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Posts Tagged ‘debian’

BeagleBone Black Gets 4GB Flash, a Price Increase, and Better Availability

April 18th, 2014 No comments

The BeagleBone Black has been launched about a year ago, and this low cost ARM Linux board has become pretty popular with hobbyists, robotics courses at universities, and even people making products. The downside is that it has been difficult for CircuitCo, the manufacturer, to keep producing enough boards to match the demand while keeping the price at a low $45 with very little margin, and there are currently about 150,000 boards on distributor back-orders. To improve availability, Beagleboard.org has announced Revision C of the BeagleBone Black with a 4 GB eMMC, which may be easier to source over time than the original 2 GB eMMC, and that will sell for about $5 to $15 more than the previous version, or between $50 and $60.

Embest BeagleBone Black (Clone) vs CircuitCo BeagleBone Black

Embest BeagleBone Black (Clone) vs CircuitCo BeagleBone Black

The rest of the hardware specifications remain identical. There’s also a change on the software side, as the board will be pre-loaded with Debian, instead of Angstrom, in order to lower the learning curve for novices.

To further improve availability of the board, Beagleboard.org has also partnered with Element14, through their subsidiary Embest, in order to manufacture BeagleBone Black clones via a newly introduced BeagleBoard Compliant logo program. Embest has been manufacturing BeagleBone Black clones for the Chinese market for a while. You can see the clone and original side by side on the picture above. I’d assume the new Element14 BeagleBone Black will have the BeagleBoard logo after their partnership with the community.

Manufacturing of the BeagleBone Black revision B will stop on May 5, and it’s not  clear if it is still possible to order the $45 version of the board. BeagleBone Black Rev C is already available for pre-order online via stores such as Hackertronics’s Makertronic store ($55), Sparkfun ($55), RP Electronics ($57.78), and Tigal (47.50 Euros + VAT). Shipment is expected as early as April 29. I can also see a BeagleBone Black is currently available on Element14 for $45 but with the status “awaiting delivery” of stock, so they may still take orders for the Rev B version.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Raspberry Pi Compute Module is a $30 Raspberry Pi Compatible System-on-Module

April 9th, 2014 No comments

Albeit the initial goal of the Raspberry Pi board was to address computer science education, it has become extremely popular with hobbyists, has made its way in many different kinds of hardware, and is now clearly the number 1 low cost ARM Linux development board. The Raspberry Pi foundation has then decided to design and sell a system-on-module called Raspberry Pi Compute that people can use in actual products.

Raspberry Pi Compute (Left) and Raspberry Pi Board (Right)

Raspberry Pi Compute (Left) and Raspberry Pi Board (Right)

Since the module will be mostly software compatible with the original Raspberry Pi board, the specs are similar:

  • SoC – Broadcom BCM2835 ARM 11 processor @ 700 MHz with Videocore IV GPU
  • System Memory – 512MB RAM
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC Flash
  • SoM Connector – DDR2 200-pins SODIMM
  • Dimensions – 67.6x30mm board which fits into a standard DDR2 SODIMM connector

The main difference is they’ve replaced the SD card slot found in the board, by an eMMC module which is more appropriate, and should provide better performance, for products. The foundation has also made a baseboard called “IO Board” for the Compute Module, in order to kickstart development while your custom PCB is being designed. It includes an HDMI output, a full sized USB port, 2 micro USB ports, some flat headers for camera and LCD displays, and two 2×30 pin headers to easily access the signals available via the SODIMM connectors.

Raspberry Pi IO Board and Compute Module

Raspberry Pi IO Board and Compute Module

The module will most probably support all distributions available for the RPi (Raspbian, Fedora, Arch Linux ARM,  etc..) as source code and tools should be identical too. The IO board will be open source. For now the foundation has only released the schematics of the IO Board and Compute module in PDF format, but more documents will be released soon.

A “Raspberry Pi Compute Module Development Kit” comprised of the Compute Module and IO Board should be available from RS and Element14 in June. The price of the devkit has not been disclosed, but the Compute Module will start selling in the summer for $30 per unit in batches of 100. Individual orders will also be possible at an higher price.

