Archive

Posts Tagged ‘development board’

$39 PcDuino3 Nano ARM Linux Development Board Features HDMI, SATA, Gigabit Ethernet, Arduino Headers…

September 18th, 2014 5 comments

Linksprite recently announced PcDuino3 Nano development board powered by AllWinner A20 dual core processor. PcDuino3 Nano is, as you can expect, a smaller and cheaper version the company’s PcDuino3 board without Wi-Fi module, LVDS header, and I2S interface. The board does not appear to support Li-Po batteries either, but it adds one extra USB host port compared to its big brother.

PcDuino3_Nano

pcDuino3 specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A20 dual core ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.0 GHz with Mali 400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DRAM
  • Storage – 4GB NAND Flash, SATA connector, and microSD card slot (up to 32GB)
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 with HDCP support
  • Audio Out – 3.5mm analog audio interface
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet
  • USB – 2x USB host, 1x USB OTG
  • Expansion Headers – Arduino UNO extension interface with 14xGPIO, 2xPWM, 6xADC, 1xUART, 1xSPI, 1xI2C.
  • Camera – MIPI camera support
  • Misc – IR receiver
  • Power – 5V, 2000mA
  • Dimensions – 91.4mm x 53.3mm (PcDuino3: 121mm x 65mm)

In some ways it’s similar to Cubieboard2 but in a smaller factor, with Gigabit Ethernet, but lacking the audio ports. The company still provide Ubuntu 12.04 and Android 4.2 images and source code for the board, as well as an API to control the I/O pins available on the Arduino headers (UART, ADC, PWM, GPIO, I2C, SPI).

PcDuino3 Nano can be purchased on Linksprite or Cutedigi for $39. Shipping is not included, and I got a ridiculous quote for UPS shipping to Thailand ($78) on Cutedigi, but USPS First Class is available on Linksprite for $6.75. You can also visit PcDuino3 Nano product page, and access the download, Wiki, and tutorial sections of the site to find out more.

Thanks to John for the tip.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Intrinsyc OPEN-Q 8084 Development Kit Powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 Processor

September 12th, 2014 4 comments

Inforce Computing IFC6540 was the first low cost development board powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 processor I discovered a few months ago, but is currently “for pre-approved customers only and have not yet been released to public”. Intrinsyc has now launched their own Snapdragon 805 development kit called OPEN-Q 8084 based on a mini-ITX carrier board, and a SoM with 3GB RAM, and 16GB eMMC. The board target applications include ruggedized tablets, digital signage, government/public safety, medical, robotics, wearable displays, video streaming/conferencing, gaming systems, and in-flight entertainment.

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

OPEN-Q 8084 Snapdragon 805 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Specifications of APQ8084 Open-Q System-on-Module:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 805 (APQ8084) quad core Krait 450 @ 2.5GHz, with Adreno 420 GPU @ 500MHz, Hexagon QDSP6 V5A (600MHz), and two ISPs for up to 55-megapixel stereoscopic 3D
  • System Memory – 3GB PoP LPDDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 5.0 flash, expandable to 64GB, micro SD signals, and SATA signals (via MXM connector)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (via MXM connector), 802.11a/b/g/n/ac WiFi (2.4GHz/5GHz) for 600Mbps throughput, Bluetooth 4.1
  • Other I/Os accessible via 314-pin MXM 3.0 edge connector:
    • PCIe
    • HDMI
    • SPI, I2C. I2S, GPIO
    • 3x MIPI CSI, 2x MIPI DSI
    • NFC, UIM
    • Slim bus
    • USB – 2x USB 2.0 (host and client),  2x USB 3.0 (host and client), USB HSIC
    • JTAG
    • Serial ports
  • Power +3.3V DC; PMIC supporting processor and peripheral LDOs, boost regulators as well as clock management and auxiliary signals.
  • Dimensions – 82 x 35mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 70°C

One of the advantages of Snapdragon 805 is its 4K/UHD capabilities including 4K capture with H.264/AVC format, 4K playback with H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC formats, and 4K UHD on-device display concurrent with 4K UHD output to HDTV.

