.

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BBC Micro Bit Educational Board Features nRF51822 ARM Cortex M0 MCU

July 7th, 2015 2 comments

The BBC announces its intention to give away 1 million Micro Bit to British schoolchildren a few months ago, but at the time, the specifications were not completely frozen. The broadcaster has now finalized the design which is based on an ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller.Micro_Bit

 

Micro Bit board specifications:

  • ARM Cortex M0 micro-controller (Nordic Micro nRF51822 Bluetooth SoC)
  • 5x holes for 3V, GND, and 3 GPIOs
  • 2x user buttons, 1x reset button
  • 25x red LED indicator lights in a 5×5 matrix
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth LE
  • Sensors – Compass, magnetometer, accelerometer
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for port and programming
  • Power – 5V via USB or battery port to connect two AAA batteries
  • Dimensions – 4cm x 5cm

Micro_Bit_Back

On the software side, the BBC has partnered with Microsoft to develop a web based, drag and drop interface for programming called TouchDevelop. Samaug is also involved in the project as they are developing the Android app, and an iOS app is also planned.

The BBC will send 1 million pieces of the board to schools in the UK this autumn, but they also plan to sell the board to the general public, although pricing and availability information is not available yet.

Via Hexus

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LeMaker Guitar is a $25 Single Board Computer Powered by Actions Semi S500 Processor

June 25th, 2015 2 comments

LeMaker, better known for the Banana Pi, has recently unveiled three boards at an event in China:

  • LeMaker Bass – a 96Boards compliant board powered by Actions Semi S900 quad core processor
  • LeMaker Piano – An industrial grade single board computer based on Freescale i.MX6 Solo, Dual or Quad
  • LeMaker Guitar – A low cost board powered by Actions Semi S500 processor

There are plenty of Freescale i.MX6 industrial boards on the market, and LeMaker Bass appears to be the previously announced Bubblegum-96 board now supported by Lemaker, so I’m going to focus on LeMaker Guitar in this post. It’s good to see at least one company dropped the “fruit + pi” theme for their new boards…

Guitar Module

Guitar Module

The Guitar board is comprised of a system on module (SoM), and a baseboard. The SoM comes with the following technical specifications:

  • SoC – Actions Semi S500 quad core Cortex A9r4 processor @ 1.3 GHz with 512KB L2 Cache and a PowerVR SGX544 GPU with OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0, OpenVG 1.0.1, and OpenCL support
  • Memory – 1GB DDR3 RAM (Option: 2GB)
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC (SK Hynix H26M41103HPR), with optional ranging between 4GB and 32GB eMMC (or NAND flash)
  • PMU – ATC2603C (also audio codec)
  • Misc – LCD interface switch to select different voltages depending on the LCD interface such as RGB/LVDS/MIPI.
  • SoM Connector – 204-pin SO-DIMM edge connector
  • Dimensions – 67.6 x 42.2 mm
LeMaker Guitar Board (Click to Enlarge)

LeMaker Guitar Board (Click to Enlarge)

The baseboard will feature the following:

  • Processor/Memory/Storage – Via Guitar SoM
  • External storage – micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (RJ45), 802.11 b/g/n WiFi (AP6181 module)
  • Video Output – HDMI up to 1080p, AV output (composite), LVDS & MIPI-DSI for LCD panels.
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack (AV port), built-in microphone
  • Camera – MIPI -CSI/Parallel 8-bit camera interface
  • USB – micro USB 3.0 host/device port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Debugging – COM3 port for serial console
  • Expansion – 40-pin header with 28x GPIO, that can also be configured as UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, I2S, ADC, FM-IN
  • Misc – IR receiver, power button, power and user LEDs, RTC + battery slot, 1KB EEPROM
  • Power Supply – 5~12V / 2A input in 5.5/2.1mm power barrel
  • Dimensions – 88mm x 88mm
Block Diagram for LeMaker Guitar SBC

Block Diagram for LeMaker Guitar SBC

The company announced support for Android 5.0 for the board, but Linux is also likely to be supported. It might be something to confirm on their forums.

The board is somewhat similar to what is offered by Lemon Pi, but at $25 it should be cheaper, if the price announced during the event is indeed for the complete SBC. Launch is scheduled for summer 2015. Some more information is available on the product page, and more details should eventually be added to the Wiki.

Thanks to quillan for the tip.

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Freescale Introduces a Coin-sized Single Chip Module (SCM) Based on Freescale i.MX 6Dual

June 24th, 2015 13 comments

As the Freescale Technology Forum 2015 is taking place in Austin, Texas, the company will announce a few new products over the 4-day conference. After the official launch of Freescale i.MX 7 series processors, Freescale unveiled a new product based on their existing i.MX6 platform with “i.MX 6Dual SCM” (Single Chip Module) that integrate a dual core i.MX 6Dual processor with 1 or 2 GB LPDDR2 (PoP), a 16MB NOR flash and a PMIC in a tiny, coin-sized module.

SCM_i.MX6D Key feature of SCM-i.MX6D module:

  • Freescale i.MX 6Dual application processor with two ARM Cortex A9 core @ 800 MHz and Vivante GPUs (2D/3D)
  • System Memory – 1 or 2 GB LPDDR2 (PoP configuration)
  • Storage – 16 MB SPI NOR (Micron N25Q128A13)
  • Power Supply – Freescale PMIC PF0100
  • Dimensions – 17mm x 14mm x 1.7mm

There are also 109 discrete components on the module. BSPs for Linux and Android will be provided.

Module Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Module Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

To help with early development, Freescale is also planning to soon launch an SCM-i.MX6D Evaluation Board with the following specs:

  • Module: SCM-i.MX6D with 1GB RAM
  • Storage – eMMC + 2x SD car slots, usable for boot, storage, and WiFi cards
  • Connectivity – 1x GbE port, WiFi (via SD slot)
  • USB – 1x Type A USB port, 1x Micro-AB USB port
  • Audio – Stereo audio codec; microphone input
  • Expansion – 1x Mini-PCIe socket
  • Misc – 1x CAN connector

Optional modules adding HDMI output, LVDS (10.1″ display), WiFi, and others will also become available with the evaluation kit.

SCM i.MX6D Evaluation Board

SCM i.MX6D Evaluation Board

Freescale’s SCM modules are expected to be used in applications ranging from 3D gaming goggles, to “next-generation” IoT drones as well as other IoT products, a medical equipment, and autonomous sensing applications.

The i.MX 6Dual SCM should become available in August 2015 either directly from Freescale, or through Arrow Electronics, and more SCM products are planned for the next two years. Check out SCM-i.MX6D product page for details.

Via Liliputing and LinuxGizmos

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