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Posts Tagged ‘uefi’

Linaro 14.10 Release with Kernel 3.17 and Android 4.4.4, Debian ARM64 Port Almost Complete

October 31st, 2014 No comments

Linaro 14.10 has just been released with Linux kernel 3.17 (baseline), Linux 3.10.54 & 3.14.19 (LSK, same versions as last month), and Android 4.4.2 & 4.4.4.

Most of the work is a continuation of previous months working member hardware, and ARM64, but one particularly interesting point is that 90% of Debian packages have been built for ARM64, and the next version of Debian should have an official ARM64 port.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.17-2014.10
    • updated linaro-android topic. In particular, CONFIG_IPV6=y is no longer the requirement for linux-linaro tree builds
    • GATOR version 5.19 (same version as in 2014.08 release). gatord is fixed to build for ARMv8.
    • dropped multi_pmu_v2 topic by ARM LT (no longer used)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (include IFC6410 board support)
    • replaced integration-linaro-vexpress topic by integration-linaro-vexpress64. Starting from 2014.10 release, linux-linaro kernel tree will use the mainline support for 32-bit vexpress boards. integration-linaro-vexpress64 carried over FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support from the integration-linaro-vexpress.
    • updated LLVM topic (uses llvmlinux-2014.10.01 branch – the most recent v3.17-based version of llvmlinux-latest)
    • dropped ARMv7 big endian topic(obsoleted; most of the patches are upstream)
    • added ILP32 patch set v3 with one minor build fix. (ILP32 vs LP64 data models)
    • config fragments changes – distribution.conf: CONFIG_IPV6=y replaced with CONFIG_IPV6=m
  • Linux Linaro LSK 2014.10:
    • The v3.14 based LSK based on kernel.org 3.14.19 stable tree
    • Updates to:
      • kernel.org 3.10.55 stable tree
      • Android support (from Google and Linaro)
      • ARMv8 fixes and performance enhancements
      • UEFI support
      • Mailbox framework
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.10
    • based on GCC 4.9 and updated to latest Linaro TCWG releases (Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10)
    • first release built with cbuild2, adding more maintainable code base and automatic testing
    • binary tarballs have been splitted into 3 parts. As a result, you can install only the parts needed:
      • gcc-linaro-*.tar.xz – the compiler and tools
      • runtime-linaro-*.tar.xz – runtime libraries needed on the target
      • sysroot-linaro-*.tar.xz – sysroot (a set of libraries and headers to develop against)
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 14.10
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10
    • AOSP master build for Juno is cleaned up. It now builds without any patches on AOSP projects. It builds by adding 9 projects to AOSP manifest related to device, kernel, toolchain and helper tools.
    • LSK Android testing issues are fixed for ARMv8 Fast Models
    • bc tool is added to ARMv8 Android Juno build
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.10
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2014.10
    • fixed shadow securetty for SBSA compatible UART
    • switched OpenJDK to upstream aarch64 hg repos
    • dropped mongodb from LAMP images
    • upstreaming:
      • updated acpica 20140828 release
      • updated acpitests 20140828 release
      • updated pm-qa to 0.4.14 release
      • added aarch64 support to libunwind
      • fixed PHP build warnings
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.10 – Updated packages: Juno firmware 0.8.2, LSK 3.10.58/3.14.22 and linux-linaro 3.17 kernels, xf86-video-freedreno 1.3.0
  • Debian arm64 support is going very well. More than 90% of the packages are built. The effort is on track to get next Debian release with an officially supported arm64 architecture.
  • KVM CI loop on Juno is completed. The remaining work is happening on Xen CI loop.

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1410/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Linux 3.16 Released

August 6th, 2014 3 comments

Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux Kernel 3.16 over the week-end:

So nothing particularly exciting happened this week, and 3.16 is out there.

And as usual (previous release being the exception) that means that the merge window for 3.17 is obviously open. And for the third time in a row, the timing sucks for me, as I have travel coming up the second week of the merge window. Many other core developers will be traveling too, since it’s just before the kernel summit in Chicago.

So we’ll see how the next merge window goes, but I’m not going to worry about it overmuch. If I end up not having time to do all the merges, I might delay things into the week of the kernel summit, but I’ll hope to get most of the big merging done this upcoming week before any travel takes place, so maybe it won’t come to that. So this is just a heads-up that the merge window *might* be extended.