Open-Q 8084 devkit mini-ITX + SoM has the following specs:

  • Processor, Memory, Storage and Connectivity – As listed forAPQ8084 Open-Q SoM with Snapdragon 805, 3GB RAM, 16 GB Flash, Wi-Fi…
  • External Storage – microSD slot, SATA 3.0 I/F
  • Connectivity – Apart from Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on the module, the carrier board adds a Gigabit Ethernet port, GPS with GLONASS and COMPASS support
  • Video Output
    • HDMI 1.4
    • 2x MIPI-DSI I/F with support for optional qHD LCD capacitive touchscreen
  • Camera I/F – 3x MIPI-CSI I/F with support for optional cameras
  • Audio – 5.1 channel, 3.5mm headphone output and microphone input jacks, 6 digital mics
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host port, 1x micro USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports.
  • Sensors – Optional compass, gyro, accelerometer
  • Debugging – JTAG and UART (DB9)
  • Headers – Sensor/IoT header, NFC/UIM header
  • Expansion Slot – mini-PCIe slot
  • Misc – 3x user buttons, 3x user LEDS and power indicator
  • Power – 12V power supply with external battery connector; optional PMIC with battery support
  • Dimensions – 170×170 mm (Mini-ITX form-factor)
OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

OPEN-Q 8084 Block Diagram

The company will provide an Android 4.4 BSP, but “embedded Linux customization” is also available. The full development kit includes Open-Q 805 8084) SoM in MXM 3.0 custom form factor, the Mini-ITX Carrier board for IO and expansion, a power supply, an HDMI cable, a Quick Start Guide, a licence agreement, and access to documentation and platform BSP. Cameras, LCD touchscreen displays, and extra sensors are available as options.

Intrinsyc’s OPEN-Q 8084 module is selling for $219, whereas the development kit goes for $449, with shipments scheduled for October. You may want to visit  Open-Q 8084 SOM and Open-Q 8084 Development Kit product pages for further details.

Via LinuxGizmos

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 ARM Cortex A5 Linux Development Board Comes with Dual Ethernet, HDMI Output

September 10th, 2014 1 comment

A few months ago, I reviewed Atmel Xplained SAMA5D3 development board powered by SAMA5D36 Cortex A5 processor. The kit is supported by the Yocto Project, so I could build and run Poky distribution with a recent Linux kernel (it support mainline), it features Arduino compatible headers, and I found the board to be a nice platform for headless applications, or applications that require an LCD display. However, if you wanted to connect an HDMI display you’d be out of luck, unless you design your own LCD to HDMI add-on board. Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 could be an interesting alternative, as it features very similar specifications, but adds an HDMI output port.

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

SBC-SAMA5D36 Development Board (Click to Enlarge)

Emtrion SBC-SAMA5D36 specifications:

  • MPU – Atmel SAMA5D36 single core Cortex-A5 @  536 MHz
  • System Memory – 256 MB RAM
  • Storage – 512 MB NAND Flash, up to 16 MB NOR Flash, and micro SD Card socket
  • Connectivity – 100Base-TX Ethernet,  10/100/1000Base-TX Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet)
  • Video Output – HDMI, LCD connector and 4-wire touch
  • USB -  2xUSB Host,  1x USB Device
  • Other I/Os:
    • I2S Audio Interface
    • 5x serial ports (LVTTL)
    • up to 52 GPIOs
    • 2x CAN buses
  • Misc – 2x user buttons, 4x user LEDs, RTC (battery buffered)
  • Power Supply – 5V.
  • Power Consumption -  Typ. 1 W
  • Dimensions – 135mm x 74mm
Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The board is said to support Debian 8.0 (Jessie), as well as build frameworks such as the Yocto Project and Buildroot. Just like Atmel SAMA5D3 Xplained, SBC-SAMA5D36 is supported in Linux mainline, except the LCD driver which is work in progress. The SDK includes a pre-configured rootFS based on Debian 8, Qt 5.2 support, GNU toolchain, build scripts, a VMware virtual machine for development and various software and hardware documents.

