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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

Raspberry Pi Model B+ with 4 USB Ports, a micro SD Slot, and More GPIOs Coming Soon

July 13th, 2014 21 comments

With over 3 million boards sold, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM Linux board on the market, but people are often asking for hardware upgrades with a faster processor, more RAM and so on. The good news is that a new Raspberry Pi board seems on the way, but since the real competitive of the Raspberry Pi is not the cheap hardware only, but software support and the community around the little ARM board. So instead of designing of completely new board, they’ve kept Broadcom BCM2835 and 512MB RAM, and mostly made some changes to the ports, and form factor.

Raspberry Pi Model B+ (Click to Enlarge)

Raspberry Pi Model B+ (Click to Enlarge)

Since the board has not been officially announced just yet, the full details are available, but according to various reports, the specs should be as follows:

  • SoC – Broadcom BCM2835 ARM11 processor @ 700MHz with VideoCore IV GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB SDRAM (PoP)
  • Storage – micro SD card slot (push release type)
  • Video & Audio Output – HDMI and AV via 3.5mm jack.
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 ports, 1x micro USB for power
  • Expansion
    • 2×20 pin headerfor GIO
    • Camera header (MIPI CSI?)
    • Display header (MIPI DSI?)
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port.

Raspberry_Pi-Model_B+_Board

The new Raspberry Pi appears to be better suited for enclosure thanks to the placements of the various ports, and four mounting holes. It loses the RCA connector, but the 3.5mm jack appears to combine both audio and video. The SD card is replaced by a micro SD card, and instead of just 2 USB ports, it gets 4 USB ports via Microchip LAN9514 USB to Ethernet chip. There are also report of a better audio codec being used, but it’s nowhere to be seem on the picture, and possibly soldered at the back of the board.

Raspberry Pi Model B+ was first spotted by AppDated on European retail site Reichelt, but the page have now been remove, and it was not clear whether it was an official Raspberry Pi foundation product or made independently by a third party. But I found the first picture above in Google Cache, and it looks pretty official, as it will be apparently sold by Element14, one of the main Raspberry Pi sellers, and there’s a “Raspberry Pi” copyright on the board’s silkscreen.

Since it’s a leak, there’s obviously no availability or pricing information available.

Via Liliputing

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33 Euros Olimex A20-OLinuXino-LIME Open Source Hardware Board Supports Linux and Android

July 9th, 2014 No comments

Last year, Olimex launched A10-OLinuxXino-LIME powered by AllWinner A10, and it became quite popular due to its Linux and Android support, its open source hardware, and a price tag of just 30 Euros that made it cost competitive with BeagleBone Black and Raspberry Pi boards. The company has now designed an upgrade with A20-OLinuXino-LIME powered by AllWinner A20 dual core Cortex A7 processor, that sells for just 3 Euros more.

A20-OlinuXino-LINE

A20-OLinuXino-LIME specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A20 dual core ARM Cortex-A7 @ 1GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB DDR3
  • Storage – microSD card slot, SATA, and optional 4GB NAND Flash
  • Video Output – HDMI 1080p
  • USB -  USB-OTG + 2x USB Hosts
  • Connectivity – 10/100Mbit Ethernet
  • Expansions – 200 GPIOs on 0.05″ connectors
  • Misc – Lipo battery management and connector, buttons
  • Power – 5V
  • Dimensions – 84 x 60 mm

A20-OlinuXino-LIMEThe specifications are exactly the same expect for the processor. The company will provide images and source code for Android 4.2.2 and Debian. Source samples, some tools, and hardware designs file are available in Olimex’s OlinuXino github repo. You’ve find any A20-OLinuXino-LIME hardware design files directly, simply because the board is the same for A10-OLinuXino–LIME as AllWinner A10 and A20 are pin-2-pin compatible. There’s supposed to be a Wiki for A20-OlinuXino-LIME (currently empty), but this will be very similar to the A10 version. U-boot and Linux kernel source code are mostly leveraging the work done by linux-sunix community.

Two versions of the board are now available: A20-OLinuXino-LIME without flash (boot from micro SD card) for 33 Euros ($45), and A20-OLinuXino-LIME-4GB that will include a 4GB NAND flash and sell for 43 Euros ($59).

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Hardkernel Unveils $179 ODROID-XU3 Development Board Powered by Samsung Exynos 5422 SoC

July 8th, 2014 8 comments

Remember ODROID-XU2 development board based on Exynos 5420? The bad news is that it apparently got scrapped, but the good news is that it gave birth to ODROID-XU3 development board powered by the latest Samsung Exynos 5422 octa core big.LITTLE SoC with support for Ubuntu 14.04 and Android 4.4, including GPU 3D acceleration with the company promising a full desktop experience in Ubuntu.

