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Posts Tagged ‘debian’

Qualcomm Starts Sampling of Qualcomm Centriq 2400 ARM Server SoC with Up to 48 ARMv8 Cores

December 8th, 2016 2 comments

Qualcomm has announced commercial sampling of Qualcomm Centriq 2400 series server SoC built with 10nm FinFET process technology and featuring up to 48 Qualcomm Falkor custom ARMv8 CPU cores “highly optimized to both high performance and power efficiency, and designed to tackle the most common datacenter workloads”.

qualcomm-centriq-2400-series-soc

Qualcomm Datacenter Technologies demonstrated the new processor in a Live demo showing Apache, Spark, Java, and Hadoop on Linux running on a SBSA compliant server powered by Qualcomm Centriq 2400 processor, but the company did not provide any further technical details or preliminary benchmark results for the solution.

The Qualcomm Centriq 2400 processor series is now sampling to select customers and is expected to be commercially available in H2 2017. That’s about all we know from the press release. However, Linaro have been working on Qualcomm Technologies QDF2432 based board for several months with support for Debian 8.x ‘Jessie’ and CentOS 7 operating systems, as well as Hadoop and OpenStack. It’s not 100% clear if this is indeed related to Centriq 2400, albeit the name QDF2432 seems to indicate so, and it would probably have started on some FPGA board to simulate Centriq 2400 (32-core?) processor, unless they had engineering samples for nearly a year. There’s also a basically empty page on Centos.org for “Qualcomm QDF2432 Server Dev Platform”. It’s close to impossible to find much details since those things are developed under NDAs.

PINEBOOK ARM Linux Laptop Powered by Allwinner A64 Processor to Sell for $89 and Up

November 24th, 2016 33 comments

Following up on Pine A64 board powered by Allwinner A64 quad core Cortex A53 processor, Pine64 has decided to work on a software compatible laptop based on the processor. PINEBOOK comes with 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash storage, a 11.6″ or 14″ display, and the usual ports you’d expect on such device.

pinebookPINEBOOK specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A64 quad core ARM Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2 GHz with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC 5.0 flash and micro SD slot up to 256 GB
  • Display – 11.6″ or 14″ IPS LCD display with 1280 x 720 resolution (no touchscreen)
  • Video Output – mini HDMI port for external display
  • Audio – HDMI, 3.5 mm headphone jack, built-in microphone and stereo speakers
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Camera – 1.2 MP camera
  • User Input Devices – Full size QWERTY keyboard, 5″ touchpad
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A
  • Battery – 10,000 mAh LiPo battery
  • Dimensions – 352 x 233 x 18 mm
  • Weight – 1.2 kg

The laptop is not based on Pine A64+ board, nor the upcoming SOPINE A64 module, and instead they had to design a custom board to meet the thickness requirements.

pinebook-connectorsPINEBOOK should support most of the operating systems supported by PINE A64(+) boards including Android 5.1/7.0, Remix OS, Debian, Ubuntu, and others, but the firmware requires some (minor) modifications since the laptop is using LPDDR3 RAM.

The laptop is not available for sale right now, but we know the 11.6″ version will cost $89, the 14″ version $99, and you can register to get notified of the launch. You may also find a few more details on PINEBOOK product page.

Banana Pi M2 Ultra Allwinner R40 Development Board with SATA & GbE Sells for $46

November 16th, 2016 33 comments

Allwinner A10 and A20 processors have been quite popular in the past, since they could handle Fast or Gigabit Ethernet and SATA natively, included decent multimedia capabilities, and were found in low cost hardware such as Cubieboard 2 or MeLE A1000. Since then we’ve had a few boards with SATA using newer and faster processors without SATA IP, meaning it was usually implemented using a USB 2.0 to SATA bridge leading to mediocre to average performance depending on the implementation and selected bridge. Allwinner R40 is the successor of Allwinner R20 with a faster quad core Cortex A7 processor, but keeping Gigabit Ethernet, SATA, and most features of its predecessor. The good news is that Banana Pi has now launched the promised M2 Ultra development board based on the new processor for $45.80 + shipping on Aliexpress (Total for me: $48.35).