The board is available now for around 100 Euros for a single unit, and around 80 Euros for 1k order. You can find more information, including the hardware manual, on the company’s blog, and SBC-SAMA5D36 product page.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

$50 Intel Edison Board for Wearables Features an SoC with a Dual Core Atom Processor, and a Quark MCU

September 10th, 2014 7 comments

Intel announced the Edison board for wearables applications last January at CES 2014. When it first came out, it looked like an SD card, but the board look has now drastically changed. Nevertheless, the important point is that Intel Edison is now available, together with various development kits, and runs Linux (Yocto built), as well as an RTOS.

Intel_Edison_ModuleWith the official release, we’ve also got the full specifications:

  • SoC – Dual-core, dual-threaded Intel Atom (Silvermont) processor (22nm) processor @ 500 MHz and a 32-bit Intel Quark micro-controller @ 100 MHz. Includes 1GB LPDDR3 PoP memory
  • System Memory – 1 GB LPDDR3 (PoP memory) – 2 channel 32bits @ 800MT/sec
  • Storage – 4 GB eMMC (v4.51 spec) + micro SD card connector
  • Connectivity -  Dual band 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (Broadcom 43340) with either an on-board antenna or external antenna, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x micro USB connector
  • I/Os:
    • 2x UART  (1 full flow control, 1 Rx/Tx)
    • 2x I2C, 1x SPI with 2 chip selects
    • 1x I2S
    • 12x GPIO including 4 capable of PWM output
  • Module connector – 70-pin connector (Hirose DF40 series – 1.5, 2.0, or 3.0 mm stack height)
  • Power Supply – Input: 3.3 to 4.5 V; Output: 100mA @ 3.3V and 100 mA @ 1.8V
  • Power consumption – Standby (No radio): 13 mW;  Standby (Bluetooth 4.0): 21.5 mW (BLE in Q4 2014);  Standby (Wi-Fi): 35 mW.
  • Dimensions – 35.5 × 25.0 × 3.9 mm
  • Temperature Range – 0 to 40°C

The company will provide Yocto 1.6 Linux for the two cores of the Atom processor, and the Quark MCU will run an unnamed RTOS. Development tools for the Atom cores includes the Arduino IDE, Eclipse with support for C, C++ and Python programming languages, and Intel XDK for Node.JS and HTML5 development. An SDK and IDE will be available for the Quark MCU. Intel IoT Analytics Platform is the cloud solution adopted for the board, and will be free for limited and non-commercial use.

Intel Edison Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Intel Edison Board for Arduino (Click to Enlarge)

Edison is basically a module, so it might be useful to have a baseboard, and Intel has come up with two:

  • Intel Edison Board for Arduino – Board with Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and headers compatible with Arduino UNO expect it only supports 4 PWM instead of 6.
  • Intel Edison Breakout Board – Minimal board with the following key features:
    • Exposes native 1.8 V I/O of the Edison module.
    • 0.1″ grid I/O array of through-hole solder points.
    • USB OTG with USB Micro Type-AB connector
    • USB OTG power switch.
    • Battery charger.
    • USB to device UART bridge with USB micro Type-B connector.
    • DC power supply jack (7 to 15 VDC input).

Documentation including a product brief, hardware guides for Edison board for Arduino and the Breakout board, the Arduino IDE, and the instructions to get the Yocto BSP can be downloaded on Intel’s Edison Board page.

Intel Edison is available for backorder on Sparkfun for $49.95, and Edison for Arduino and Edison Breakout Board kits are listed Maker Shed for respectively $107 and $75, but currently out of stock. There’s also a Starter Pack on Sparkun for $114.95. Shipping is expected in 6 to 8 weeks.