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Novena Open Source Hardware ARM Laptop Gets Crowdfunded for $1995

April 4th, 2014 2 comments

In 2012, Andrew Huang (“Bunnie”) decided to build an open source hardware and software laptop codenamed Novena powered by Freescale i.MX6 as a side project. The goal of the project was to be fully open source, both in terms of hardware and software, and the components have been selected so that the datasheets can be downloaded without NDA. Design has now been completed, and a crowdfunding campaign has now been launched on Crowd Supply, but since finding low cost part was not priority, you’ll have to fork $1,995 to get the complete laptop, $1,195 will get you the desktop version, and $500 the motherboard only. There’s also a version of the laptop called “Heirloom Laptop” with a hand-crafted wood and aluminum case that goes for $5,000.

Novena_Open_Source_Hardware_Laptop

Novena Laptop

Let’s go through the board specs first:

  • SoC – Freescale iMX6 Quad-core Cortex A9 CPU with NEON FPU @ 1.2 GHz. – NDA-free datasheet and programming manual
  • System Memory – 64-bit, DDR3-1066 SO-DIMM slot. 4GB DDR3 SO-DIMM will be installed in the shipped products.
  • Storage – Boots from microSD firmware, SATA-II (3Gbps) connector
  • Internal ports & sensors:
    • mini PCI-express slot
    • UIM slot for mPCIx mobile data card support
    • Dual-channel LVDS LCD connector with USB2.0 side-channel for a display-side camera
    • Resistive touchscreen controller
    • Stereo 1.1W, 8-ohm internal speaker connectors
    • 2x USB2.0 internal connectors for keyboard and mouse/trackpad
    • Digital microphone (optional, not populated by default)
    • 3-axis accelerometer
    • 3x internal UART ports
  • External ports:
    • HDMI
    • SD card reader
    • headphone + mic port (compatible with most mobile phone headsets, supports sensing in-line cable buttons)
    • 2x USB 2.0 ports, supporting high-current (1.5A) device charging
    • 1Gbit ethernet
  • Other features:
    • 100 Mbit ethernet – dual Ethernet capability allows laptop to be used as an in-line packet filter or router
    • USB OTG – enables laptop to spoof/fuzz ethernet, serial, etc. over USB via gadget interface to other USB hosts
    • Utility serial EEPROM – for storing crash logs and other bits of handy data
    • Spartan-6 CSG324-packaged FPGA – has several interfaces to the CPU, including a 2Gbit/s (peak) RAM-like bus — for your bitcoin mining needs. Or whatever else you might want to toss in an FPGA.
    • High-speed I/O expansion header – useful for implementing a wide variety of functions, from simple GPIO breakouts to high-performance analog data sampling front-ends

Beside the 4GB RAM, the board with also come with a microSD card with basic Debian install, Ath9k (blob-free firmware) mPCIe wifi card, 802.11n b/g 1T1R and a 16V, 3.75A power supply (100-240V 50/60Hz input).

The desktop version will come with a gen-2 hacker case, a 13.3″ TFT  LCD (1080P), an LVDS to eDP adapter board, and some other accessories such as cables.

The laptop version will features all hardware from the desktop version but add a battery controller board, a 240 GB SSD, a 3000mAh 3-cell lithium battery pack, measure 330 mm x 225 mm x 27mm and weight 1.36 kg. The keyboard is not included.

$5,000 Heirloom Laptop

$5,000 Heirloom Laptop

Since these laptops and desktop PC are fully open source, you can download the hardware design files, get the source code, and build the Linux distribution yourself without binary blobs.

The board should ship in November 2014, the All-in-one desktop in December 2014, the laptop in January 2015, and Heirloom laptop in February 2015.