allwinner-r40-development-boardBanana Pi M2 Ultra specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner R40 quad Core ARM Cortex A7 processor with ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 2G DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash (16, 32 or 64GB as options), SATA interface, micro SD slot up to 256 GB
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6212 module)
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 port up to 1080p60, 4-lane MIPI DSI display connector
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm headphone jack, built0in microphone
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI camera connector
  • Expansion – 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header with GPIOs, I2C, SPI, UART, ID EEPROM, 5V, 3.3V, GND signals.
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART for serial console
  • Misc – Reset, power, and u-boot buttons; IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 5V via barrel connector, or 3.7V Lithium battery via battery connector on the back of the board. AXP221s PMIC
  • Dimensions – 92 x 60 mm

Banana Pi claims BPI-M2 Ultra board run Android, Debian, Ubuntu, Raspbian, and other operating systems. You’ll find some images on the Wiki, and while the Android section link does not work, and you can download a Linux 3.10 + busybox image, Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial minimal, Debian 8 Jessie Mate, Debian 8 Jessie Lite, and Ubuntu MATE 16.04 from either baidu or Google drive links. There’s also a Tina-IOT os section that’s empty right now, as is the “source code on github” section, and a few others. So documentation is work in progress.

banana-pi-m2-ultraI’m expecting Allwinner R40 boards to become popular at least for some communities such as armbian, where some members require  fast storage and networking performance for their project(s). We’ll have to hope Allwinner has improved SATA write performance compared to Allwinner A20, as in my review of Cubietruck (Metal Case), I found that while read speed was very good at up to 180 MB/s, write speed was limited to around 36 MB/s using a SATA SSD.

You may also find some more details on Banana Pi BPI-M2 Ultra product page.

Inforce Computing Introduces 6301 SoM and Devkit Powered by Snapdragon 410E SoC with Long Term Availability

November 4th, 2016 3 comments

Qualcomm launched Snapdragon 410E and 600E processors for the embedded market at the end of September, meaning the processors were easy to source by any company, not matter how small they are, and the company would now offer long term availability often required for embedded systems. Inforce Computing is now leveraging the new Snapdragon 410E processor with their Inforce 6301 micro SoM, and corresponding development kit.

snapdragon-400e-system-on-module-somInforce 6301 micro SoM specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 410E (APQ8016 SoC) quad core ARM Cortex A53 processor @ 1.2GHz, Adreno 306 GPU, and Hexagon DSP @ 700MHz
  • Memory – 1GB LPDDR3 @ 533MHz  (Option: 2GB)
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC v4.5 flash (Option up to 64GB) NAND, 1x micro SD card interface with support up to HS200
  • Connectivity – Bluetooth 4.1 LE, Wi-Fi dual stream 802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4GHz (WC3620), on-board GPS/GNSS/BeiDou/Galileo (WGR7640)
  • Video – H.264/263 playback and capture @1080p; H.265 playback @720p;
  • Interfaces via 2x 100-pin board-to-board connectors
    • HDMI v1.3a up to 1080p30 and 720p60
    • 4-lane MIPI-DSI up to 1080p30 and 720p60
    • Audio – 1x stereo headphone, 4x line out, 3x microphone inputs; Hi-Fi Audio with 24bit/192Khz playback support HD 5.1 Audio
    • Camera – 2x MIPI CSI: up to 13MP Camera on CSI0 and up to 8MP camera on CSI1
    • I2C, GPIO, UART
    • SDIO 3.0
    • USB 2.0
    • JTAG
  • Power Supply – +3.3V/5A Input
  • Dimensions – 50 x 28 mm
  • Temperature Range –  -30 to 85 Degrees C (Operating)
  • Humidity – 5 to 95% RH non-condensing
  • Certifications – RoHS and WEEE compliant
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The module can be either pre-loaded with Android Lollipop or Ubuntu/Debian Linux, with board support packages (BSP) provided for development. In order to get started as fast as possible, the company also offers a 60×55 mm carrier board for the module with a micro SD slot, HDMI output, USB 2.0 host ports, and headers with I2C, SPI, UART, GPIOs,…