Thanks to David and Freire.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Freescale To Give Away StarterTRAK Development Boards for Automotive Applications

September 5th, 2014 No comments

Freescale StarterTRAK development boards are based on the company’s Kinetis EA Cortex M0+ MUCs or Qorivva 32-bit MCU targeting automotive applications with support a wide temperature range (–40° to +125°C) and interfaces such as LIN (Local Interconnect Network) and CAN. These development boards can be used for body and security, powertrain, and safety & chassis applications. Freescale has decided to giveaway 60 StarterTRACK development board to random winners, so if you are knowledgeable in this field it could be an opportunity to try the platform. There will be 5 different kits given away, all based on Kinetis MCU: TRK‐KEA8, TRK‐KEA64, TRK‐KEA128, KEA128LEDLIGHTRD and KEA128BLDCRD. Let’s have a closer look at TRK-KEA128 development board.

TRK-KEA Boards Description (SCI port not available on TRK-KEA128)

TRK-KEA Boards Description (SCI Selector is not available on TRK-KEA128)

Key features and specifications of  TRK-KEA128 board:

  • MCU – Kinetis KEA128 ARM Cortex M0+ MCU @ 48MHz with 16KB RAM and 128KB flash in a 80 LQFP package
  • On-board openSDA debugging and programming circuit using the PK20DX128 MCU
  • LIN communications interface
  • Analog interface with ambient light sensor
  • 4 high efficiency LEDs
  • 2 push buttons
  • SCI serial communication interface (sharing the openSDA interface)
  • CAN communications interface
Kinetis EA MCU Block Diagram

Kinetis EA MCU Block Diagram

The development kit includes a TRK-KEA128 board, a DVD with CodeWarrior software, a USB cable, TRK-KEA Quick Start Guide, and Freescale Warranty Card. Schematics, BoM, as applications notes are also provided by the company. Automotive application possible with this board include HVAC, doors, window lift and seat control, parking breaks, tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS), and more. They can also be used to control brushless DC motors. Full details can be found on TRK-KEA128 page.

If you’d like the board you can either spend $49, or try your luck for with giveaway. The constest is open to individuals who are at least 18 years old and resident in a non‐U.S.‐embargoed country, expect residents of Canada. To enter, simply fill that form with your name, email, and country of residence. That’s all, no question about your potential project is even asked. The draw will take place on September 24, 2014.

Thanks to Nanik!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

MinnowBoard MAX Schematics, Board layout, Gerber, and BoM Released

August 30th, 2014 2 comments

MinnowBoard MAX (aka MinnowBoard2) is an embedded board powered by Intel Atom Bay-Trail-I E3815 (single core) or E3825 (dual core) processor, with 1 to 2GB RAM, SATA II, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet ports, and more. The board currently officially supports four operating systems: Debian GNU/Linux, Linux built with the Yocto Project, Android 4.4, and Windows 8.1. One of its main selling point is the price as the single core version sells for $99, and the dual core version for $129, rivalling in price with equivalent ARM based development boards. It’s also an open source hardware board, and as it’s now about to ship, CircuitCo released all hardware files under a Creative Commons CC-BY-SA license, allowing anybody with the right skills to create a clone, or their own hardware.

MinnowBoard MAX Block Diagram as Shown in Schematics

MinnowBoard MAX Block Diagram as Shown in Schematics

Here are the files that have been released:

Schematics and PCB layout have been designed with Cadence Orcad and Allegro, so you’d need these tools to modify them. You can also open the Allegro files with Cadence Allegro FREE Viewer (Windows only).
All these files, and other documentation, can be found on MinnowBoard MAX page on eLinux.org. Single and dual core versions of the board can be pre-ordered on Mouser, Tigal (Europe), or Techno Disti. MinnowBoard MAX DUAL should ship shortly (Early September), and the single core board a little later.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

A80 OptimusBoard Development Board Pictures and Benchmarks

August 29th, 2014 13 comments

A80 OptimusBoard is a development board featuring the latest AllWinner A80 SoC with 8 ARM Cortex A15/A7 cores in big.LITTLE configuration, and a PowerVR GC6230 GPU. Availability was announced about 2 weeks ago for $345, but partially thanks to reader comments on CNX Software, Merrii Technology decided to lower the price to $169 (and $50+ for shipping) to stay competitive against similar boards such as Hardkernel ODROID-XU3. I’ve now received a sample for evaluation. I won’t go again through the specs, but today I’ll take a few pictures of the board, and provide benchmark results to compare them to the ones I got with Rockchip RK3288. Normally, I would also play with the SDK provided with the board, but sadly (and amazingly), there’s currently no such SDK for A80 OptimusBoard, except a leaked Linux SDK which failed to build with recent tools and operating systems.