Via Liliputing

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$99 MinnowBoard MAX Development Board Powered by Intel Bay Trail-I SoC

April 1st, 2014 8 comments

When Intel released the original MinnowBoard which was a step in the right direction, but there were some complains, as the company had chosen to use an older Intel processor, and the price was much higher than most high performance low cost ARM development boards. MinnowBoard MAX (aka Minnow2 Board) fixes all that, as it features the latest Intel Bay Trail-I (E3800 series) processor, and costs as low as $99 for the single core version, and $129 for the dual core version.

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

MinnowBoard MAX (Click to Enlarge)

Let’s jump directly to the specifications:

  • SoC – 64-bit Intel Atom E3815 (single-core, 1.46 GHz) or Atom E3825 (dual-core, 1.33 GHz) both with integrated Intel HD Graphics coming with Open Source hardware-accelerated drivers for Linux OS
  • System Memory – 1GB ($99 model) or 2GB ($129 model) DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 1x Micro SD card slot, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 8 MB SPI Flash for firmware (UEFI)
  • Video Output – micro HDMI connector
  • Audio Output
    • HDMI (digital)
    • Analog audio to become available via a separate Lure, the name for MinnowBoard expansion boards, which will be sold separately –
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000M Ethernet RJ-45 connector
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 host, 1x USB 2.0 host
  • Debugging & Programming – Serial debug via FTDI cable (sold separately), programming header compatible with Dedi-Prog programmer, and JTAG via high-speed expansion port.
  • Expansion headers
    • Low-speed expansion port – 2×13 (26-pin) male 0.1″ pin header with access to SPI, I2C, I2S Audio, 2x UARTs (TTL-level), 8x GPIO (including 2x supporting PWM), +5V, and GND
    • High-speed expansion port -  60-pin, high-density connector with access to 1x PCIe Gen 2.0 Lane, 1x SATA2 3Gb/sec, 1x USB 2.0 host, I2C, GPIO, JTAG, +5V, and GND
  • Dimensions – 99 x 74mm
  • Temperature Range -  0 – 70 deg C. Industrial temperature range may also be also available, but price will be higher, and has not been disclosed.
  • Power – 5V DC (Sold separately)

The board will run Debian GNU/Linux, Android 4.4 Kitkat, and be supported by the Yocto Project. It will boot with UEFI firmware stored in the 8MB SPI flash. The specifications also mention Intel HD graphics will be supported in Linux with open source graphics drivers, something that’s almost impossible to find for ARM development boards, although there has been some progress recently with the Raspberry Pi and Nvidia Tegra K1.  It will be an open source hardware board, and design files will be made available under Creative Commons licensing within weeks of production boards being available at distributors.

MinnowBoard MAX competes directly with quad core ARM Cortex A9 development board such as HardKernel ODROID, Wandboard, and so on, that sells for about the same price. We’ll need to check benchmarks to get a better idea of the performance.

The boards are scheduled to be manufactured by CircuitCo by the end of June 2014. You can’t pre-order them just yet, and they will be available through various distributors.  if you happen to be in EE Live! in San Jose, you can see a working demo with MinnowBoard MAX on booth #916.

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$30 CoreWind Tech WiFiG25 SoM Features Atmel SAM9G25 ARM9 Processor and a Wi-Fi Module

March 31st, 2014 3 comments

After their Aria G25 clone, called CORE9G25, CoreWind Tech has now launched a new SoM, WiFiG25, also powered by Atmel SAM9G25 ARM9 processor, but this time with a WiFi Module based on Realtek RTL8188, and up to 256 MB RAM, 256 MB Flash.

WiFiG25Here are the specs of this system-on-module:

  • CPU - Atmel AT91SAM9G25 ARM9 @ 400Mhz
  • System Memory – 128 or 256 MB DDR2
  • Storage – 256MB NAND Flash, micro SD card slot
  • Connectivity – WiFi Module with internal antenna
  • 2x20Pin 2.54mm expand interface (through holes) with access to 2x USB host ports, 3x UART, 1x I2C, 1x SPI, 6x PWM, 27x GPIOs, and 4x 10-bit ADC
  • Line level – TTL 3.3V
  • Misc – User LED
  • Power supply – 5V
  • Dimensions – Size: 50.80 x 30 mm
  • Weight – 5g
  • Temperature range -  Commercial: 0 to 70 °C, or industrial: -20 to 85 °C

The company provide Linux 3.6.9 for the board, as well as a rootfs built with buildroot bootable from NAND (and pre-installing), and a Debian image that can boot from micro SD card. You can find documentation for builroot and Debian on the company’s website, as well as some more details on AT91.com. Schematics (PDF) and mechanical information (PNG) are both available online.