Inforce 6301™ Development Kit

Inforce 6301 Development Kit with ACC-1C10 carrier board and Inforce 6301 micro SoM

Inforce 6301 can be purchased for $85 in single quantity with a 10-year availability commitment, while the development kit goes for $185 with 7-year availability. You’ll find more details including software and hardware documentation in the previous links to the store, as well as an overview on Inforce Computing 6301 SoM page.

UP Squared Apollo Lake Development Board Comes with Up to 8GB RAM, 128 GB Storage for 89 Euros and Up (Crowdfunding)

November 1st, 2016 4 comments

AAEON Introduced a Intel Atom X5 based Raspberry Pi-like development board named “UP Board” last year that sold for as low as 89 Euros via a Kickstarter campaign. The company is now back with the first Apollo Lake development board for makers I’ve seen so far, powered by either a dual core Celeron N3350 or a quad core Pentium N4200 processor, featuring an Altera MAX 10 FPGA, and called UP2 (“UP Squared”).

apollo-lake-development-board

There are six variants of UP Squared board sharing most of the same technical specifications:

  • SoC
    • Intel Celeron N3350 dual core “Apollo Lake” processor @ 1.1 GHz / 2.4 GHz with 12 EU Intel HD graphics 500 @ 200 MHz / 650 MHz (6W TDP)
    • Intel Pentium N4200 quad core “Apollo Lake” processor @ 1.1 GHz / 2.5 GHz with 18 EU Intel HD graphics 505 @ 200 MHz / 750 MHz (6W TDP)
  • FPGA – Altera Max 10 FPGA
  • System Memory –  2, 4 or 8 GB LPDDR4 SDRAM
  • Storage – 16, 32, 64 or 128 GB eMMC flash, 1x SATA 3 port + SATA power
  • Video Output – 2x HDMI 1.4b; eDP connector; 3 independent displays support
  • Audio I/O – HDMI
  • Connectivity – Dual Gigabit Ethernet ports,
  • USB – 3x USB 3.0 ports, 1x USB 3.0 OTG port, header with 2x USB 2.0 ports
  • Camera – 1x 4-lane MIPI CSI connector
  • Expansion
    • 40-pin GP (general purpose) Raspberry Pi compatible header with GPIOs, I2C, SPI, ADC … signals controlled by the Apollo Lake processor (according to the block diagram below)
    • 60-pin EXHAT connector with GPIO, I2C, UART, USB 3.0… signals controlled by Altera FPGA and the Intel processor based on the block diagram.
    • M.2 2230/E-key slot
    • mini PCIe x1 slot
    • Header with 2x HSUART
  • Debugging – JTAG header for FPGA
  • Misc – Power button, 4x LEDs, RTC header, fan power header, reset and power pin headers
  • Power Supply – 5V DC via power barrel
  • Dimensions – 85.6 x 90 mm
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0 to 60 C
  • Certifications – FCC, CE, RoHS

up-squared-boardThe six available boards have only differences in terms of processor, RAM, and storage:

  • UP2 Celeron (89 Euros) – 2 GB LPDDR4, 16 GB eMMC flash
  • UP2 Celeron Plus (105 Euros) – 2 GB LPDDR4, 32 GB eMMC flash
  • UP2 Celeron Ultra (125 Euros) – 4 GB LPDDR4, 32 GB eMMC flash
  • UP2 Pentium (169 Euros) – 4 GB LPDDR4, 32 GB eMMC flash
  • UP2 Pentium Plus (199 Euros) – 8 GB LPDDR4, 64 GB eMMC flash
  • UP2 Pentium Ultra (229 Euros) – 8 GB LPDDR4, 128 GB eMMC flash

up2-block-diagramThe board will support Windows 10, Windows IoT Core, Linux (Ubuntu, Ubilinux Debian, Yocto Project), and Android. UP2 board should also leverage UP board eco-system with support for Intel RealSense for robotics project, LoRa connectivity for IoT gateways, EnOceon solutions for home automation, and TPLink for WiFi, and many more.

UP and UP2 Boards Comparison

UP and UP2 Boards Comparison

UP Squared is larger than UP board, but as seen from the table above offers many more features, and more performance for about the same price.

The project has now launched on Kickstarter, where the company has also surpassed their 10,000 Euros funding target, with pledges currently totaling a little over 22,000 Euros. Most rewards starting with UP Squared Celeron at 89 Euros come with the board only, but you may consider pledge for kits that include the power supply, HDMI cable, SATA cable, USB 2.0 pin header cable, and WiFi 802.11ac and BT 4.2 M.2 module (Starter/Innovator Package). Most rewards are expected to ship on April 2017, excepted Innovator packages with Beta boards reaching backers in February 2017. Shipping is not included, but is only 13 to 16 Euros for Europeans, and between 28 and 46 Euros (Brazil) for the rest of the world. More details include the 40-pin header pinout can be found in UP Squared product page.

Via HackerBoards

NanoPi S2 Quad Core ARM Linux Board Comes with WiFi & BT Connectivity, HDMI, LVDS, and LCD Interfaces

October 28th, 2016 12 comments

FriendlyARM has released a bunch of Allwinner based NanoPi Allwinner boards recently, but they also have some Samsung/Nexcell S5P ARM Cortex A9 boards in their portfolio, and the latest is NanoPi S2 with Samsung S5P4418 quad core processor, three display interfaces, a camera interface, wireless connectivity through WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0, a 40-pin “Raspberry Pi” header, and more.

nanopi-s2

NanoPi S2 specifications:

  • SoC – Samsung/Nexcell S5P4418 quad core Cortex A9 processor @ 400 MHz to 1.4 GHz with Mali-400MP GPU
  • System Memory – 1 GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash  + micro SD slot
  • Video Output / Display I/F – micro HDMI port up to 1080p60, 24-pin LCD RGB interface, 24-pin LVDS interface
  • Audio – 3.5mm audio jack, micro HDMI
  • Camera – 24-pin DVP camera interface
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n WiFi + Bluetooth 4.0 classic & LE (AP6212 module); IPEX/u.FL antenna connector
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Host, 1x micro USB port for data and power
  • Expansion Headers
    • 40-pin Raspberry compatible header with GPIOs, UART, SPI, I2C, PWM, etc..
    • Unpopulated ADC header
  • Debugging – 4-pin serial header
  • Misc – 1x power LED, 1x system LED, 2x user keys, unpopulated RTC header, heatsink mounting holes
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via micro USB port; AXP228 PMU with software shutdown and wake-up functions.
  • Dimensions – 75 x40 mm (8-layer PCB)

The hardware is quite similar to NanoPi 2 board, but it replaces one of the micro SD slot by an eMMC flash, adds an LVDS connector, an audio jack, an ADC header, and mounting holes with an heatsink.

samsung-s5p4418-development-boardSoftware support for NanoPi S2 is basically the same as for NanoPi 2 with Android 5.1 and Debian 8 images provided, both relying on Linux 3.4. You’ll find hardware and software documentation on the Wiki.

NanoPi S2 board sells for $45 plus shipping directly on FriendlyARM website. Bear in mind that it does not sell with an heatsink, and I could find one in the “optional accessories” section (yet). [Update: The company confirmed it works with the heat sink for T2/T3]

Theobroma Systems Introduces Micro Qseven Allwinner A64 System-on-Module

October 25th, 2016 3 comments

Theobroma Systems, an Austrian based engineering services and embedded systems solutions company, has been designing Allwinner based systems-on-module compliant with Micro Qseven standard for a while, starting with Allwinner A31 A31-μQ7 module in 2015. The company has now launched A64-μQ7 system-on-module powered by Allwinner A64 quad core Cortex A53 processor.

allwinner-a64-som

A64-μQ7 module specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner A64 quad core ARM Cortex A53 processor with Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – Up to 2GB DDR3 on module
  • Storage – Up to 64GB eMMC flash, Up to 16MB SPI NOR flash
  • Display I/F (via edge connector) – HDMI 1.4 up to 4K @ 30 Hz, MIPI DSI up to 1920×1200 @ 60 Hz
  • Connectivity – 10/100/1000 Mbps PHY
  • USB – 7x USB 2.0 ports including one dual-role port
  • Other I/Os – On-module communication offload controller for CAN, UART, 8x GPIO, I2S, I2C, SMBus, SPI, FAN
  • Security – Optional Global Platform 2.2.1 compliant JavaCard 2.2 environment, and EAL4-certified smartcard controller
  • Power – 5V; AXP803 PMIC
  • Dimensions – 70mm x 40mm (μQseven form factor)
  • Temperature Range – Commercial: 0ºC to 85ºC; Extended range available on request

The company provides support for Linux 4.x, Debian 8, and Android 6 for the module. There’s no word about a baseboard / carrier board for the SoM, but since it should be mechanically and electrically compatible with previous micro Qseven module (that’s what standards are for), and we do know a Mini-ITX baseboard is available for previous Theobroma modules.

The price has not been disclosed publicly. A few more details may be found on the company’s A64-uQ7 product page.

Thanks to tkaiser for the tip.

RabbitMax Flex IoT & Home Automation Board and Kit for Raspberry Pi

October 7th, 2016 4 comments

RabbitMax Flex is an add-on board for the Raspberry Pi boards with 40-pin headers, namely Raspberry Pi Model A+ and B+, Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 0, destined to be used for Internet of Things (IoT) and home automation applications thanks to 5x I2C headers, a relay, an LCD interface and more.

I’ve received a small kit with RabbitMax Flex boards, a BMP180 temperature & barometric pressure I2C sensor, and a 16×2 LCD display.

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1602a-lcd-display
bmp180-i2c-sensor

RabbitMax Flex specifications:

  • Relay – Songle SRD-05VDC-SL-C supporting 125V/250VAC up to 10A, 30VDC up to 10A
  • Storage – EEPROM with some system information for identification
  • IR – IR LED, IR receiver
  • Misc – Buzzer, Button, RGB LED
  • Expansion
    • Header for LCD character display + potentiometer for backlight adjustment
    • 5x 4-pin headers for I2C sensors
  • Dimensions – Raspberry Pi HAT compliant
Click to Enlarge

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The assembly of the kit is child’s play as you don’t even need tools. First insert the HAT board on top of your Raspberry Pi board, add the LCD display, and whatever I2C sensors you please.

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Click to Enlarge

I’ve done so on my Raspberry Pi 2 board and battery kit. I have not tried the software part yet, but the platform has been tested on Raspbian, with a custom Linux OS built with the Yocto Project coming soon. Currently three sensors are supported including a temperature and barometric pressure sensor (BPM180), a temperature and humidity sensor (HTU21) and a light sensor (BH1750), but you could also connect any other I2C sensors provided you work on the code to enable support.

You’ll find documentation, software, example projects, tools, and soon KiCAD files on RabbitMax github’s account, and some extra info on RabbitMax.com website. RabbitMax Flex board is now sold for $49.90 on Tindie.com, but if you are patient enough, you should be able to buy it for a significantly lower price via an upcoming crowdfunding campaign.