ODROID-XU3ODROID-XU3 specifications:

  • SoC – Samsung Exynos 5422 quad core ARM Cortex-A15 @ 2.0GHz+ quad core ARM Cortex-A7 @ 1.4GHz with Mali-T628 MP6 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 3.0 / 2.0 / 1.1 and OpenCL 1.1 Full profile
  • System Memory – 2GB LPDDR3 RAM PoP (933Mhz, 14.9GB/s memory bandwidth, 2x32bit bus)
  • Storage – Micro SD slot (up to 64GB) + eMMC 5.0 module socket (16, 32, or 64GB module available)
  • Video Output – micro HDMI (Up to 1080p) and DisplayPort (up to 2160p)
  • Audio Output – micro HDMI and 3.5mm headphone jack
  • Network Connectivity – 10/100Mbps Ethernet (Via LAN95144 USB + Ethernet controller)
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x USB 3.0 micro USB OTG port, 4x USB 2.0 ports
  • Expansion – 30-pin header for access to GPIO, IRQ, SPI and ADC signals
  • Debugging – Serial console header
  • Misc – Accurate current sensors and voltage sensors for energy measurement, Power and RGB LEDs, cooling fan header
  • Power Supply – 5V/4A power adapter using 5.5/2.1mm barrel.
  • Dimensions – PCBA: 94x70x18mm; Enclosure: 98x74x29mm
ODROID-XU3 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

ODROID-XU3 Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The company can also provide USB modules / dongles for optical S/PDIF output, Gigabit Ethernet (USB 3.0 to Ethernet adapter), Wi-Fi 802.11n/g/n 1T1R with antenna, and 2.5″/3.5″ SATA drives (USB 3.0 to SATA III adapter).  Hardkernel will provide Ubuntu 14.04 support with OpenGL ES + OpenCL support, and Android 4.4.2 both based on Linux kernel 3.10 LTS, and the source code will soon be available on their github account. This is also the first ODROID board that supports Heterogeneous Multi-Processing / Global Task Scheduling implementation of big.LITTLE processing. You can get an overview of the board and see Ubuntu 14.04 running OpenGL ES 3.0 demo, and playing a windowed YouTube video – which makes me think hardware video decoding may not be implemented yet – in the video below.

ODROID-XU3 comes with a plastic case, an active cooler and a 5V/4A power adapter, and you get pre-order it for $179 + shipping on Hardkernel website with delivery schedule for the 18th of August 2014. There’s no internal storage with the board so you’ll need a micro SD card (Class 10 strongly recommended), or even better purchased one of the eMMC module with the board. The 16GB eMMC sells for $39 and includes an adapter to connect it to your PC. You can get more information, and/or purchase the board and a few of its 23 accessories on Hardkernel’s ODROID-XU3 product page.

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Inforce Computing IFC6540 Pico-ITX Board Features Qualcomm Snapdragon 805, High Speed Interfaces

July 6th, 2014 5 comments

Inforce Computing has been working the successor of their IF6410 development board based on Snapdragon S4 Pro SoC with IFC6540, another tiny board for Linux and Android, yet with interesting features such as 802.11ac, SATA III, USB 3.0 host and device connectors, and powered by the latest Snapdragon 805 quad core krait processor.
IFC6440_Development_Board
IFC6540 specifications:

  • SoC- Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 APQ8084 Quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz with 2MB L2 cache, Adreno 420 GPU with OpenGL ES 2.0 and 3.0, OpenCL, and RenderScript support.
  • System Memory – 2 GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC 4.5 (eMMC 5.0 also supported), 1 micro SD slot, and 1x SATA 3 interface
  • Connectivity
    • 802.11ac WiFi /ac (2.4 GHz/5 GH) + Bluetooth 4.1 via QCA6174
    • 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet via AR8151
    • GPS via QCA1530 + GPS antenna connector
  • Video and Audio Interfaces
    • 1 x HDMI (Type D)
    • Dual MIPI-DSI and Touch Screen
    • 3.5mm headphone and Line In audio jacks
  • Camera – 3 x MIPI-CSI
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port,  1 x USB 3.0 micro B (device mode only), 1 x USB 3.0 type A (host mode only)
  • Sensor – LMS330 Accel/Gyro
  • Debugging – 1x JTAG, 1x RS-232
  • Expansion – 1x 40-pin header with access to I2C, SPI, UART, GPIOs, and MPPs
  • Misc – Power, and Vol+/- buttons.
  • Power Supply – +12V (3A recommended)
  • Dimensions -  10cm x 7cm (Pico-ITX)
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0 to 70 C; Storage: -20 to 80 C
  • Relative Humidity -  5 to 95% non-condensing
  • RoHS and WEE compliant

IFC6540_Block_DiagramThe company will provide an Android 4.4 Kitkat BSP, but a Fedora port might also be expected, as there’s one for IFC6410 using Freedeno drivers. The board can be used for development and in actual products for applications such as gaming, robotics, video conferencing, medical products, high end video, and video analytics. Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 is one of the few SoCs that fully support 4K: 4K output, 4K video playback, and 4K video recording. It also supports HEVC/H.265 4K playback, but I don’t think it can do 4K HEVC recording (TBC).

The board will be available as a development kit in Q3 2014 for $249 according to the product brief. There’s also a product page, which seems work in progress (specs incomplete), and I haven’t been able to try to order, so it does not look quite ready for taking orders just yet. The board appears to be manufactured in the USA,  if the “MADE IN USA” marking at the back of the board is any indication…

Via Google+.

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Linaro Announces 64-bit ARM Android Port on Juno ARM Development Platform

July 3rd, 2014 2 comments

Last week, Linaro 14.06 was released and one of the highlights was Android booting on ARMv8 models, but the organization has actually ported Android to a new 64-bit ARM platform. Juno ARM Development Platform is actually software development platform for ARMv8-A, including Juno Versatile Express board and an ARMv8-A reference software port developed by Linaro.

Juno Versatile Express Board (Click to Enlarge)

Juno Versatile Express Board (Click to Enlarge)

Juno VExpress Board has the following key hardware features:

Juno SoC Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Juno SoC Simplified Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

  • SoC – 2x ARM Cortex A57 cores @ 1.1 GHz (2MB L2 cache), 4x Cortex A53 cores @ 850 MHz (1MB L2 cache) in big.LITTLE configuration with Mali-T624 GPU @ 600 MHz. Compliant with SBSA specifications Level 1.
  • I/O FPGA – Xilinx SPARTAN-6
  • MCU – ARM Cortex M3 for Motherboard Configuration Controller (MCC)
  • System Memory – 8GB DDR3L @ 1600 MHz
  • Storage – User and configuration micro SD card lots, 64MB NOR flash, configuration EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet + 10M “configuration” Ethernet
  • Video Output – 2x HDMI
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host port + “configuration USB”
  • Serial – 2x UART (1x DB9 interface)
  • Debugging – P-JTAG (Processor CoreSight debug) port, coresight trace port
  • Expansion – 2 headers (HDRX and HDRY) for LogicTile Express FPGA daughterboard
  • Misc – Push buttons, LEDs, energy monitors, etc…

The hardware enables development of ARMv8-A AArch64 kernel and tools, secure OS & hypervisors through ARM Trusted Firmware, 3D graphics and GPU compute with native big.LITTLE and Mali support, Middleware & file systems porting and optimization to 64-bit, and real-time debug, trace and performance tuning with CoreSight technology. Expansion is also provided with LogicTile Express 20MG FPGA board that connects directly to the platform and can be used for driver development and prototyping.

Juno Board Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Juno Board Block Diagram

This type of board is not for everybody, and mostly reserved to silicon vendors, and people working on ARMv8 software development that can’t wait for actual silicon. Juno SoC is not optimized for performance (see relatively low frequencies) and most probably not for power consumption, it’s just to let people run and optimize software for ARMv8. The other reason it’s not for everyone is the price which should be several thousand dollars, and I would not be surprised if this board cost over $10,000, as older versatile express board sell for about $6,000. You can find more details on ARM’s Juno product page.

Linaro’s ARMv8 ports are based on Linux kernel 3.10 (Linaro Stable Kernel), and compiled with GCC 4.9 and can run both Juno and ARMv8 fast models. You can download ARMv8 ports for OpenEmbedded and Android Open Source Project (AOSP).

The OpenEmbedded ARMv8 release supports on-chip USB, non-secure UART, HDMI output, keyboard and mouse functionality of P/S2, and Ethernet. The big.LITTLE multiprocessing implementation supports all 6 cores (optimizations still required), boot is done via UEFI using the NOR flash, USB mass storage, or Ethernet, ARM trusted firmware and SCP firmware are both supported.

The Android ARMv8 release supports all OpenEmbedded features, and comes with a unified kernel and kernel config for Android and Linux, and the AOSP file system based on a snapshot from the 1st of June 2014, with ART Runtime enabled as default and booting in 64-bit primary mode, GPU and HDLCD support, although there are still some bugs leading to visual artifacts.

In theory, it should be possible to run Android or OpenEmbedded ARMv8 ports on any computers using ARMv8 fast models, but be prepared to be very very patient. I won’t try it…

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SolidRun HummingBoard Raspberry Pi-Like Board is Now Available for $45 and Up

July 2nd, 2014 2 comments

HummingBoard is a board made by SolidRun that’s mechanically compatible with the Raspberry Pi, and offering the same expansions connectors, and a few extras. The board is comprised of a baseboard and a microSoM powered by Freescale i.MX6 Solo, Dual Lite or Dual. At first it looked like an internal project,  but the board went viral together with the Banana Pi, and the company has now announced availability for the HummingBoard with pricing starting at $45 for the single core version up to $100 for the dual core version with extra options.

HummingBoard-i2

HummingBoard-i2

There are currently three models:

  • HummingBoard-i1 ($44.90) – Freescale i.MX6 Solo with GC880 GPU, 512 MB RAM, 10/100M Ethernet
  • HummingBoard-i2 ($74.99) – Freescale i.MX6 Dual Lite with GC880 GPU, 1GB RAM, 10/100M Ethernet
  • HummingBoard-i2ex ($99.99) – Freescale i.MX6 Dual with GC2000 GPU, 1GB RAM, Gigabit Ethernet, LVDS output, mSATA II interface, PCI Express Gen 2 slot, RTC with baterry backup, and IR receiver

All three boards also come with an HDMI video output, two powered USB ports, a 2-Lane CSI-2 camera interface, a microSD interface, a coaxial S/PDIF output, and the same GPIO header as the Raspberry Pi. They sell with options such as 110V or 220V power adapters, or a micro SD card.Just like the Raspberry Pi, there’s no internal storage (NAND or eMMC), and instead the board boots from a micro SD card with operating systems such as Android, Ubuntu, and Debian, and it’s also likely there will be an XBMC port. The company also has Micro-SOM i4Pro with Freescale i.MX6 Quad but for some reasons (thermal dissipation?) it is not included in a HummingBoard-i4, but it can be found in Cubox-i4Pro.

HummingBoard Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

HummingBoard Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The company has uploaded a promo video comparing their HummingBoard to the Raspberry Pi.

It offers a more powerful hardware with faster processing power and better peripherals, more operating systems choices including Ubuntu and Android which are not available for the Raspberry Pi, but you can’t expect the same level of software support and community as the original Raspberry Pi, and although some Raspberry Pi accessories (enclosures and expansion board) will work on the HummingBoard, you can’t expect them to all work at least without some serious software work.

You can find more information and/or purchase a board on SolidRun’s HummingBoard product page.

Thanks to dhead666 for the tip.

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Pictures and Specs for CubieBoard 8 Development Board Powered by AllWinner A80 SoC

July 1st, 2014 14 comments

Back in April, AllWinner announced partnerships with Linksprite and CubieTech for respectively PcDuino 8 and Cubieboard 8 development boards to feature  AllWinner A80 octa core ARM Cortex 15/A7 big.little SoC. However, at the time all we got was some photo-shopped pictures of older versions of the boards with an A80 processor pasted by graphics designers. Some pictures of Cubieboard 8 have now surfaced, and they are clear enough so that we can start to get most of the specs.

Cubieboard 8 (Click to Enlarge)

Cubieboard 8 (Click to Enlarge)

Here are Cubieboard 8 specifications derived from the pictures (incomplete because we don’t have pictures of the back of the board):

  • SoC – AllWinner A80 octa core big.LITTLE processor with 4 ARM Cortex A15 cores, 4 Cortex A7 cores, and Imagination PowerVR G6200 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3 (4x SKhynix H5TQ4G83AFR – 4Gbit RAM chips) – TBC in case they’ve added more RAM chips at the back, unlikely IMHO.
  • Storage – TBD (At the back?) + SD Card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI and VGA
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, Line In, Line Out, and optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6330 module)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x Micro-B USB 3.0 port
  • Debugging – UART close to VGA port (TBC)
  • Expansion Header – 20 pin header
  • Misc – RTC battery slot, 2 LEDs, 3 push buttons
  • Power – Round DC power jack (5V?)
Top View (Click to Enlarge)

Top View (Click to Enlarge)

That’s about all we know for now. AllWinner announced support for Android, Chrome OS (Chromium OS?), Ubuntu, Firefox OS, and Windows RT, so hopefully most will also be available with the board expect probably Windows RT, and possibly Chrome OS. Price and availability are unknown, but since AllWinner A80 MP is supposed to start this month, and in a previous interview, a $100 price target had been talked about, I’m really expecting the board to be available for around $100 by the end of this month.

Thanks to Jibril!

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