WiFiG25 SoM is available now, and at least until 2023 (10 years availability), for price ranging between $29.90 to $45 depending on RAM configuration, and temperature range options. Further information is available on CoreWind Tech WiFiG25 page.

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ITEAD Studio IBOX AllWinner A20 mini PC Review

March 24th, 2014 5 comments

ITEAD Studio IBOX is an AllWinner A20 based mini PC currently running Android or Linux distributions currently featured on Indiegogo. I’ve already written about IBOX in a separate post, where you can get all the specifications, but the company has also sent me a unit (engineering sample) for review. Since the system is still in development, and it’s mostly a development platform, I won’t do a review with video testing, system performance, etc… as usual, but rather show the progress and current issues in terms of hardware and software, and I’ll also mention documentation, and shortly try Android 4.2 (pre-installed) and the Debian 7.0 image released by the company.

IBOX Unboxing Pictures

I’ve received the device in a cartoon box containing the device itself and a 9V/2A power supply. If you are or become a backer on Indiegogo you’ll also receive an add-on board providing access to a SATA connector,  serial console connector, and Arduino compatible headers. I haven’t received this board, as it was not ready yet.

IBOX mini PC and Power Supply (Click to Enlarge)

IBOX mini PC and Power Supply (Click to Enlarge)

The front panel of the device features a microSD card slot, an LED (power), and an IR receiver. The rear panel comes with 4 USB boards (including one OTG port), an HDMI output, an optical S/PDIF output, an Ethernet port (10/100M), and a DC jack. On the left of the 4 USB port, you’ll use notice a “U-boot” button to enter into FEL mode (I presume).

IBOX Ports (Click to Enlarge)

IBOX Ports (Click to Enlarge)

Finally, there’s a 32-pin connector to connect add-on boards provided by the company, and your own custom boards. This connector gives access to several signals including SATA, USB, 4x UART, 1x SPI, 1x I2C, LCD, TVOUT, LINE IN, and power (5V, 3V3, VIN, GND). You can find the complete pinout here. If you prefer unboxing videos, I’ve filmed one too.

IBOX is mostly a development platform, and although it comes with an (aluminum) enclosure, it’s been made to opened. You just need to remove 4 screws to take the PCB out. Taking it out in this sample was a little tricky, but the company told me they will slightly reduce the board size in the final version to make disassembly easier.

Top of IBOX Board with A20 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

Top of IBOX Board with A20 SoM (Click to Enlarge)

You can see the system is composed of baseboard and the company’s A10/A20 CORE module that can be purchased separatly for your own designs. They are also working on A31 CORE module. If you want to make your own board to connect the 32-pin male socket on the right of the picture, they sell the female connector for $1.20. I’ve asked for a good way to remove the module from the baseboard, but they told it was OK to remove it, but it was “hard work”. So I gave up on that idea…

Bottom of IBOX Board (Click to Enlarge)

Bottom of IBOX Board (Click to Enlarge)

There’s nothing much on the bottom of the board either. The baseboard design appears to be fairly simple with most complexity moves to the computer-on-module. You may notice the board has been reworked with two wires on the bottom of the picture, this will be fixed in the final version of the PCB. Please also note the two 10V / 470 uF capacitors on the right of the board, I’ll mention them later in the post.

I’ll update the post with high resolution picture of the add-on board, if/once the company sends photos.

First Boot with Android 4.2

The computer comes pre-loaded by Android 4.2.2 in the 4GB NAND flash. After connecting an Ethernet cable (no built-in Wi-Fi), and HDMI cable, a USB keyboard, an RF dongle for an air mouse, I connected the power supply to get started.

Android 4.2 Home Screen on IBOX (Click for Original Size)

Android 4.2 Home Screen on IBOX (Click for Original Size)

There are two Android images available for the board “Android TV A20″ by ITEAD, abd “Android 4.2″ by CubieTech, which means this board is apparently compatible with Cubieboard2, and if there are differences these are simply handled by AllWinner Fex files. This also means you can use most of Cubieboard2 resources to develop for this board.

Using this image, Wi-Fi is enabled by default, but since there’s no Wi-Fi module, there’s not network, so I had to go Settings->More (in Wireless & Network section), and enable Ethernet there, which worked fine. Google Play is installed in this image, and I could connect using my existing account, but 50% or so of application I’ve tried can’t be installed because “this device isn’t compatible with this version”. So Antutu, Quadrant and Facebook could not be installed, and apps such as YouTube or Netflix could not be found in the search results in Google Play. This was a frequent error in the earlier HDMI TV stick, and just need some configuration changes in Android XML files. Other interesting tidbits are the kernel is 3.4.39, 480p/720p/1080p video output are supported (using 720p graphics), and audio pass-through may be supported.

I’ve also tried to connect a USB to TTL board via the 32-pin connector (pin 29 -> GND, and 9/10 Tx and TX), but it did not work. ITEAD told me they are looking into it. The system is usually pretty stable, but once as I ran ES Explorer to access CIFS/SAMBA shares, the Ethernet started to go on and off in cycle every 2 seconds or so, the Ethernet link was lost and recovered. So I checked my Ethernet connection and noticed the board was pretty hot. The CoM was at most at 57 C (normal), but the area around the two 10V capacitors got really hot, and I measured up to 88 C. This only happened once, and I was unable to reproduce the issue. I’ve informed the company, and hopefully it will be fixed with the final version.

For Android developers, the USB OTG port is the bottom right one (USB4), but I could not try it as I own the right type of cable.

Android & Linux Images

There are several images for IBOX that can boot from NAND or micro SD card as shown in the table below.

System Type NAND FLASH
SD Card
Android Android TV A20 (ITEAD) Android SD bootable image (LinkSprite)
Android 4.2 (Cubietech)
Linux Lubuntu (Cubietech) Debian 7.0 (ITEAD)
Cubian (Liu)
Arch ARM (Archlinuxarm.org)

Basically, these are all images that were made for the Cubieboard2, except the two made by ITEAD: Android 4.2, and Debian 7.0. I’ve tried the Debian 7.0 image using this alternative link, as the link above did not work. If you are familiar with AllWinner development, or even Raspberry Pi the installation procedure is pretty standard.

  1. In a Linux computer, after having inserted a micro SD card (replace SDX but you actual micro SD card device):
    wget https://www.dropbox.com/s/3utl042z7d9za2a/IteaduinoPlus-A20-debian-xfce-0.1-2014-02-26.img.bz2
    tar xvf IteaduinoPlus-A20-debian-xfce-0.1-2014-02-26.img.bz2
    sudo umount /dev/sdX1
    sudo umount /dev/sdX2
    sudo dd if=IteaduinoPlus-A20-debian-xfce-0.1-2014-02-26.img of=/dev/sdX ms=1M
    sync
  2. In a Windows computer, download the file, extract it, and run Win32DiskImager to flash the 2GB image to the micro SD card.

Then insert the micro SD card into IBOX, connect the power, and after a little while you should be able to login with root/root, and open a few pre-installed applications.

Debian 7.0 with Xfce (Click for Original Size)

Debian 7.0 with Xfce (Click for Original Size)

The system seems pretty responsive although I used a 4GB class 4 micro SD card. Tthe image is pretty minimal, as there’s no web browser, no real office suite or graphics tools.  firmware may need some work and customization. I could install gimp and libreoffice, but somehow Firefox and Chromium do not seem to be available with Debian 7.0. I also changed /etc/apt/sources.list to server to my country (defaults to China) for much faster downloads.