A80 OptimusBoard Pictures

I’ve received the board via DHL from WITS Technology in the following package.

A80_OPtimusBoard_PackageInside the package, we’ve got the board itself in a transparent acrylic “enclosure”, a 5V/3A power supply, and a USB to serial cable.

A80 OptimusBoard with Power Supply and Debug Cable (Click to Enlarge)

A80 OptimusBoard with Power Supply and Debug Cable (Click to Enlarge)

I’ve also taken several pictures of the board. The top view shows AllWinner A80 SoC with 4 SKHynix chips for 2GB RAM, an AP6330 Wi-Fi module, and AXP809 PMIC, as well as various header for camera, serial, GPIOs (32 pins), battery, and JTAG. There’s also an IR receiver, and two small buttons for reset and power\ on this side of the board.

Top of A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

Top of A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

One thing that surprised me is that they did not include a heatsink with the board. Normally these kind of board comes with heatsinks and even maybe a fan small to let developers push the performance.

On the back of the board, there’s mostly the 16 GB Samsung eMMC flash, and a micro SD slot.

Bottom of A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

Connectors include a USB 3.0 OTG port, HDMI output, two USB 2.0 host ports, the DC jack, an Ethernet port (RJ45), and a 3.5mm headphone jack.

Connectors (Click to Enlarge)

Connectors (Click to Enlarge)

A80 OptimusBoard Benchmarks

I’ve connected an HDMI cable between the board and my TV, my air mouse RF dongle, an Ethernet cable, and the power supply to start the board. Boot time takes about 25 seconds.

Click for Original Size

Click for Original Size

I’ve been told the benchmarks may not be as high as for AllWinner A80 tablets. But let’s try anyway. Luckily, Google Play is installed with the firmware, but although I can login and search for apps, clicking on install did nothing. No problem, as I can install them by selecting “No Carrier AllWinner UltraOcta A80 OptimusBoard” on Google Play website.

But before running benchmarks, let’s get some details about AllWinner A80 SoC and the board with CPU-Z.

CPU-Z For AllWinner A80 (Click to Enlarge)

CPU-Z For AllWinner A80 (Click to Enlarge)

Since only some Cortex A7 cores (between 480 MHz and 1.20 GHz), CPU-Z appears to ignore Cortex A15 cores, and wrongly reports eight Cortex A7 cores. The codename of the board is “kylin_optimus”, which may be something useful to know when looking for information. It’s running Android 4.4.2 on top of Linux kernel 3.4.39, and everything have been built in early July. Resolution is 1920×1016, only 1205MB RAM is reported, most probably because some is reserved for the GPU, and some other hardware buffers. There’s 12.82 GB of internal storage.

The first benchmark I ran is Antutu 5, which they released yesterday.

Antutu 5 on A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

Antutu 5 on A80 OptimusBoard (Click to Enlarge)

It gets 33,921 which seems a little low, considering Amlogic S802 (Probox2 EX) got 37,000 with Antutu 5 (Beta), but as mentioned above they have not optimized the current firmware and hardware for performance. I haven’t run Antutu 5 on Rockchip RK3288 devices yet, so I can’t do a direct comparison yet. The firmware is also dated July 3,2014, so some more optimization may have been performed on the firmware since then. Yet no new firmware has been released.

Next… Quadrant benchmark could not run at all, and all I got was a black screen, just like with UyeSee G1H TV Box.

Vellamo worked, but I had to try twice to complete the benchmark.

