Archive

Posts Tagged ‘esp32’

$6.90 Wemos LoLin32 ESP32 Development Board Comes with 4MB Flash, Lithium Battery Support

April 21st, 2017 3 comments

Wemos – the company behind the cool Wemos D1 mini ESP8266 board – has now launched its first Espressif ESP32 development board with LoLin32 equipped with ESP-WROOM-32 module with 4MB flash, a micro USB port, and a battery header.

Click to Enlarge

Wemos Lolin32 specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP-WROOM-32 based on Espressif ESP-32 dual core processor @ 240 MHz with 4MB flash
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth LE
  • I/Os
    • 26x digital I/Os
    • 12x analog inputs
    • UART, I2C, SPI, VP/VN, DAC
    • 3.3V I/O voltage
    • Breadboard compatible
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming/debugging
  • Power – 5V via micro USB + battery header for Lithium battery (charging current: 500mA max)
  • Dimensions – 5.8 x 2.54 cm
  • Weight – 5.8 grams

Click to Enlarge

The board is not compatible with Wemos D1 mini (34.2 x 25.6 mm) and shield, but offers a more powerful solution with Bluetooth LE, battery support, and more I/Os. The Wiki is still work-in-progres, and there’s no that much information on the page yet.

Wemos LoLin32 can be purchased for $6.90 + shipping ($8.66 in my case) on Aliexpress.

Via ESP32net twitter

Hornbill ESP32 Development Boards Come with an Optional IP67 Rated Enclosure (Crowdfunding)

April 7th, 2017 1 comment

While there are plenty of ESP32 development boards, and prices have recently plummeted, getting a case for your project can still be a problem especially if you plan to use it outdoor, as you need to protect your hardware from rain and dust. Hornbill project offers two ESP-WROOM-32 based boards, a prototype board, and an IP67 certified case that could be useful for outdoor use.

Hornbill ESP32 Development Boards

Let’s start by checking the boards available starting with ” Hornbill ESP32 Dev” board with the following specs:

  • ESP-WROOM-32 module with WiFi, Bluetooth LE,  FCC, CE, IC, MIC (Telec), KCC, and NCC certifications
  • I/O headers
    • 2x 19-pin headers with GPIOs, I2C, UART, SPI, ADC, DAC, touch interface, VN/VP, 5V, 3.3V and GND
    • Breadboard-friendly
  • Debug – Built-in CP21XX USB-to-serial
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port, battery header + single cell LiPo charger
  • Dimensions – TBD

ESP32 Dev (left) and ESP32 Minima (right)

ESP32 Minima is also based on ESP-WROOM-ESP32 module, but is designed for wearables with its round PCB, it only includes a header for battery power, and is limited to 16 large pads with through holes for I/Os, as well as 6 pins for programming and debugging the board.

Hornbill ESP32 Dev Pinout Diagram – Click to Enlarge

Finally, the company has also designed Hornbill ESP32 Proto board where you can solder ESP32 Dev board, and add whatever components you may need for your project. The Proto board also includes a microSD card slot, an RGB LED, an SHT 31 humidity and temperature sensor, as well as footprints for 6x IR transmitters and 1x IR Receiver.

Hornbill Weather Proof Case and Kits

Beside the boards, the developers also provide an IP67 case for it, as well as kits leveraging the case:

  • Hornbill OUR (Open Remote Control) – Bluetooth (BLE) to Infrared (IR) bridge to control IR devices with your smartphone
  • Hornbill Lights – Control RGB LED strips over Bluetooth Smart
  • Hornbill IDL (Industrial Data Logger) – Logs power and temperature values, and upload them securely to the cloud.

There’s also Hornbill Makers Kit without the case, but with Hornbill ESP32 Dev and plenty of modules to play with, such as relays, various sensors, LEDs, a buzzer, an OLED display, a mini breadboard and so on… You’ll find ESP32 firmware and Android app source code for all kits on ExploreEmbedded github account.

 

Hornbill project has just launched on CrowdSupply with the goal of raising at least $2,000. A $12 pledge is asked for Hornbill ESP32 Dev or Hornbill Minima, $15 for the case, and the kits go from $39 (Hornbill ESP32 Dev + Proto board + Case) to $79 for Hornbill Lights with a WS2812 LED strip. Worldwide shipping is included in the price, and delivery is scheduled for June 2017. Noe that this is not the first project from ExploreEmbedded, as they previously launched Explorer M3 board based on NXP LPC microcontroller. However, since CrowdSupply do not show backers’ comments, I could not check whether backers are happy, or the project shipped on time.

New Espressif ESP32 Single and Dual Core Processors in 5x5mm Package, Optional Embedded Flash Coming Soon

April 4th, 2017 7 comments

Espressif ESP32 was launched last year as a dual core Tensila processor with WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity, relying on external flash for storage, and packaged into a QFN48 6x6mm package. Espressif recently updated ESP32 datasheet, and the guys at ESP32net noticed three new versions of the processor with a QFN48 5x5mm package, one version including 2 MBytes embedded flash, and another version with a single core.

The three new versions of ESP32 all come with the same WiFi 802.11b/g/n ad Bluetooth 4.0 LE connectivity and a QFN 5×5:

  • ESP32-D0WD dual core processor without embedded flash
  • ESP32-D2WD dual core processor with 16 Mbit embedded flash
  • ESP32-S0WD single core processor without embedded flash

ESP32-D0WD different with ESP32-D0WDQ6 is only the smaller package, while ESP32-D2WD brings 2MB embedded flash too possibly lowering the price of current solution with external flash, and ESP32-S0WD might be closer to ESP8266 price thanks to its single core, while still offering Bluetooth Smart support on top of WiFi.

Other interesting – but so far unused – parts of the nomenclature are that future ESP32 version may support 802.11a (AFAIK no that commonly used), as well as 802.11ac for higher WiFi throughput, which would also mean a dual band (2.4 / 5GHz) ESP32 processor (ESP32-D0CD or ESP32-D2CD) might be manufactured in the future.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip.

Categories: Espressif Tags: 802.11ac, ble, esp32, espressif, IoT, wifi

Is NodeMCU ESP-32S Board Now Selling for $8.50 Shipped?

March 31st, 2017 8 comments

ESP32 SoC with WiFi and Bluetooth launched last September for around $3, followed soon after by ESP32 modules for $7, and a few weeks later, easier to use ESP32 development boards were introduced, but sold for around $20 likely due a mismatch between supply and demand. That’s not overly expensive, but in a world of $4 ESP8266 boards and $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W with Linux, WiFi and Bluetooth, it may feel that way. But today, I noticed DealExtreme sold GeekWorm ESP32 board with ESP-WROOM-32 module for just $11.64 shipped. That’s good progress, but surely Aliexpress must now have cheaper options, and sure enough, I could find NodeMCU ESP-32S board (now confirmed NOT to be an official NodeMCU devkit) sold for $6.95 + shipping, which brought the price up to about $8.50.

NodeMCU ESP-32S specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP-WROOM-32 with Espressig ESP32 dual core processor with 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • Expansion – 2x 19 pin headers with GPIOs, Analog inputs (ADC), UART, I2C, VP/VN, etc…; breadboard compatible
  • USB – 1x micro USB port for power and programming
  • Misc – BOOT and EN buttons, red (power) and blue (GPIO2) LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V via USB or Vin pin
  • Dimensions – 51.4 x 28.3 mm

The Aliexpress page directs to LuaNode github page, which explains how to build and flash the firmware (provided you want to use Lua) and use the board. The information does to refers to NodeMCU, but DOIT ESP32 development board instead sold on Aliexpress for just under $10 shipped. Both boards look exactly the same apart from marking, and you’ll find the schematics here. There are also some examples on the Wiki on github with an ESP32 camera, and Nokia5110 LCD screen.

As I was about to complete this post, I heard the postman motorbike’s horn, and it turns out I’ve just received my first ESP32 board from IC station today, which to my surprise did not come fully assembled, so I’ll have to solder eboxmaker ESP32-Bit module on the board. The price has increased since last time I checked, with the board now sold for $19.99, with some 15% discount possible using jeanics coupon.

Secure IoT Connectivity with NodeMCU ESP8266 Board, ATECC508A Crypto Chip, Mongoose OS, and AWS IoT

March 7th, 2017 16 comments

There are many examples of Internet of Things projects, but more often than not the implementation is not secure, either because the device is exposed to the Internet with minimum or no security (worst case), or a gateway (hopefully) provides secure connection to the Internet, but the communication between sensor nodes and the gateway in the local network is not secure, due to memory limitation of the nodes, for example it might be challenging to implement security on ESP8266. Mongoose OS is an open source operating system for the Internet of Things developed by Cesanta working on ESP32, ESP8266, STM32, and TI CC3200, and the developers have demonstrated a secure solution with Mongoose OS running on ESP8266 connecting over a TLS connection to AWS IoT (Amazon Web Service IoT) and using TLS credentials stored in Microchip ATECC508A CryptoAuthentication Device.

NodeMCU with ATCRYPTOAUTH-XPRO (Left) or barebone ATECC508A (Right)

The addition of ATECC508 chip either using “XplainedPro extension board for crypto products” (ATCRYPTOAUTH-XPRO) or ATECC508A chip itself, is to avoid storing private TLS credentials in NodeMCU’s flash memory, as anybody with physical access to the device could steal private keys and get access to the cloud. ATECC508A is connected via the I2C interface of the target board.