Documentation and Support

Proper documentation and support are as much as important of the hardware itself for development platforms. ITEAD Studio is mainly a hardware company, and they seem to have already done a relatively decent job by releasing some hardware files for the board. You can get the schematics, PCB layout, and gerber files with the baseboard, the schematics (PDF only) for A20 CORE module, as well as the board mechanical files via their Indiegogo page. There;s also a short datasheet for A10/A20 CORE CPU module.

On the software side, there are multiple OS images provided by ITEAD and third parties. The kernel and bootloader are all based on linux-sunxi work, and the company also has designed “ITEAD OS & SDK” with an API to easily access low level functions such as UART, GPIOs, I2C, SPI, etc… You can visit their github repo, not updated that often, to see more details.

At this stage however, there’s no Getting Started Guide, or User’s Manual, but I’ve been told this will be released on the 10th of April. Most procedures could probably be derived from linux-sunxi’s wiki. Support is available via IBOX / Iteaduini Plus forum, and some relevant articles sometimes pop up on the company’s blog.

Conclusion

ITEAD Studio IBOX is still work in progress, but hardware looks mostly OK. The firmware images I’ve tested still need more work, but this is rather typical for new development board, and if the community grows around the hardware they improve over time. Since this hardware is compatible with Cubieboard2, software support should be just as good in both boards.

IBOX is not really for consumers who expect a working product out of box, and it’s mainly interesting to developers, especially if you want to evaluation A20 CORE module for future product development. It can also be used as an AllWinner A20 development platform , in which case it competes with boards such as Cubieboard2 and Olimex’ OLinuXino-A20 boards. It also compete with Iteaduino Plus from the same company, but with (AllWinner) A10 CORE CPU module.

If you are interested, you can get the board with aluminum enclosure as shown in this review plus the add-on board for $70 via Indiegogo.

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Dedicated Hosting Services on ARM Development Boards (Cubieboard2, Raspberry Pi, ODROID…)

March 12th, 2014 11 comments

At least two companies have recently launched hosting services using dedicated ARM servers based on low cost development boards: NanoXion with its NX-BOX service powered by PiBox (Raspberry Pi) and CubieBox (Cubieboard 2) microservers, and miniNodes with servers based on Cubieboard2 first, then ODROID development boards, and possibly AllWinner OptimusBoard once/if it becomes available.

PiBox Dedicated Server

PiBox Dedicated Server

The PiBox will feature a Raspberry Pi Model B with 512 MB RAM, and 16GB Class 10 UHS-1 microSD card by Samsung, and the dual core Cubiebox comes with 1GB RAM and a Crucial M500 SATA III 120GB SSD. Both NX-BOXes run Linux Debian Server NX distribution, support instant remote reboot, with guaranteed 10 Mbps connectivity for IPv4 & IPv6, and unlimited bandwidth. The boards are all hosted in France.

The company expects their ARM servers to be used as private cloud servers, backup servers, private chat servers, web servers, mail servers, DNS Servers, monitoring servers, and well as some other proprietary solutions their customers may come up with.

Pricing starts at 7.19 Euros per month for the PiBox, 11.18 Euros per month for the Cubiebox, including an IPv6 address, and the service requires a commitment of one year.

miniNodes, which is US based, has just started yesterday to offer Cubieboard2 dedicated server for early adopters and enthusiasts. Cubieboard 2 features a dual core AllWinner A20 SoC @1.0 Ghz, 1 GB RAM, and 4 GB NAND that runs Ubuntu Server 13.04. There does not appear to have any external storage in their microservers at this stage, and bandwidth information is not available. The only option is currently hosting costs $19 US per month, but once they officially launch they’ll offer options to purchase clusters with up to 25 Cubieboard2 and more choices for the OS (Ubuntu or Fedora). If everything goes according to plan quad core hardkernel ODROID boards will be added to the line-up soon, and Allwinner Optimus Board powered by AllWinner A80 octa-core processor might also be considered.

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