STMicro STM32WL Wireless MCU Gets Wireless M-Bus Stack for Smart Meters

STM32WL Wireless M-Bus Stack

STMicro STM32WL was introduced as the world’s first LoRa SoC last year as it combined an STM32L4 Arm Cortex-M4 microcontroller with Semtech SX126x LoRa radio. The company has now partnered with Stackforce to develop a wireless M-Bus (wM-Bus) software stack that leverages the integrated sub-GHz radio and multiple modulation schemes supported by STM32WL microcontrollers. Wireless M-Bus (Wireless Meter Bus) is a wireless protocol specifically designed for remote reading of smart meters, generally gas, water, or electricity meters. The wM-Bus stack developed by Stackforce is said to comply with most of EN 13757-3/-7 specifications from lower to upper layers. The stack notably supports Wireless M-BUS modes S, T and C used throughout Europe in the 868MHz band, as well as the mode N for operation at 169MHz that also happens to be Wize frequency. Stackforce Wireless M-Bus stack for STM32WL also meets requirements for several other metering standards, including the Open Metering System (OMS) specification, the Dutch Smart Meter Requirements (DSMR), …

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Linux powered STMicro STM32MP1 Solder-down QFN-Style SoM Measures 27x27mm

STM32MP1 Solder-down QSMP SoM

STMicro STM32MP1 Cortex A7/M4 processor was launched last year with support for Linux and Android. Since then we’ve seen a few STM32MP1 SBC‘s, development kit and modules,  with some of the latter really compact with DHCOR STM32MP157 SoM found on Avenger96 board measuring just 29x29mm. Direct Insight has now unveiled QFN-style solder-down QSMP systems-on-module based on STM32MP1 that measure just 27 x 27 x 2.3mm and manufactured in Germany by Ka-Ro Electronics. Direct Insight / Ka-Ro STM32MP1 QSMP modules specifications: SoC QSMP-1510 module – STMicro STM32MP151A single-core Cortex-A7 processor up to 650 Mhz, plus Arm Cortex-M4 real-time core up to 200 MHz QSMP-1530 module – STMicro STM32MP153A dual-core Cortex -A7 processor up to 650 MHz, plus Arm Cortex-M4 real-time core up to 200 MHz QSMP-1570 module – STM32MP157C dual-core Cortex -A7 processor up to 650 MHz, plus Arm Cortex-M4 real-time core up to 200 MHz and Vivante 3D GPU with OpenGL ES 2.0 support System memory & Storage QSMP-1510 – …

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Linux 5.7 Released – Main Changes, Arm, MIPS and RISC-V Architectures

Linux 5.7 Changelog

OK… I’m a bit late on that one. Linus Torvalds released Linux 5.7 last week: So we had a fairly calm last week, with nothing really screaming “let’s delay one more rc”. Knock wood – let’s hope we don’t have anything silly lurking this time, like the last-minute wifi regression we had in 5.6.. But embarrassing regressions last time notwithstanding, it all looks fine. And most of the discussion I’ve seen the last week or two has been about upcoming features, so the merge window is now open  and I’ll start processing pull requests tomorrow as usual. But in the meantime, please give this a whirl. We’ve got a lot of changes in 5.7 as usual (all the stats look normal – but “normal” for us obviously pretty big and means “almost 14 thousand non-merge commits all over, from close to two thousand developers”), So the appended shortlog is only the small stuff that came in this last week since …

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Stinger96 (NB-IoT + eMTC) and Avenger96 96Boards STM32MP1 SBCs Giveaway

96boards Avenger96 & Stinger96 SBC Giveaway

96Boards,  Arrow Electronics, STMicro, and Shiratech have joined hands to organize a giveaway event with up to 500 Avenger96 or Stinger96 boards going to lucky winners. I’ve already covered STM32MP1 powered Avenger96 SBC compliant with 96boards CE Extended specification, but I’ve never heard about Stinger96 board, so before going into the giveaway rules, let’s have a closer look at this new 96Boards board designed by Israel based Shiratech. Stinger96 96Boards NB-IoT + eMTC SBC Specifications: SoC – STMicro STM32MP157 dual-core Arm Cortex-A7 processor @ up to 650 MHz (4158 CoreMark) with Arm Cortex-M4F MCU @ up to 200 MHz (673 CoreMark), 708KB internal SRAM System Memory – 256M x 32-bit DDR3 (1GB RAM) Storage – 8Gbit SLC NAND Flash, MicroSD card slot Connectivity Gigabit Ethernet header (via Microchip KSZ9031RNX) GPS, NB-IoT & eMTC (LTE Cat M1) IoT cellular connectivity with 2G fallback via Quectel BG96 module, SIM card slot, and 2x u.FL connectors; up to 300 Kbps DL, 375 Kbps …