Anyway, back to the changes since -rc7: it’s really fairly small stuff randomly all over, with a third being architecture updates, a third drivers, and a third “misc” (mainly mm and networking). The architecture stuff is small ARM updates (mostly DT), some x86 Xen fixups, some random small powerpc things. The shortlog gives a good idea of what kind of stuff it all is, but it’s really just 83 commits (plus merges and the release commit) and about a third of them are marked for stable.

So while 3.16 looked a bit iffy for a while, things cleared up nicely, and there was no reason to do extra release candidates like I feared just a couple of weeks ago.

Linus

Kernel 3.15 brought various file systems improvements, faster resume from suspend, etc… Some of Linux 3.16 main changes include:

  • Various KVM improvements: optimizations, support for migration, and GDB support for s390, little-endian support for POWER8, as well as MIPS improvements.
  • Xen – Virtual network interfaces now have multi-queue support for much better performance.
  • Goldfish virtual platform now has 64-bit support.
  • Hugepage migration has been turned off for all architectures except x86_64 since it is only tested on that architecture and there are bugs for some of the others.
  • Automatic NUMA balancing has been turned off for 32-bit x86. Existing 32-bit NUMA systems are not well supported by the code and the developers did not think the effort to support them would be worthwhile.
  • EFI – The kernel EFI code will now handle Unicode characters, and initial support for ARM64 (aarch64) had been added.
  • NFS – Patches to make loopback NFS mounts work reliably have been merged through the NFS tree.  External data representation (XDR) handling in NFS has been reworked to support access control lists (ACLs) larger than 4KB. It also returns readdir() results in chunks larger than 4KB giving better performance on large directories.
  • Modules now have the read-only (RO) and no-execute (NX) bits set on their data sections much earlier in the loading process, before parsing any module arguments. This will further reduce the time window in which a misbehaving (or malicious) module can modify or execute its data.
  • Support for TCP fast open over IPv6 has been added.
  • Support for busy polling on stream control transmission protocol (SCTP) sockets has been added. Busy polling is set on a socket using the SO_BUSY_POLL socket option; it can reduce the latency of receives on high-traffic interfaces that support the option.

New features and improvements specific to the ARM architecture include:

  • AllWinner – All platforms: AXP20x PMIC and MMC support, 5 drivers + SMP reworked for AllWinner A31, touchscreen drivers for AllWinner A10. DTS added for Mele M9 and R7. You can read details about AllWinner changes here.
  • Rockchip – RK3xxx SoC I2C drivers
  • Xen on ARM systems now supports suspend and resume.
  • Hibernation support added for ARM targets.
  • Initial support for ARM64 (aarch64) had been added
  • SMP support has been added for Marvell Armada 375 and 38x SoCs. SMP has been reworked for the Allwinner A31 SoC.
  • New ARM SoC added: ST Microelectronics STiH407; Freescale i.MX6SX; Samsung Exynos 3250, 5260, 5410, 5420, and 5800; and LSI Axxia AXM55xx.
  • Nouveau driver has initial support for NVIDIA Tegra K1 GK20A devices.
  • Various changes for Atmel AT91, Marvell Armada, Fresscale i.MX, Samsung Exynos, and TI AM43xx SoCs.

Further details on Linux 3.16 will eventually be available on Kernelnewbies.org. For more details about ARM changes, remember to also check ARM architecture and drivers sections.

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Linux 3.15 Released

June 11th, 2014 2 comments

Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux Kernel 3.15 last Sunday:

So I ended up doing an rc8 because I was a bit worried about some last-minute dcache fixes, but it turns out that nobody seemed to even notice those. We did have other issues during the week, though, so it was just as well. The futex fixes and cleanups may stand out, but as usual there’s various other random fixes since rc8 in there too: mainly drivers (drm, networking, sound, usb etc), networking, scheduling and perf tooling.

But it’s all been fairly small and quiet, which *may* of course be due to the fact that last week was also the first week of the merge window for 3.16. That might have distracted some developers. I’m not entirely convinced I liked the overlap, but it seemed to work ok, and unless people scream really loudly (“Please don’t _ever_ do that again”) and give good reasons for doing so, I might end up doing that overlapping merge window in the future too if it ends up helping out with some particular timing issue.

That said, I also don’t think it was such a wonderful experience that I’d want to necessarily do the overlap every time, without a good specific reason for doing so. It was kind of nice being productive during the last week or rc (which is usually quite boring and dead), but I think it might be a distraction when people should be worrying about the stability of the rc.

Of course, maybe the overlap ends up meaning that we get less noise during the last week of stabilization, and it actually helps. It could go either way. I’d be interested to hear what people thought, although I _suspect_ most people don’t feel strongly either way.

Anyway, with 3.15 released, my “master” branch has already merged the work in my “next” branch on my local machine, and I’ll be decommissioning the “next” branch once I push that all out. After that, any future merge window work will happen on “master”, and we’ll be back to the normal single-branch model for my tree.

Kernel 3.14 brought a file systems (btrfs) and networking improvements, zram was considered stable, etc. Linux 3.15 main changes include:

  • Faster resume from power suspend in systems with hard disks – Resuming a system from suspend used to take a long time in systems with traditional hard disks, because the system blocks the resume process until the hard disk finish powering up. In this release, commands are sent to the hard disk asynchronously, so the entire resuming process isn’t paused by the hard disk. The end result is that systems with hard disks will resume several seconds faster with this Linux release. For more details, read this blog post.
  • Improved working set size detection –  When there is not enough room for all memory in RAM, the Linux kernel is in charge of deciding which memory must be kept in RAM, and which must be sent to swap or discarded. In this release, Linux does more advanced tracking of how memory gets used and can balance better the size of the lists, which makes Linux perform better in certain workloads, adapt better to workload size changes, and creates a foundation to build improved policies in the future. Read LWN article Better active/inactive list balancing for details.
  • EFI 64 bit kernels can be booted from 32 bit firmware – Most modern x86 CPUs are 64bit, yet many systems ship with a 32 bit EFI implementation. This didn’t allow to boot a Linux 64 bit EFI kernel from these 32 bit EFI systems. This limitation has been removed, a 64-bit kernel can be booted on 32-bit firmware that runs on 64 bit CPUs.
  • New file locking scheme: file private locks – Due to some unfortunate history, POSIX locks have very strange and unhelpful semantics: they are dropped whenever the process closes any file descriptor associated with the inode, and locks taken between threads within the same process won’t conflict with one another, which renders them useless for synchronization between threads. This release adds a new type of lock that attempts to address these issues. These locks will conflict with classic POSIX read/write locks, but have semantics that are more like BSD locks with respect to inheritance and behavior on close.Read LWN article File-private POSIX locks to get more information.
  • Faster erasing and zeroing of parts of a file –  This release adds two new fallocate(2) mode flags: FALLOC_FL_COLLAPSE_RANGE which allows to remove a range of a file without leaving holes, improving the performance of these operations that previously needed to be done with workarounds, and  FALLOC_FL_ZERO_RANGE which allows to set a range of a file to zero, much faster than it would take to do it manually. Only XFS and Ext4 have added support for these new flags in this release, and other filesystems will follow in the future. You can read Finding the proper scope of a file collapse operation for details
  • File cross-renaming support – Cross-rename, a variant of rename which exchanges the two files, has been added. This allows use cases which were not possible before, for instance atomically replacing a directory tree with a symlink. It also allows overlayfs and friends to operate on whiteouts atomically. More information can be found in LWN article Exchanging two files.
  • zram: LZ4 compression support, improved performance – Zram memory compression mechanism added support for the LZ4 compression algorithm, which is better than the current available LZO in some cases, as well as come performance improvements to concurrent compression of multiple compression streams, and the ability to switch the compression algorithm in /sys/block/zram0/comp_algorithm.
  • Intel AVX-512 vector instructions support – AVX-512 are 512-bit extensions to the 256-bit Advanced Vector Extensions SIMD instructions for x86 instruction set architecture proposed by Intel, and scheduled to be supported in 2015 with Intel’s Knights Landing processor. Read the documentation on Intel website for more information about AVX-512.
  • FUSE: improved write performance – FUSE can now use cached writeback support to fuse, which improves write throughput.

Starting with Linux 3.15 release, I’ll also point out some of the improvements and new features brought to the ARM architecture:

  • AllWinner – It’s now possible to boot a usable headless Linux OS using the mainline kernel on AllWinner A1x/A2X. Support have been added to LinkSprite pcDuino, Inet 97f, and A10-OLinuXino-LIME. You can read details about AllWinner changes here.
  • Device tree support added for various OMAP, Atmel, Broadcom, Marvell, Texas Instruments Keystone & Sitara, and Freescale i.MX based hardware platforms
  • Various perf modifications for ARM64, Cortex A12, and Qualcomm krait.
  • Rockchip – Added SMP support
  • SATA driver added for Applied Micro X-Gene and Exynos 5250

Further details on Linux 3.15 are available on Kernelnewbies.org. For more details about ARM changes, you can read the ARM architecture and drivers sections.

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$99 MinnowBoard MAX Development Board Powered by Intel Bay Trail-I SoC

April 1st, 2014 11 comments

When Intel released the original MinnowBoard which was a step in the right direction, but there were some complains, as the company had chosen to use an older Intel processor, and the price was much higher than most high performance low cost ARM development boards. MinnowBoard MAX (aka Minnow2 Board) fixes all that, as it features the latest Intel Bay Trail-I (E3800 series) processor, and costs as low as $99 for the single core version, and $129 for the dual core version.

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

Let’s jump directly to the specifications:

  • SoC – 64-bit Intel Atom E3815 (single-core, 1.46 GHz) or Atom E3825 (dual-core, 1.33 GHz) both with integrated Intel HD Graphics coming with Open Source hardware-accelerated drivers for Linux OS
  • System Memory – 1GB ($99 model) or 2GB ($129 model) DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 1x Micro SD card slot, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 8 MB SPI Flash for firmware (UEFI)
  • Video Output – micro HDMI connector
  • Audio Output
    • HDMI (digital)
    • Analog audio to become available via a separate Lure, the name for MinnowBoard expansion boards, which will be sold separately –
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet RJ-45 connector
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Debugging & Programming – Serial debug via FTDI cable (sold separately), programming header compatible with Dedi-Prog programmer, and JTAG via high-speed expansion port.
  • Expansion headers
    • Low-speed expansion port – 2×13 (26-pin) male 0.1″ pin header with access to SPI, I2C, I2S Audio, 2x UARTs (TTL-level), 8x GPIO (including 2x supporting PWM), +5V, and GND
    • High-speed expansion port –  60-pin, high-density connector with access to 1x PCIe Gen 2.0 Lane, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 1x USB 2.0 host, I2C, GPIO, JTAG, +5V, and GND
  • Dimensions – 99 x 74mm
  • Temperature Range –  0 – 70 deg C. Industrial temperature range may also be also available, but price will be higher, and has not been disclosed.
  • Power – 5V DC (Sold separately)

The board will run Debian GNU/Linux, Android 4.4 Kitkat, and be supported by the Yocto Project. It will boot with UEFI firmware stored in the 8MB SPI flash. The specifications also mention Intel HD graphics will be supported in Linux with open source graphics drivers, something that’s almost impossible to find for ARM development boards, although there has been some progress recently with the Raspberry Pi and Nvidia Tegra K1.  It will be an open source hardware board, and design files will be made available under Creative Commons licensing within weeks of production boards being available at distributors.

MinnowBoard MAX competes directly with quad core ARM Cortex A9 development board such as HardKernel ODROID, Wandboard, and so on, that sells for about the same price. We’ll need to check benchmarks to get a better idea of the performance.

The boards are scheduled to be manufactured by CircuitCo by the end of June 2014. You can’t pre-order them just yet, and they will be available through various distributors.  if you happen to be in EE Live! in San Jose, you can see a working demo with MinnowBoard MAX on booth #916.

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Linaro Connect Asia 2014 Opening Keynote – Status and Future of ARMv8 Linux & Android [Video]

March 3rd, 2014 No comments

Linaro Connect Asia 2014 has just started in Macau today and will take place until Friday. You can follow the sessions live and/or their recordings via Linaro OnAir YouTube Channel. I’ve watched the opening keynote, and embedded the video at the bottom of this post. The keynote focuses on ARMv8 for Linux and Android on servers, mobile devices, digital home, and more, and involves two main speakers: George Grey, Linaro CEO , and Jon Masters, Chief ARM Architecture at Red Hat.

Linaro_Connected_Asia_2014

The speaker beginning of the video provides some practical information and the schedule for Linaro Connect. The keynote itself really starts around 15:50 with George Grey who spends the first 10 minutes introducing the latest Linaro members: Qualcomm, Mediatek, ZTE, AllWinner and Comcast. He then talks about the new Mobile sub-committee (MOBSCOM) that will focus on big.LITTLE, Android optimization and Android on ARMv8, as well as the soon-to-be-announced Linaro Digital Home Group composed of AllWinner, ARM, Comcast, Fujitsu, HiSilicon, and STMicro, that will work on STB / IPTV software implementation such as secure media playback. A large part of the talk is about boot architecture (ACPI, UEFI, ARM Trusted firmware…), and the debates ACPI vs FDT (Device Tree), U-boot vs UEFI, and so on. Other subjects discussed are ARM security with the recently formed Security Working Group, Virtualization, Middleware working on Aarch64 (LAMP and OpenJDK) and Android on 64-bit. The latter will require a lot more work, and actual hardware for validation of the work done on ARMv8 fast models, and to speed up code development. Finally he quickly mentions Linaro is still working on ARMv7 architecture, and preliminary work is done for Cortex-M with Yocto/OpenEmbedded support.

At the 50 minutes mark, Jon Masters takes over to talk about 64-bit ARM servers. He stresses several key points for ARM to be successful in the server market:

  1. Upstream first (to kernel.org), as Red Hat will only use code from mainline for servers
  2. Single binary required
  3. Must follow standards (SBSA, ACPI, UEFI…)
  4. Default to open (source and communication)

He explains that compared to last year hardware is now available, talks about hyperscale computing, and mention the “up to 25% market share for ARM servers in 2019″ quote from AMD. He explains there are challenges however, and the server market is much different from the embedded world, so CENH (Cute Embedded Nonsense Hacks) are not allowed for ARM servers. Long term (10+ years) support for toolchain and kernel are needed, with backports if necessary, and Fedora/Red Hat will never ever release an OS with a device tree file and/or U-Boot.

Finally he announces a Red Hat ARM Server Developer Preview will be released later this year, compliant with SBSA, and using UEFI and ACPI, and show demo running on Applied Micro X-gene Mustang board running an early version of the developer preview which boots with UEFI, and supports ACPI.

Watch the full keynote below for details (1h30).

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Linaro 14.02 Release with Linux Kernel 3.14 and Android 4.4.2

February 28th, 2014 No comments

Linaro 14.02 has just been released with Linux Kernel 3.14-rc3 (baseline), Linux Kernel 3.10.30 (LSK), and Android 4.4.2 r2.

There are been a lot of patches for Linaro members boards, and including the latest GTS big.LITTLE processing patch, as well as speeds up to Android 4.4 performance. There’s also a Linux image (password protected) for Huawei D01 board with a 16-core ARM Cortex A15 @ 1.5 GHz SoC with up to 64 GB memory, that must be an unannounced SoC for base stations or other network equipment.  This month Linaro also made two important announcements: Qualcomm is now a Linaro member, and the Linaro Security Working Group (SWG) has been setup to develop open source secure software for the ARM architecture. The first projects will be reference implementations of the W3C Embedded Media Extension (EME), and secure boot for the 64-bit ARM Cortex-A series processors. They’ll also work on security for the Linux kernel.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linaro Stable Kernel (LSK) 3.10.30-2014.02 released – Updated to latest version of GTS patch set for big.LITTLE, and Android support (from Google and Linaro)
  • Linux Linaro 3.14-rc3-2014.02 released
    • gator version 5.17 (same as in 2014.01)
    • new version of the Android topic (linaro-android-3.14-merge) by John Stultz
    • uprobes v5 (new version)
    • new cortex-strings-arm64 topic (optimized memcpy, memmove, memset, memcmp, strcmp, and strlen functions)
    • updated big-LITTLE-pmu topic from ARM LT
    • updated basic Capri board support from Broadcom LT (updates to gpio driver and clock framework support)
    • updated big endian topic
    • updated Arndale_Octa/Arndale/Origen patches from Samsung LT
    • updated Versatile Express patches and added vexpress64 support (FVP Base and Foundation models) from ARM LT
    • updated K3V2 board support from HiSilicon LT
    • config fragments changes – added config fragments for uprobes/kprobe, android.conf: enable CONFIG_SYNC and family, add ION configs.lt-arndale.conf and lt-arndale-octa.conf introduced to hold the options specific for linux-linaro tree
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.02- Include a Fortran compiler, updated to Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.02 release, updated Newlib to 2.1, featuring various optimizations and better aarch64 support
  • Linaro Android 14.02 released:
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.02
    • updated to the 4.4.2_r2 upstream version
    • memory handling functions from cortex-strings have been merged into Bionic, leading to significant speedups
    • updated pm-qa to 0.4.7
    • improved CTS and methanol test results
    • Linaro Android tree can now be built with gcc 4.9 without modifications
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.02 released:
    • updated OpenDataPlane to track git
    • added LNG x86 machines
    • merged toolchain fixes, contributed by Khem Raj
    • integrated 2014.02 toolchain
    • added extra tools to images (build-essential, git, xz) to enable more test suites at runtime
    • enabled GRUB2 for aarch64
    • included EFI/ACPI related tools for LEG
    • upstreaming – added mongodb recipe, fixed curl and git SSL issues, submitted git 1.9.0 recipe, updated LTP recipe
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.02 released
    • added startup-nsh package, contains startup script used to boot with UEFI
    • updated packages: u-boot-linaro-arndale-octa (support HDMI audio and network boot), idlestat
  • Linux Linaro LNG 3.10.27-2014.02 released – Updated to PREEMPT_RT patchset rt25
  • Linux Linaro LT HiSilicon 3.14-rc1-2014.02 released – Included support for K3V2
  • Linaro UEFI 2014.02 is released (source only)
  • Linaro Image Tools 2014.02 released – Added Arndale Octa support for Android builds
  • Linaro Test Suites 2014.02 released
    • Openembedded SDK tests modifications
    • jtreg: updates to blacklist
    • ACPI: updated maintainers and removed ABAT
    • ubuntu/exec-latency.yaml: Add new test
    • Add openembedded smoke tests
    • pmqa: run sanity file before starting tests
    • is-cpu-isolated: Print exact isolation time instead of STRESS_DURATION
    • is-cpu-isolated: Check again if stress is already completed or not
    • KVM: added parsing hackbench measurements
    • aapits: Update git repo link
    • is-cpu-isolated: Increase stress duration to analyze interruptions
    • Add lshw test
    • netperf-client: fix set local_ip to the correct ip
    • netperf-server: if netserver started pass else start it
    • OE/netperf: adding mac mapping table for the LNG-lab
    • common/scripts/netperf-client: tee to view output
    • network-test-basic: Add support for different interface
  • Linaro PM QA 0.4.7-2014.02 released
    • cpuhotplug: skip hotplug check for cpu0
    • added common function to check the userid
    • test feature supported before running suite
  • Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.02 released – Based off the latest GCC 4.8.3+svn207411 release, ARM-v8 crypto intrinsics support, new vectorizer cost model
  • Linaro Newlib 2.1.0-2014.02 released – Based off the latest upstream newlib release, resynced with upstream newlib trunk, added specs file for ARM validation model,provided ftruncate() and truncate() stubs for ARM and AArch64

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1402/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB and community builds, Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain (GCC / Qemu) components.

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Linaro 14.01 Release with Linux Kernel 3.13 and Android 4.4.2

January 31st, 2014 No comments

The first release of the year, Linaro 14.01, is now out with Linux Kernel 3.13 (baseline), Linux Kernel 3.10.28 (LSK), Android 4.4.2, and Ubuntu Linaro 14.01.

The most important part of this release is support for Arndale Octa, which makes big.LITTLE processing code available to a low cost platform. Android 4.4.x is now on par with Android 4.3 in terms of support. Linaro has also decided to provide quarterly stable released with GCC, and Linaro GCC 4.7-2014.01 is the first quarterly stable release with the next one planned with Linaro 14.04.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linaro Stable Kernel (LSK) 3.10.28-2014.01 with latest version of GTS patch set for big.LITTLE, and Android support
  • Linux Linaro 3.13-2014.01:
    • gator version 5.17
    • updated linaro-android-3.13-merge topic by John Stultz, the “Revert “PM / Sleep: Require CAP_BLOCK_SUSPEND to use wake_lock/wake_unlock” patch included
    • uprobes v4
    • updated big-LITTLE-pmu topic from ARM Landing Team (LT)
    • updated basic Capri board support from Broadcom LT (clock framework support added)
    • Arndale Octa board support added by Samsung LT
    • updated Versatile Express patches from ARM LT
    • updated big endian topic
    • vexpress64 support (FVP Base and Foundation models)
    • config fragments changes: BeagleBone / BeagleBoneBlack config fragment created, more config options enabled for libvirt support, virtio mmio support enabled in vexpress.conf.
  • Linaro Toolchain Binaries 2014.01 including Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.01, with enhanced multilib support.
  • Linaro Android 14.01
    • libjpeg-turbo refreshed on Android builds from the Graphics Working Group
    • Kernel CI loop for Android was streamlined for stability and faster builds
    • built with Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.01
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2014.01
    • updated LTP to 20140115 releases
    • updated apica-tools to 20131218 release
    • integrated OpenDataPlane
    • merged external toolchain fixes contributed from Freescale
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.01
    • allowed native builds for OpenJDK 8
    • upstreaming: updated acpica-tools to the latest release, updated LTP (Linux Test Project) to the latest release, added Aarch64 support to GRUB2, added Aarch64 support to klibc
  • Linaro Ubuntu 14.01
    • Added packages to support Arndale Octa: arndale-octa-pre-boot, linux-linaro-arndale-octa and u-boot-linaro-arndale-octa
    • Added idlestat package
    • Packages updated: edk2-uefi, flash-kernel, gator and sbsigntool
  • Linux Linaro LNG 3.10.25-2014.01 – PREEMPT_RT patchset rt23, Arndale support
  • Linux Linaro LT HiSilicon 3.13-rc2-2014.01
    • Supports both K3V2 board and S40V200 FPGA board.
    • K3V2 support includes: basic soc, smp, hotplug, clock, i2c, touch, regulator, mmc. S40V200 support includes basic soc, smp, hotplug, clock
    • Integrated into the linux-linaro tree, and HiSilicon BSP code is now available in linux-linaro monthly releases
  • Linaro UEFI 2014.01
    • Rebased to Tianocore EDK2 SVN revision 14795
    • the latest version of the EDK2 code contains support for aarch64 plaforms upstream.
  • Linaro Image Tools 2014.01 – Arndale Octa support
  • Linaro Test Suites 2014.01
    • Android: Added Ethernet Test for Linaro Android
    • Ubuntu: Added WiFi Test for Linux Linaro Ubuntu
    • ltp: Improve parser & add tests
    • netperf: Add parameters and default to eth0
    • acpica-tools: Add acpica-tools test defination
    • ubuntu: Added acpi-smoke-test
    • acpica asl: Update source repository link
    • ltp-realtime: Parse ltp-realtime results for LAVA measurements
    • ubuntu: Added SD MMC Test for Linaro Ubuntu
    • ubuntu: Added Gator Data Streaming Test for Linaro Ubuntu
    • android: Added SD MMC Test for Linaro Android
    • Fixed parse pattern in min_max_avg_parse.py
    • mauve: move the tests instead of making a copy
    • ubuntu: remove unnecessary clone operation
    • oe: remove unnecessary clone operation
    • hackbench: Running hackbench properly with timeout and removed background dd
    • ubuntu/ltp-network: add ltp network test
    • netperf: set the result to skip, remove Sz in test name
  • Linaro idlestat – Tool which can show how long a CPU or cluster enters idle state with information gathered using traces from trace-cmd or ftrace tools
  • Linaro GCC 4.8-2014.01 with enhanced multilib support
  • Linaro GCC 4.7-2014.01

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1401/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB and community builds, Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain (GCC / Qemu) components.

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