So I guess the crypto chip truly makes sense if you have sensor nodes on the field with information important enough that third parties may be interested in getting access to your sensor to try read your private key from ESP8266’s flash. It costs less than $1, so you may consider it anyway, although you can still get a secure TLS connection between NodeMCU and AWS IoT without it, but it adds another level of security.

Once you are done with the hardware connections, you’ll need to install Mongoose OS on the board, and follow the MQTT + AWS IoT tutorial to get started. Nothing complicated need to be done to leverage the crypto chip, as the command mgos aws-iot-setup should automatically detect ATECC508A chip and use it.

22€ Olimex ESP32-EVB ESP32 Development Board Features an Ethernet Port and Relays

February 10th, 2017 3 comments

We already have a good choice of ESP32 development boards, but none of the ones I’ve seen make use of the Ethernet MAC interface found in Espressif ESP32 SoC. Olimex has changed that with their ESP32-EVB featuring ESP32-WROOM32 module as well as one Fast Ethernet port and two relays.

Olimex ESP32-EVB specifications:

  • Wireless Module – ESP32-WROOM32 module with 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth LE
  • Wired Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet RJ45 port
  • External Storage – micro SD slot
  • Relays – 2x 10A/250VAC relays
  • Expansion
    • 40-pin GPIO female header (2.54mm pitch)
    • UEXT connector for sensors and modules
  • Misc – 2x user buttons
  • Power Supply
    • 5V power jack
    • LiPo charger and step up converter allowing ESP32-EVB to run from LiPo battery

The company still have to write software samples, and do some testing to make sure the board work before going into mass production. Once everything is cleared, the board will be sold for 22 Euros.

Oh Look… Espressif ESP32 Die-shot! That’s Pretty!

February 6th, 2017 13 comments

Espressif ESP32 was launched last year as a faster and upgraded version of ESP8266, with a dual core processor, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 LE. Boards based on the processor are still priced much higher than the ones based on ESP8266 ( although we’re only talking about $20 here), and shops have trouble keeping stocks, so either there’s a huge demand, there’s some manufacturing bottleneck, or maybe Espressif wants to take it slow at the beginning in case some hard to find bugs are found in the Silicon. Nevertheless, the guys at Zeptobar got hold of some ESP32 modules, and took some pretty die-shots.

Click to Enlarge

The die size is 2960×2850 µm. The prettiest part is clearly the RF section zoomed in below.

Click to Enlarge

If you wonder how it compares to ESP8266 die-shot, Zeptobar has you covered.

Categories: Espressif, Hardware Tags: esp32, espressif

ESP32-WROVER-KIT Devkit Supports Espressif ESP32 Modules, Includes a 3.2″ LCD Display

December 30th, 2016 5 comments

Yesterday Olimex wrote a blog post informing us that ESP32-CoreBoard was back in stock, one the many ESP32 boards launched late this year, but still hard to get. The company also mentioned they’d have limited quantity of the new ESP32-WROVER with JTAG and LCD display together with the picture below.

esp32-wrover-esp32-lcd-kit

ESP32 is quite more powerful than ESP8266 so it makes sense to have an ESP32 development kit with an LCD display. A quick DuckDuckGo search led me to ESP-WROVER-KIT Getting Started Guide, where we can find more details including the overall specifications:

  • Compatible with ESP-WROOM-32 and ESP32-WROVER modules based on ESP32 dual core Tensilica L108 processor clocked at up to 240 MHz with WiFi and Bluetooth LE connectivity
  • Storage – Micro SD slot
  • Display – 3.2″ LCD display connected via SPI
  • USB – 1x micro USB port
  • Expansion
    • 8-pin UART header
    • 6-pin SPI header
    • 48-pin header for I/Os and camera interface (standard OV7670 camera module supported)
  • Debugging – JTAG through USB interface (FTDI FT2232HL) or 14-pin header
  • Misc – CTS/RTS jumper; power selection (EXT or USB); RGB LED; boot & reset (EN) buttons
  • Power Supply – 5V DC input; 5V to 3.3V LDO chip
  • Dimensions – 85.2 x 79.0 mm
ESP-WROVER-KIT Block Diagram - Click to Enlarge

ESP-WROVER-KIT Block Diagram – Click to Enlarge

The rest of the getting started guide explains how to configure jumpers to set the power source, serial flow control, and JTAG. It also shows how to access the serial console with a typical 115200 8N1 connection, as well as compile and load a simple hello program with ESP-IDF SDK in Windows and Linux.

Image Source: HackerBoads

Image Source: HackerBoards

Beside the development kit itself, I also discovered the new ESP32-WROVER module with the same feature as ESP-WROOM-32 plus an extra 32Mbit pSRAM chip and an external antenna connector.

esp32-wrover

ESP32-WROVER Photo via ESP32 Twitter Account

The kit should be available in January based on Olimex’ blog post, but we don’t have any pricing info yet.