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Qt for MCUs 1.1 Adds Support for more STM32 and NXP i.MX RT Boards, FreeRTOS

Qt for MCUs 1.1 Installer

The first stable version of Qt for MCUs was released in August 2019 in order to bring Qt graphical toolkit to microcontrollers such as STMicro STM32F7,  Renesas RH850, or NXP i.MX RT1050.   Qt for MCUs would run bare metal on supported boards, and software engineers would develop graphical interface using QML and C++. Qt for MCUs 1.1 has just been released with the addition of more STM32 and i.MX RT boards, support for FreeRTOS real-time operating system, and more. Qt for MCUs 1.1 highlights: Five new supported boards:  NXP i.MX RT 1064 EVK, STM32 H750B-DK, STM32 F469i-disco, STM32 L4R9i-disco, and STM32 L4R9i-eval Asset management Optional PNG compressions for assets to lower storage footprint Option to read data directly from flash memory for lower RAM consumption, or copy to RAM for better performance, at the cost of higher RAM consumption. FreeRTOS support (technology preview) to run background tasks without blocking the Qt Quick user interface Qt Charts for MCUs (technology preview) …

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Linux 5.6 Release – Main Changes, Arm, MIPS & RISC-V Architectures

Linux 5.6 Changelog

Linus Torvalds has just announced the release of Linux 5.6 on the Linux Kernel Mailing List: So I’ll admit to vacillating between doing this 5.6 release and doing another -rc. This has a bit more changes than I’d like, but they are mostly from davem’s networking fixes pulls, and David feels comfy with them. And I looked over the diff, and none of it looks scary. It’s just slightly more than I’d have preferred at this stage – not doesn’t really seem worth delaying a release over. So about half the diff from the final week is network driver fixlets, and some minor core networking fixes. Another 20% is tooling – mostly bpf and netfilter selftests (but also some perf work). The rest is “misc” – mostly random drivers (gpio, rdma, input) and DTS files. With a smattering of fixes elsewhere (a couple of afs fixes, some vm fixes, etc). The shortlog is appended, nothing really looks all that exciting, …

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How to Detect STM32 Fakes

Real vs Fake STM32

STMicro STM32 microcontrollers are very popular, and it’s a well-known fact there are some fakes on the market. What I did not know is that many don’t even pass the blinky test. I learned this in Greaseweazle Github repository, a “tools and USB interface for accessing a floppy drive at the raw flux level”, where keirf explains how to detect STM32 fakes, notable clones of STM32F103C8 found in Bluepill board. The photo above shows a real STM32F103C8T6 microcontroller, and all should have the similar top marking and only one circular depression on the bottom left to indicate pin 1. keirf goes on to show two boards that are sold as STM32F103C8T6 Bluepill boards, and it’s fairly straightforward to point out the differences by just looking at the chips. The ugly part is that both fail the blinky sample. The first one is very easy to spot since the part number starts with “STM32FEB”, and it does not appear to be …

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Google Pigweed Libraries Streamline Embedded Software Development on 32-bit Microcontrollers

Pigweed pw_watch

There are many components required for embedded software development, including cross-toolchain, a build system like buildroot or YoCto Project, and debugging tools like OpenOCD.  Once you’ve installed those, development involving several steps including building the code, flashing it to the board, and then running the program on the target. Google would like to make embedded software development to be as easy as web development as possible, similar to editing a file and running it in a web browser, so they’ve just released Pigweed open-source collection of embedded-targeted libraries/modules to streamline the development process for 32-bit microcontrollers such as STMicro STM32L452 or Nordic Semi nRF52832. Pigweed aims to help all steps of the process including tools/environment setup, program development, and code submission. Setup consists of running a bootstrap script that will automatically install tools such as Python 3.8, clang-format, and an Arm compiler in a virtual environment in order to leave the system’s default environment unmodified. There are several development “pw_” …

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