A80_OptimusBoard_VellamoThe browser score is better on AllWinner A80 (2,308) than with Rockchip RK3288 (2,147), but A80 firmware defaulted to the Chrome browser, whereas UyeSee G1H used the stock Android Browser for this test, so both results can’t be compared. The Metal scores are somewhat similar with 1,287 (A80) and 1,323 (RK3288). Surprisingly, the Multicore (beta) test us much better on the quad core RK3288 (1,972) compared to the eight core A80 (1,340).

A80 Optimus Board Vellamo Multicore Comparison (Click to Enlarge)

A80 OptimusBoard Vellamo Multicore Comparison (Click to Enlarge)

During the tests, I also connected the serial console. Here’s what I got during the multicore test:

[   86.078970] CPU4: shutdown
 [   90.610468] CPU1: Booted secondary processor
 [   91.092528] CPU2: Booted secondary processor
 [   91.592556] CPU3: Booted secondary processor
 [   92.119633] CPU4: Booted secondary processor
 [   94.104631] CPU5: Booted secondary processor
 [   95.105115] CPU6: Booted secondary processor
 [   97.106251] CPU7: Booted secondary processor
 [   98.767201] CPU Budget: Limit state:1 item[1200000,4,1608000,4 0]
 [   98.774392] CPU Budget:update CPU 4 cpufreq max to 1608000 min to 600000
 [  100.591363] CPU7: shutdown
 [  100.917218] CPU Budget: Limit state:0 item[1200000,4,1800000,4 0]
 [  101.106648] CPU6: shutdown
 [  101.578869] CPU5: shutdown
 [  102.069103] CPU3: shutdown
 [  102.578981] CPU2: shutdown
 [  103.594914] CPU5: Booted secondary processor
 [  105.099015] CPU6: Booted secondary processor
 [  107.092366] CPU2: Booted secondary processor

AllWinner A80 cores are booted in sequences. The Cortex A7 cores with 500ms interval, and the first two Cortex A15 are started first in 1 second intervals, and then 2 seconds interval. These delays may explain the lower performance of AllWinner A80 compared to Rockchip RK3288, and are probably done to optimize power consumption, rather than performance. You’ll also notice that when all 8 cores are running the Cortex A15 frequency is limited to 1.6 GHz, and after CPU7 is shutdown, it is re-adjusted to 1.8 GHz. Checking “/sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu1/cpufreq/scaling_governor” show it’s set to “interactive”. so it would probably be possible to get a higher performance, with the CPU governor set to “performance”. I’m not sure how to change the behaviour since “cpupower” does not seem to be available (by default) in Android, and “cpufreq” directory is not available with shutdown cores. Maybe I should study about this, and write my finding in a separate post. Tips are welcome.

I’ve also noticed that running “cat /proc/cpuinfo” will only show the cores that are not shutdown, so during idle time you may just see one core.

AllWinner A80 embeds an Imagination Technologies PowerVR GC6230, which is supposed to provide some decent performance. So I’ve also run “Ice Storm Extreme” tests part of Futuremark’s 3Dmark benchmark.

3DMarks Ice Storm Extreme on A80 Optimus Board (Click to Enlarge)

3DMarks Ice Storm Extreme on A80 Optimus Board (Click to Enlarge)

But yet again, the results are somewhat disappointing, as A80 OptimusBoard got 5,841 points against 7,278 points for Rockchip RK3288, but the main culprits are the Physics score and test which for some reasons are much lower on AllWinner A80. The other scores are similar to Rockchip RK3288.

Finally some Linux benchmarks results. There’s still no Linux distribution available for A80 Optimius Board, but Linuxium ran some tests from the Phoronix test suite in a Linux chroot in Android comparing it to ODROID-U3 (Samsung Exynos 4412), MINIX NEO X8 (Amlogic S802), and Radxa Rock (Rockchip RK3188). These are all ARM Cortex A9 quad core processor, and the AllWinner A80 development board easily outperform these in most test.

A80_Optimus_vs_ODROID-U3_vs_MINIX_NEO_X8_vs_Radxa_Rock_LinuxAll these benchmark results should be taken with grain of salt, as the firmware is rather old, and I’d expect some performance improvement with newer firmware, and CPU governor set to performance.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter