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Posts Tagged ‘development board’

AMD Announces Availability of their $3,000 Opteron A1100-Series 64-bit ARM Development Kit

July 31st, 2014 3 comments

AMD Opteron A1100 Server SoCs, codenamed “Seattle”, come with four to eight ARM Cortex A57 cores, and earlier this year, the company unveiled both the processors and a development kit. You can now apply for “AMD Opteron A1100 Series 64-bit ARM developers kit”, and if you’re selected, you’ll “just” need to pay $2,999 to receive the board and related tools. The kit targets software and hardware developers, as well as early adopters in large datacenters.

AMD_Opteron_A1110_Development_BoardAMD Opteron A1100 Board hardware specifications:

  • SoC – ARM Opeteron A1000 with 4 ARM Cortex-A57 cores
  • System Memory – 2x Registered DIMM with 16 GB of DDR3 DRAM (upgradeable to 128GB)
  • Storage – 8 Serial-ATA connectors
  • Connectivity – Not mentioned, but there seems to be an RJ45 port on the pic, and another SFP cage, both probably 10 Gbit Ethernet since it’s the speed supported by Opteron A1100.
  • Expansion slots – PCI Express connectors configurable as a single x8 or dual x4 ports
  • Dimensions – Micro ATX form factor (244 × 244 mm)
  • Power – Compatibility with standard power supplies

The kit also includes a standard UEFI boot environment, a Linux environment based on “Fedora technology from the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora community”, a standard Linux GNU (cross and native) toolchains, device drivers, apache web server, MySQL database engine, and PHP scripting language for developing robust Web serving applications, and Java 7 & 8.

Thanks to Peter, via AMD.

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Sharks Cove Intel Atom Bay Trail-T Development Board for Windows and Android is Now Available for $299

July 30th, 2014 No comments

When Intel announced their Sharks Cove development board, they did not provide that much information, except for the fact that it aimed at Windows development, it would be easy to buy for hobbyist, and provided a picture of the board. The board has now been launched, is available for pre-order for $299, and technical details have been published.

Intel_Sharks_CoveIntel Sharks Cove specifications:

  • Soc – Intel ATOM Processor Z3735G, 2M Cache, 4 Core, @ 1.33GHz (Burst frequency: 1.88GHz) with Intel HD Graphics
  • System Memory – 1GB 1×32 DDR3L-RS-1333
  • Storage – 16GB EMMC 4.5, micro SD Card slot, 2MP SPI NOR
  • Video Output / Display – HDMI connector and MIPI Display Connector
  • Audio – Realtek ALC5640 audio codec, 3.5mm stereo headphone jack, header for speaker, and on-board digital mic
  • Connectivity – None. But Ethernet or WiFi can be added through USB.
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 type A connector, 1x micro USB type A/B for debugging, 1x micro USB type A/B for power
  • Debugging – micro USB, SPI debug programming header, LED display
  • Expansion headers:
    • 12x 10-pin header connectors for god knows what various I/Os (GPIO, I2C, USB, Touch, UART, SDIO…)
    • 1x 20-pin header for sensors
    • 2x 60-pin MIPI connector for display and camera
    • 5x 4-pin headers for power
  • Misc – Power, Vol -/+, rotation, and home screen buttons. DIP swtiches to disable/enable features
  • Power – 5V/2.5A via power barrel or micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 4″ x 6″ (10.16 x 15.24 cm) type 3 board with 4 stand-offs

The board also features Intel UEFI BIOS, and although it won’t ship pre-loaded with an image, Microsoft provides either Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry Pro Evaluation (180-day free trial, aka evaluation version) or Windows Embedded 8.1 Industry Pro with Update (x86)  (Requires an MSDN subscription, aka full version). The board can also support Android, but details haven’t been provided yet.

Sharks Cove Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Sharks Cove Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

As you can see from the picture, hardware features and price, it is not a typical low cost development board. It targets  “hardware developers enabling devices for x86 based tablets” and “Developers of new products and market segments for Atom”.

You can read the full specs (PDF – 36 pages), and/or the getting started guide (Windows 8.1) for more information. The official website is Sharkscove.org.

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Lemaker.org is Giving Away Banana Pi Development Boards to Developers and Fans

July 26th, 2014 1 comment

Banana Pi is a development board powered by AllWinner A20 dual core SoC with 1GB RAM, and with expansion headers and a form factor very similar to the Raspberry Pi. It can run Debian, Lubuntu, Android 4.2, Arch Linux ARM, Scratch OS, and OpenSuse, but Lemarker.org community would like more educational materials such as open source software or hardware projects, tutorials, etc.., so they’ve launched a program to give away boards to developers and people who can help writing and maintaining documentation.
Banana_Pi_Board

There are three categories of projects:

  • STEAM – “Science, Technology, Engineering, Art & Mathematics” educational, open source projects running on the the Banana Pi
  • Hardware or Software Project -  Open source projects based on Banana Pi which could be helpful to the community, including open source hardware peripherals projects;
  • Banana Pi Fans – You don’t need to be as technical as for the two others categories, but you must be committed to write tutorials or user guides, participate to the Wiki, upload video guides, etc.., under CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

To apply, you just need to create a poll in the forums in the category that matches your project, describe the project, the licenses used, links to existing documentation if any, etc…Other members of the community can then comment or/and vote for your project for two weeks, and you’ll be send a board if accepted.Current projects include a Self-Managing Uninterruptible Power Supply for Banana Pi, and WTherm web connected thermostat.

Selected applicants will have to bear the cost of shipping via SF-Express, DHL (Priority), UPS, FedEx, or China Post depending on the applicant’s preference.

All details and conditions are available on Apply for Banana Pi page.

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Firefly-RK3288 Development Board To Support Android and Lubuntu

July 25th, 2014 16 comments

We’ve already got a long list of upcoming Rockchip RK3288 based Android media players, but no low cost development boards have been announced to date. We can certainly expect a Radxa Rock 2 board with the Cortex A17 processor, but it might not be the only one, as Firefly-RK3288 development board powered by Rockchip RK3288 is currently being developed by another Chinese team.

Firefly-RK3288 (Click to Enlarge... a bit)

Firefly-RK3288 Development Board (Click to Enlarge… a bit)

Current specifications for Firefly-RK3288 board:

  • SoC – Rockchip 3288 quad core ARM Cortex A17 up to 1.8 GHz with Mali-T764 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, and OpenCL 1.1
  • System Memory – 2G DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash + micro SD slot
  • Video I/O
    • HDMI 2.0 up to 3840×2160@60p
    • VGA out (D-SUB connector)
    • VGA in is available via the expansion headers.
    • LCD, MIPI and LVDS
  • Audio Output / Input – HDMI, optical S/PDIF, microphone header, and built-in MIC
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, dual band 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi with external antenna, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG
  • Expansion Headers – 2x 38-pin headers with access to SPI, UART, EDP, ADC, GPIO, I2C, VGA=IN, LVDS, MIPI, 3.3V, 5V, and GND signals.
  • Power Supply – TBC
  • Dimensions – 118 x 83 mm

Firefly-RK3288_connectorsThe developers told me it would be an open hardware project, but I’m not sure it will be 100% open source hardware, but at least they seem committed to release the hardware schematics, component’s placement file, and components’ datasheets. Hardware design and debugging have just been completed, and they have not reached the mass production stage just yet, which also means there’s no price information either. They will support Android 4.4 and Ubuntu for the board, and the SDKs, tutorial and hardware files will all be available from their website in August.

That website is not online yet (and I don’t even know the domain name), but the board can be found on oschina, and the development followed on TeeFirefly’s Twitter and Facebook accounts.

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Freescale WaRPBoard Reference Platform for Wearables is Now Available for Pre-order

July 25th, 2014 1 comment

Back in January, Freescale announced WaRP (Wearable Reference Platform) comprised of the WaRPboard, a tiny board based on Freescale i.MX 6SoloLite running Android, and a daughter board with KL16 Cortex M0+ MCU and several sensors. The company collaborated with Revolution Robotics for the hardware design, and Kynetics for the software, and the platform is now available for pre-order for $149, and a few more details have surfaced since my first article.

WaRPboard Connected to Daughter (center) and the Other side of WarRPBoard (Right) - Click to Enlarge

WaRPboard Connected to Daughtercard (center) and the Other side of WarRPBoard (Right) – Click to Enlarge

The hardware specifications of WaRP are as follows:

  • WaRPboard:
    • SoC – Freescale i.MX 6SoloLite Cortex A9 processor @ 1GHz with 2D graphics Vivante GC355 and  GC320 GPUs.
    • System Memory – LPDDR2 (Micron Multi-Chip Package)
    • Storage – 4Gbit eMMC  (Same Micron MCP chip as for RAM)
    • Connectivity – WLAN and Bluetooth 4.0 LE via Murata LBEH17YSHC
    • Display I/F:
      • MIPI DSI for LCD display + touchscreen
      • EPCD for E-Ink Display
    • Sensors – Xtrinsic FXOS8700CQ, 6-Axis Sensor with Integrated Linear Accelerometer and Magnetometer.
  • Daughtercard:
    • MCU – Freescale Kinertis KL16 Cortex M0+ MCU
    • Sensors – Xtrinsic MMA955xL Motion-Sensing Pedometer
    • Misc – 2x user buttons
  • Power – Via micro USB, single cell 500 mAh LiPo battery connected to WaRPboard, or Wireless Charging via daughterboard

There are also two optional displays LCD LH154Q01 and E-ink ET017QC1 that will be available for the board.

WaRPboard + Daughterboard Block Diagram

WaRPboard + Daughter Board Block Diagram

The board can be used to develop applications for various type of wearables including activity trackers, sports/heart rate monitors, smartwatches, ECG monitoring, smart glasses, smart clothing, wearable imaging devices, augmented reality headsets, wearable computing and wearable healthcare devices.

Android 4.3 operating system will run on Freescale i.MX 6SoloLite, and a Standard Android SDK will be provided. At this time, there’s still not much other details about software,  firmware, hardware design files, and documentation, except the hardware and software will be full open sourced, development can be done with open source development tools without licensing fees needed, and all will be  managed via WaRPboard.org community.If you want more information or have questions, you may want to head over WaRPboard Google Group.

As mentioned on the introduction, the board can be pre-order for $149 now, and shipping is expected in September. Depending on your destination. shipping costs can be pretty expensive, as it would cost nearly $100 to ship to Thailand via UPS. The only other shipping option being to pick it up in Texas for free… I can’t find the optional displays in Boardzoo.

Thank you Nanik!

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PcDuino8 Octa-core Development Board Revealed (Video)

July 24th, 2014 9 comments

Two AllWinner A80 powered development boards are currently expected. We’ve already seen some pictures of the Cubieboard8, and today we can gt more details about PcDuino8 development board thanks to Charbax who visited Linksprite, and interviewed the company.

PcDuino8

Here are PcDuino8 (Beta) specifications based on the interview and pictures:

  • SoC – AllWinner A80 octa core big.LITTLE processor with 4 ARM Cortex A15 cores, 4 Cortex A7 cores, and Imagination PowerVR G6200 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB
  • Storage – 4GB flash + micro SD Card slot
  • Video Output – HDMI
  • Audio Output – HDMI, stereo audio jack
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6330 module)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x Micro-B USB 3.0 port
  • Debugging – 14-pin header for JTAG
  • Expansion Header – 32-pin header
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power – Round DC power jack (5V?)

The hardware specs are a bit lower compared to the Cubieboard8, notably when it comes to RAM, and USB ports. LinkSprite is currently working on Android and Debian for the board, but they also said some developers are also working on Chromium OS. The board is expected to be available next month, and they hope to keep the price below $100.

The video below is 19 minutes long, but only the first 1 minute and 30 seconds are about their new Octa-core board. The rest of the video includes:

  • History of PcDuino boards including a new PcDuino3 Nano soon to be available
  • A version of Scratch for PcDuino board with an hardware tab to program GPIOs using the program’s graphical user interface.
  • Quick demo of a Robot powered by a PcDuino board
  • PcDuino for education used in schools in Colorado, USA, Germany, and China. Resources are available at learn.linksprite.com
  • Visit of linksprite’s R&D office
  • Quick talk with the developer of Papilio DUO FPGA board, as it happens to be manufactured by Linksprite.

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Raspberry Pi Model B+ with 4 USB Ports, a micro SD Slot, and More GPIOs Coming Soon

July 13th, 2014 21 comments

With over 3 million boards sold, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM Linux board on the market, but people are often asking for hardware upgrades with a faster processor, more RAM and so on. The good news is that a new Raspberry Pi board seems on the way, but since the real competitive of the Raspberry Pi is not the cheap hardware only, but software support and the community around the little ARM board. So instead of designing of completely new board, they’ve kept Broadcom BCM2835 and 512MB RAM, and mostly made some changes to the ports, and form factor.

Raspberry Pi Model B+ (Click to Enlarge)

Raspberry Pi Model B+ (Click to Enlarge)

Since the board has not been officially announced just yet, the full details are available, but according to various reports, the specs should be as follows:

  • SoC – Broadcom BCM2835 ARM11 processor @ 700MHz with VideoCore IV GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB SDRAM (PoP)
  • Storage – micro SD card slot (push release type)
  • Video & Audio Output – HDMI and AV via 3.5mm jack.
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 ports, 1x micro USB for power
  • Expansion
    • 2×20 pin headerfor GIO
    • Camera header (MIPI CSI?)
    • Display header (MIPI DSI?)
  • Power – 5V via micro USB port.

Raspberry_Pi-Model_B+_Board

The new Raspberry Pi appears to be better suited for enclosure thanks to the placements of the various ports, and four mounting holes. It loses the RCA connector, but the 3.5mm jack appears to combine both audio and video. The SD card is replaced by a micro SD card, and instead of just 2 USB ports, it gets 4 USB ports via Microchip LAN9514 USB to Ethernet chip. There are also report of a better audio codec being used, but it’s nowhere to be seem on the picture, and possibly soldered at the back of the board.

Raspberry Pi Model B+ was first spotted by AppDated on European retail site Reichelt, but the page have now been remove, and it was not clear whether it was an official Raspberry Pi foundation product or made independently by a third party. But I found the first picture above in Google Cache, and it looks pretty official, as it will be apparently sold by Element14, one of the main Raspberry Pi sellers, and there’s a “Raspberry Pi” copyright on the board’s silkscreen.

Since it’s a leak, there’s obviously no availability or pricing information available.

Via Liliputing

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