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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

$249 Nitrogen6 MAX Development Board Features Freescale i.MX6 Quad, 4GB RAM, mPCIe Connector, and More

April 9th, 2014 No comments

There are now many low cost development boards based on Freescale i.MX6 ARM Cortex A9 processors with WandboardSabre Lite, UDOO, Nitrogen6X among others, all selling for less than $200. Boundary devices, the company behind Nitrogen6X board, has made a new version called Nitrogen6 MAX that maxes out the RAM to 4GB, adds a full mPCIE slot, a dual channel LVDS connector, and 4GB on-board eMMC.

Nitrogen6 MAX Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Nitrogen6 MAX Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Nitrogen6 MAX specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX 6Q quad core ARM Cortex A9 processor at 1GHz with Vivante GC2000 3D GPU
  • System Memory – 4GB 64-bit DDR3 @ 532MHz
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC, SATA connector, two micro SDHC card slots, 2MB Serial Flash
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1G Ethernet, TiWi 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth BLE module
  • Display Output – HDMI, 2x LVDS, Parallell RGB
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, Analog (headphone/mic) audio and 2W amplified audio
  • Camera I/F – Parallel camera port with OV5642 Interface, MIPI camera port with OV5640 Interface
  • USB – 3x High speed USB ports (2xHost, 1xOTG)
  • Headers
    • 2 RS-232 Serial ports + 1 Selectable RS485/RS232
    • 10-pin JTAG interface
    • I2C/GPIO/SPI signals
    • CAN port
  • Expansion Slots – PCI express port
  • Misc – Real Time Clock with battery
  • Dimensions – 5.25″ x 3.5″ (13.33 x 8.89 cm)

Several accessories are available with the board: MIPI and Parallel Cameras, 7” 1280×800 LVDS display with PCAP multi-touch, 10.1″ 1280×800 display with PCAP multi-touch, Android Button board, etc… This is not only a development board, but it is also suitable for mass production, an industrial temperature version is available, and they can make custom versions on requests. Android 4.3 and Embedded Linux (Yocto) images, source and support are available for the board.

Nitrogen6 MAX is one of the few ARM based products available with 4GB RAM, and a usable mPCIe slot. Other boards such as Nitrogen6X and Sabre Lite also feature a PCIe slot but require a daughter board, and may not contains the full PCIE signal set, with USB signaling, allowing for 3G modems or WLAN mPCIe card.

The board is available for pre-order now for $249, with mass production scheduled for the first week of June. You can more information and/or pre-order on Boundary Devices’ Nitrogen6 MAX page.

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Raspberry Pi Compute Module is a $30 Raspberry Pi Compatible System-on-Module

April 9th, 2014 No comments

Albeit the initial goal of the Raspberry Pi board was to address computer science education, it has become extremely popular with hobbyists, has made its way in many different kinds of hardware, and is now clearly the number 1 low cost ARM Linux development board. The Raspberry Pi foundation has then decided to design and sell a system-on-module called Raspberry Pi Compute that people can use in actual products.

Raspberry Pi Compute (Left) and Raspberry Pi Board (Right)

Raspberry Pi Compute (Left) and Raspberry Pi Board (Right)

Since the module will be mostly software compatible with the original Raspberry Pi board, the specs are similar:

  • SoC – Broadcom BCM2835 ARM 11 processor @ 700 MHz with Videocore IV GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB RAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash
  • SoM Connector – DDR2 200-pins SODIMM
  • Dimensions – 67.6x30mm board which fits into a standard DDR2 SODIMM connector

The main difference is they’ve replaced the SD card slot found in the board, by an eMMC module which is more appropriate, and should provide better performance, for products. The foundation has also made a baseboard called “IO Board” for the Compute Module, in order to kickstart development while your custom PCB is being designed. It includes an HDMI output, a full sized USB port, 2 micro USB ports, some flat headers for camera and LCD displays, and two 2×30 pin headers to easily access the signals available via the SODIMM connectors.

Raspberry Pi IO Board and Compute Module

Raspberry Pi IO Board and Compute Module

The module will most probably support all distributions available for the RPi (Raspbian, Fedora, Arch Linux ARM,  etc..) as source code and tools should be identical too. The IO board will be open source. For now the foundation has only released the schematics of the IO Board and Compute module in PDF format, but more documents will be released soon.

A “Raspberry Pi Compute Module Development Kit” comprised of the Compute Module and IO Board should be available from RS and Element14 in June. The price of the devkit has not been disclosed, but the Compute Module will start selling in the summer for $30 per unit in batches of 100. Individual orders will also be possible at an higher price.

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Microsoft Announces Intel Shark Cove Windows Development Board

April 8th, 2014 No comments

There are now plenty of affordable ARM based Android and Linux development board which you can use to develop apps that access hardware drivers, and a few Intel based ones have also started to pop-up such as Galileo and Minnowboard MAX. The problem, for Microsoft, is that none of them currently support Windows. You could always use a PC to develop Windows apps, but this may become a problem once you start dealing with embedded devices and want to access undiscoverable buses such as GPIOs, serial interfaces and so on, as PCs are also protected by secure boot which limits developing and testing third-party drivers. So Microsoft has decided to join the affordable development boards bandwagon, starting with Intel Shark Cove development board for Windows developers.

Intel_SharK_Cove

Intel Shark Cove

There are very few technical details about the board, but we do know it will based on an Intel Atom processor, and provide access to GPIOs, I2C, I2S, UART, SDIO and USB.

Microsoft highlighted 5 key features of their upcoming development boards:

  • Affordable, easy to purchase over the Internet, and without any need for licensing, quotes or purchase orders.
  • Ability for developers to download a copy of Windows OS from MSDN.
  • Visual Studio support and Windows Development Kit (WDK) tools for developing drivers. Available free from MSDN.
  • Ability to test and certify drivers and devices against the developer’s tests and Microsoft device tests.
  • Ports for attaching common PC peripherals, including HDMI, USB, I2C, GPIO, UART and SDIO.

Intel Shark Cove (pictured above) does not exactly looks cheap, so I’m assuming Microsoft may sponsor it to keep it at a reasonable price (below $200?).

You can visit http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/hardwaredevboard to find out more about Microsoft’s development boards initiative.

Via Liliputing

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MYIR MYD-AM335X Development Boards & MYC-AM335X CPU Modules

April 4th, 2014 No comments

MYIR has recently introduced MYD-AM335X development boards and MYC-AM335X CPU modules powered by Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x ARM Cortex A8 SoCs, (AM3352, AM3354, AM3356, AM3357, AM3358, and AM3359) that come with 512 MB RAM, 512 MB Flash, and a Gigabit Ethernet PHY. The boards and modules target home automation, industrial automation, enterprise/educational tablets, portable navigation devices and networking applications.

MYC-AM335X CPU Modules

MYC-AM335X_CPU_Module
MYC-AM335X CoM specifications:

  • SoCTexas Instruments AM3352, AM3354, AM3356, AM3357, AM3358, AM3359  ARM Cortex-A8 up to 1GHz with SGX530 GPU (AM3354/AM3358/AM3359 only)
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 512MB NAND Flash
  • Connectivity – On-board Gigabit Ethernet PHY
  • Headers:
    • 2x  2.0mm pitch 60-pin expansion connectors to connect the SoM to a baseboard with the following signals: 2x USB2.0 OTG ports, 6x Serial ports, 2x I2C, 1x SPI, 7x ADC, 2x PWM, 3x SDIO
    • 1x 2.0mm pitch 26-pin expansion interface
    • 1x 2.54mm pitch 10-pin expansion interface
  • Misc – 1x power indicator (Red LED), 1x  user LED (Green)
  • Power supply – +3.3V/0.8A
  • Dimensions – 70×50 mm (6 layer PCB)
  • Operating Temperature Range – 0~70 Celsius (commercial grade) or -40~85 Celsius (industrial grade)

The company provides Linux 3.1.0, Android 2.3.4 and Windows Embedded CE 7 BSPs for these modules.

MYD-AM335X development boards

MYIR also provides a baseboard, which when used with their MYC-AM335x CoMs is called MYD-AM335x.

MYD-AM335X Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

MYD-AM335X Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

MYD-AM335X development boards comes with the following ports and headers:

  • Serial ports – 1x 3-wire RS232 Debug serial port (DB9), 1x 3-wire RS232 serial port (UART1), 1x RS485 (with isolation)
  • CAN – 1x CAN interface with isolation
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 Host ports, 1x USB 2.0 OTG port
  • Connectivity – 2x 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet interfaces
  • Storage – 1x TF card slot
  • Video Output – 1x HDMI interface, 1x LCD interface (16-bit true color, supports optional 4.3-inch and 7-inch TFT LCD), 1x 4-wire resistive touch screen interface
  • Audio I/Os – 1x Audio input port (3.5mm jack), 1x Stereo Audio output port (3.5mm jack),
  • Expansion headers – 2 x 2.0mm 20-pin expansion connectors with 7x ADC, 1x SPI, 2x I2C, 4x UART
  • Misc – 1x reset button, 3x user buttons, 1x power indicator (Red LED)
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A
  • Dimensions – 130 mm x 100mm (4 layer PCB)

The board is sold as part of MYD-AM335X development kit that also includes  an Ethernet cable, a USB cable, a 5V power adapter, and a product DVD. Optional 4.3″ or 7″ LCD/TSP are also available.

The development kits and CPU modules are available now starting at $68 per unit for the CoM and $139 for the development board per 1k order. You can visit MYIR’s MYC-AM335X CPU module page for more information about the CoMs and development boards.

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Novena Open Source Hardware ARM Laptop Gets Crowdfunded for $1995

April 4th, 2014 2 comments

In 2012, Andrew Huang (“Bunnie”) decided to build an open source hardware and software laptop codenamed Novena powered by Freescale i.MX6 as a side project. The goal of the project was to be fully open source, both in terms of hardware and software, and the components have been selected so that the datasheets can be downloaded without NDA. Design has now been completed, and a crowdfunding campaign has now been launched on Crowd Supply, but since finding low cost part was not priority, you’ll have to fork $1,995 to get the complete laptop, $1,195 will get you the desktop version, and $500 the motherboard only. There’s also a version of the laptop called “Heirloom Laptop” with a hand-crafted wood and aluminum case that goes for $5,000.

Novena_Open_Source_Hardware_Laptop

Novena Laptop

Let’s go through the board specs first:

  • SoC – Freescale iMX6 Quad-core Cortex A9 CPU with NEON FPU @ 1.2 GHz. – NDA-free datasheet and programming manual
  • System Memory – 64-bit, DDR3-1066 SO-DIMM slot. 4GB DDR3 SO-DIMM will be installed in the shipped products.
  • Storage – Boots from microSD firmware, SATA-II (3Gbps) connector
  • Internal ports & sensors:
    • mini PCI-express slot
    • UIM slot for mPCIx mobile data card support
    • Dual-channel LVDS LCD connector with USB2.0 side-channel for a display-side camera
    • Resistive touchscreen controller
    • Stereo 1.1W, 8-ohm internal speaker connectors
    • 2x USB2.0 internal connectors for keyboard and mouse/trackpad
    • Digital microphone (optional, not populated by default)
    • 3-axis accelerometer
    • 3x internal UART ports
  • External ports:
    • HDMI
    • SD card reader
    • headphone + mic port (compatible with most mobile phone headsets, supports sensing in-line cable buttons)
    • 2x USB 2.0 ports, supporting high-current (1.5A) device charging
    • 1Gbit ethernet
  • Other features:
    • 100 Mbit ethernet – dual Ethernet capability allows laptop to be used as an in-line packet filter or router
    • USB OTG – enables laptop to spoof/fuzz ethernet, serial, etc. over USB via gadget interface to other USB hosts
    • Utility serial EEPROM – for storing crash logs and other bits of handy data
    • Spartan-6 CSG324-packaged FPGA – has several interfaces to the CPU, including a 2Gbit/s (peak) RAM-like bus — for your bitcoin mining needs. Or whatever else you might want to toss in an FPGA.
    • High-speed I/O expansion header – useful for implementing a wide variety of functions, from simple GPIO breakouts to high-performance analog data sampling front-ends

Beside the 4GB RAM, the board with also come with a microSD card with basic Debian install, Ath9k (blob-free firmware) mPCIe wifi card, 802.11n b/g 1T1R and a 16V, 3.75A power supply (100-240V 50/60Hz input).

The desktop version will come with a gen-2 hacker case, a 13.3″ TFT  LCD (1080P), an LVDS to eDP adapter board, and some other accessories such as cables.

The laptop version will features all hardware from the desktop version but add a battery controller board, a 240 GB SSD, a 3000mAh 3-cell lithium battery pack, measure 330 mm x 225 mm x 27mm and weight 1.36 kg. The keyboard is not included.

$5,000 Heirloom Laptop

$5,000 Heirloom Laptop

Since these laptops and desktop PC are fully open source, you can download the hardware design files, get the source code, and build the Linux distribution yourself without binary blobs.

The board should ship in November 2014, the All-in-one desktop in December 2014, the laptop in January 2015, and Heirloom laptop in February 2015.

Via Liliputing

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pcDuino3 Development Board Features AllWinner A20 SoC, Arduino Headers

April 2nd, 2014 No comments

The first pcDuino board powered by AllWinner A10 has been available for about a year, later last year pcDuino V2 was released with a built-in Wi-Fi modules and mechanically and software compatible Arduino headers, and now pcDuino3 has been announced in a form factor similar to pcDuino V2 board but replacing AllWinner A10 Cortex A8 SoC with AllWinner A20 dual core Cortex A7, and improving overall specs such as a faster Ethernet, the addition of a SATA port, and LiPo support.

pcDuino3 Board (Click to Enlarge)

pcDuino3 Board (Click to Enlarge)

pcDuino3 specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A20 dual core ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.0 GHz, with Mali 400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DRAM
  • Storage – 4GB NAND Flash, SATA connector, and microSD card slot (up to 32GB)
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 with HDCP support, LVDS header
  • Audio Out -  3.5mm analog audio interface, I2S stereo digital audio interface
  • Connectivity – WiFi, Gigabit Ethernet
  • USB – 1x USB host, 1x USB OTG
  • Expansion Headers – Arduino UNO extension interface with 14xGPIO, 2xPWM, 6xADC, 1xUART, 1xSPI, 1xI2C.
  • Camera – MIPI camera support
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power – 5V, 2000mA, support for Li-Po Battery
  • Dimensions – 121mm x 65mm

The board also called “pcDuino Dual core” will come with support for Ubuntu 12.04 and Android 4.2, but you’ll be able to run any Linux distributions, with some caveats related to GPU and VPU support in Linux, although this may be fixed overtime thanks to work from linux-sunxi community.

The company also provides an API to control the signal available via the Arduino heders (UART, ADC, PWM, GPIO, I2C, SPI), and you should be able to use Arduino shields that are compatible with Arduino UNO.

The board is available now, and can be purchase starting from $77 via sites Linksprite or Sainsmart. Price may or may not include shipping depending on the destination. Price looks OK, as the specs place the board between Cubieboard2 ($59) and Cubietruck ($89) both featuring AllWinner A20 with a different set of hardware features. You can get more information on pcDuino.com, and more pictures and a pcDuino V2 vs pcDuino3 comparison tablet are also available on Sainsmart blog.

Via Liliputing

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$99 MinnowBoard MAX Development Board Powered by Intel Bay Trail-I SoC

April 1st, 2014 8 comments

When Intel released the original MinnowBoard which was a step in the right direction, but there were some complains, as the company had chosen to use an older Intel processor, and the price was much higher than most high performance low cost ARM development boards. MinnowBoard MAX (aka Minnow2 Board) fixes all that, as it features the latest Intel Bay Trail-I (E3800 series) processor, and costs as low as $99 for the single core version, and $129 for the dual core version.

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

Let’s jump directly to the specifications:

  • SoC – 64-bit Intel Atom E3815 (single-core, 1.46 GHz) or Atom E3825 (dual-core, 1.33 GHz) both with integrated Intel HD Graphics coming with Open Source hardware-accelerated drivers for Linux OS
  • System Memory – 1GB ($99 model) or 2GB ($129 model) DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 1x Micro SD card slot, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 8 MB SPI Flash for firmware (UEFI)
  • Video Output – micro HDMI connector
  • Audio Output
    • HDMI (digital)
    • Analog audio to become available via a separate Lure, the name for MinnowBoard expansion boards, which will be sold separately –
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet RJ-45 connector
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Debugging & Programming – Serial debug via FTDI cable (sold separately), programming header compatible with Dedi-Prog programmer, and JTAG via high-speed expansion port.
  • Expansion headers
    • Low-speed expansion port – 2×13 (26-pin) male 0.1″ pin header with access to SPI, I2C, I2S Audio, 2x UARTs (TTL-level), 8x GPIO (including 2x supporting PWM), +5V, and GND
    • High-speed expansion port -  60-pin, high-density connector with access to 1x PCIe Gen 2.0 Lane, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 1x USB 2.0 host, I2C, GPIO, JTAG, +5V, and GND
  • Dimensions – 99 x 74mm
  • Temperature Range -  0 – 70 deg C. Industrial temperature range may also be also available, but price will be higher, and has not been disclosed.
  • Power – 5V DC (Sold separately)

The board will run Debian GNU/Linux, Android 4.4 Kitkat, and be supported by the Yocto Project. It will boot with UEFI firmware stored in the 8MB SPI flash. The specifications also mention Intel HD graphics will be supported in Linux with open source graphics drivers, something that’s almost impossible to find for ARM development boards, although there has been some progress recently with the Raspberry Pi and Nvidia Tegra K1.  It will be an open source hardware board, and design files will be made available under Creative Commons licensing within weeks of production boards being available at distributors.

MinnowBoard MAX competes directly with quad core ARM Cortex A9 development board such as HardKernel ODROID, Wandboard, and so on, that sells for about the same price. We’ll need to check benchmarks to get a better idea of the performance.

The boards are scheduled to be manufactured by CircuitCo by the end of June 2014. You can’t pre-order them just yet, and they will be available through various distributors.  if you happen to be in EE Live! in San Jose, you can see a working demo with MinnowBoard MAX on booth #916.

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