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Posts Tagged ‘mipi’

MIPI I3C Sensor Interface is a Faster, Better, Backward Compatible Update to I2C Protocol

January 11th, 2017 1 comment

I2C (Inter-Integrated Circuit) is one of the most commonly used serial bus for interfacing sensors and other chips, and use two signals (Clock and Data) to control up to 128 chips thanks to its 7-bi address scheme. After announcing it was working of a new I3C standard in 2014, the MIPI Alliance has now formally introduced the MIPI I3C (Improved Inter Integrated Circuit) Standardized Sensor Interface, a backward compatible update to I2C with low power consumption, and higher bitrate allowing it to be used for applications typically relying on SPI too.

mipi-i3cI3C offers four data transfer modes that, on maximum base clock of 12.5MHz, provide a raw bitrate of 12.5 Mbps in the baseline SDR default mode, and 25, 27.5 and 39.5 Mbps, respectively in the HDR modes. After excluding transaction control bytes, the effective data bitrates achieved are 11.1,20, 23.5 and 33.3 Mbps.

MIPI I3C vs I2C Energy Consumption and Bitrate - Click to Enlarge

MIPI I3C vs I2C Energy Consumption and Bitrate – Click to Enlarge

The MIPI Alliance has also provided a tablet comparing I3C, I2C, and SPI features, advantages and disadvantages.

Parameter MIPI I3C I2C SPI
Number of Lines 2-wire 2-wire (plus separate wires for each required interrupt signal) 4-wire (plus separate wires for each required    interrupt signal)
Effective Data Bitrate 33.3 Mbps max at 12.5 MHz
(Typically: 10.6 Mbps at 12 MHz SDR)
3 Mbps max at 3.4 MHz (Hs)
0.8 Mbps max at 1 MHz (Fm+)
0.35 Mbps max at 400 KHz (Fm)
Approx. 60 Mbps max at 60 MHz for conventional implementations (Typically: 10 Mbps at 10 MHz)
 Advantages
  • Only two signal lines
  • Legacy I2C devices co-exist on the same bus (with some limitations)
  • Dynamic addressing and supports
    static addressing for legacy I2C
    devices
  • I2C-like data rate messaging  (SDR)
  • Optional high data rate messaging
    modes (HDR)
  • Multi-drop capability and dynamic
    addressing avoids collisions
  • Multi-master capability
  • In-band Interrupt support
  • Hot-join support
  • A clear master ownership and
    handover mechanism is defined
  • In-band integrated commands
    (CCC) support
  • Only two signal lines
  • Flexible data transmission rates
  • Each device on the bus is
    independently addressable
  • Devices have a simple master/slave relationship
  • Simple implementation
  • Widely adopted in sensor
    applications and beyond
  • Supports multi-master and multi-drop capability features
  • Full duplex communication
  • Push-pull drivers
  • Good signal integrity and high speed below   20MHz (higher speed are challenging)
  • Higher throughput than I2C and SMBus
  • Not limited to 8-bit words
  • Arbitrary choice of message size, content and purpose
  • Simple hardware interfacing
  • Lower power than I2C
  • No arbitration or associated failure modes
  • Slaves use the master’s clock
  • Slaves do not need a unique address
  • Not limited by a standard to any maximum  clock speed (can vary between SPI devices)
 Disadvantages
  • Only 7-bits are available for device addressing
  • Slower than SPI (i.e. 20Mbps)
  • New standard, adoption needs to be proven
  • Limited number of devices on a
    bus to around a dozen devices
  • Only 7-bits (or 10-bits) are available for static device addressing
  • Limited communication speed rates and many devices do not support the higher speeds
  • Slaves can hang the bus; will require
    system restart
  • Slower devices can delay the
    operation of faster speed devices
  • Uses more power than SPI
  • Limited number of devices on a bus
    to around a dozen devices
  • No clear master ownership and
    handover mechanism.
  • Requires separate support signals for
    interrupts
  • Need more pins than I2C/MIPI I3C
  • Need dedicated pin per slave for
    slave select (SS)
  • No in-band addressing
  • No slave hardware flow control
  • No hardware slave acknowledgment
  • Supports only one master device
  • No error-checking protocol is
    defined
  • No formal standard, validating
    conformance is  not possible
  • SPI does not support hot swapping
  • Requires separate support signals
    for interrupts

You’ll find more technical details by downloading MIPI I3C specifications and/or whitepaper (free email registration required). Note that only MIPI member can have access to the complete specifications.

Via Electronics Weekly

Categories: Hardware Tags: i3c, mipi, sensor, standard

Firefly-RK3399 Rockchip RK3399 Development Board Launched on Kickstarter for $139 and Up

December 5th, 2016 27 comments

Firefly-RK3399 is the first, and for now the only one, development board equipped with the latest Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core Cortex A72 & A53 processor. It’s just not available yet, but the board has now been launched on Kickstarter where it is offered for $139 to $199 depending on options.

rk3399-development-board

Firefly-RK3399 board specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core big.LITTLE processor with dual core ARM Cortex A72 up to 2.0 GHz and quad core Cortex A53 processor with ARM Mali-T860 MP4 GPU with OpenGL 1.1 to 3.1 support, OpenVG1.1, OpenCL and DX 11 support
  • System Memory
    • Standard – 2 GB DDR3
    • Plus devkit – 4 GB DDR3
  • Storage
    • Standard – 16 GB eMMC flash, micro SD card, M.2 socket
    • Plus devkit – 32 GB eMMC flash, micro SD card, M.2 socket
  • Video Output & Display Interfaces
    • 1x HDMI 2.0 up to 4K @ 60 Hz
    • 1x DisplayPort (DP) 1.2 interface up to 4K @ 60Hz (via USB type C connector)
    • 1x eDP 1.3 (4-lanes @ 10.8 Gbps)
    • 1x MIPI DSI interface up to 2560×1600 @ 60 Hz
  • Video Decode – 4K VP9 and 10-bit H.265 video codec support up to 60 fps
  • Audio
    • Via HDMI or DisplayPort
    • 3.5mm headphone jack with stereo audio output and mic input
    • optical S/PDIF
    • 1x LINE Out and 1x speaker via GPIO header; Speaker: 1.5W or 2.5 W per channel for respectively 8Ω or 4Ω speakers
    • Built-in microphone
    • I2S output and input interface up to 8 channels
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (RJ45) port using RTL8211E transceiver, WiFi 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO and Bluetooth 4.1 (AP6354 module)
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 port, 1x USB 3.0 type C port
  • Camera
    • 2x MIPI CSI interfaces up to 13MP or 2x 8MP
    • 1x DVP camera interface up to 5MP
  • Debugging – 3-pin serial header
  • Expansion
    • 42-pin GPIO female header with access to 1x I2S, 2x ADC, 2x I2C, 1x SPI, 2x GPIO, 1x LINEOUT, 1x SPEAKER
    • 1x mini PCIe for LTE, 1x PCIe 2.1 M.2 slot B-key (2x PCIe, SATA, USB 2.0, USB 3.0, HSIC, SSIC, Audio, UIM, I2C)
    • SIM card slot
  • Misc – RTC battery header; power & user LEDs; power, reset and recovery buttons; IR receiver
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A DC (5.5×2.1mm barrel connector)
  • Dimensions – 12.4 x 9.3 mm (8-layer PCB)
  • Weight – Board: 89 grams; board + cooling fan and heatsink: 120 grams

The company will provide Android 6.0.1 and Ubuntu 16.04 firmware images for the board, including a dual boot image. There are also work-in-progress documentation and placeholder links to Android SDK and schematics in the product page which will hopefully soon link to the actual documents and files, as well as a work-in-progress Wiki. It may also be worth monitoring the company’s  Github account.

firefly-rk3399-boardThe company aims to raise $50,000 from the crowdfunding campaign, and you’d have to pledge $139 to get “Firefly-RK3399 Development Kit” with 2GB RAM, and 16GB flash together with a 12V/2A power adapter, a USB Type C adapter, a USB to UART serial board, a USB cable, and a a cooling fan (I assume with an heatsink). After the 50 first pieces, the price goes up to $159, and if you want the “Plus development kit” with 4GB RAM and 32GB flash, you’d need to pledge $199 instead. Shipping adds $5 to $30 depending on the destination country, and delivery is planned for March 2017.

NanoPC-T3 Octa-core Cortex A53 Single Board Computer Sells for $60

April 29th, 2016 14 comments

FriendlyARM launched NanoPC-T2 single board computer based on Samsung 5P4418 quad core Cortex A9 processor about 3 months ago, and the company has now an update based on Samsung S5P6818 Octa-Core A53 processor with the exact same interfaces and features including Gigabit Ethernet, WiFI, and Bluetooth, HDMI 1.4a, 30-pin expansion headers, etc…

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

NanoPC-T3 specifications:

  • SoC – Samsung S5P6818 octa core Cortex A53 processor @ up to 1.4GHz with Mali-400MP GPU
  • System Memory – 1 or 2GB 32bit DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash, and 1x SD card slot
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (RTL8211E), 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth LE 4.0 (Ampak AP6212) with on-board chip antenna and IPX antenna connector
  • Video Output / Display I/F- 1x HDMI 1.4a, LVDS, MIPI DSI, parallel RGB LCD
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm audio jack, on-board microphone
  • Camera – 1x DVP interface, 1x MIPI CSI interface
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 type A host ports; 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG port; 2x USB 2.0 host ports via 8-pin header
  • Expansions Headers – 30-pin header for GPIO, 8-pin header for power signals, reset and LED 1-2
  • Debugging – 4-pin header for serial console
  • Misc – Power switch, reset button, 1x power & 2x user LEDs, RTC battery header, boot selection button (SD card / eMMC)
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via power barrel; AXP228 PMIC
  • Dimension – 100 x 60 mm (6-layer PCB)

64-bit_octa-core_ARM-development-boardThe board can run Android and Debian from eMMC flash or SD card like its predecessor, as well as Ubuntu Core with Qt, and software and hardware documentation can be found on the Wiki. The board ships with the heatsink shown in the top picture.

The board can be bought on FriendlyARM website for $60 + shipping via China Post ($10), Fedex ($14) or DHL ($34). Shipping fees in brackets are for my location, so you may get other quotes.

FriendlyARM NanoPC-T2 Board Gets More Storage, WiFi & Bluetooth, Stays Cool, and Costs Less

February 4th, 2016 13 comments

FriendlyARM NanoPC-T1 board powered by Samsung Exynos 4412 processor with 1GB RAM and 4GB eMMC flash was unveiled at the start of 2014 for $69. The company has now announced NanoPC-T2 with Samsung S5P4418 processor with 1GB RAM, and 8GB Flash, as well as WiFi and Bluetooth, as Gigabit Ethernet all of which were missing in the first version. NanoPC-T2 also has a power management chip, and a larger heatsink, meaning that it does not suffer from overheating like NanoPi2 according to FriendlyARM.

NanoPC-T2NanoPC-T2 specifications:

  • SoC – Samsung S5P4418 quad core Cortex A9 processor @ up to 1.4GHz with Mali-400MP GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB 32bit DDR3 RAM
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC flash, and 1x SD card slot (on the bottom of the board)
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth LE 4.0 (Ampak AP6212) with on-board chip antenna and 1x IPX antenna connector
  • Video Output / Display I/F- 1x HDMI 1.4a, LVDS, MIPI DSI, 0.5 mm pitch SMT FPC seat for type-A full-color LCD (RGB: 8-8-8)
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm audio jack, 1x on-board microphone
  • Camera – 1x DVP interface, 1x MIPI CSI interface
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 type A host ports; 1x micro USB 2.0 OTG port; 2x USB 2.0 host port via 8-pin header
  • Expansions Headers – 30-pin header for GPIO, 8-pin header for power signals, reset and LED 1-2
  • Debugging – 4-pin header for serial console
  • Misc – Power switch, 1x power & 2x user LEDs, RTC battery header, boot selection button (SD card / eMMC)
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via power barrel; AXP228 PMIC
  • Dimension – 100 x 60 mm (6-layer PCB)
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The board can run Debian and Android from either anSD card or eMMC flash using the boot selection button. The Wiki page is currently empty, but should eventually have all the technical details needed to get started and more.

NanoPC-T2 board will launch on February 28, 2016 for $59 + shipping on FriendlyARM shop. Individuals based in South and North America will instead be able to purchase it from Andahammer.

HummingBoard Edge SBC Gets an mSATA/M.2 Connector, an eMMC Flash, and More I/Os

August 3rd, 2015 8 comments

SolidRun launched its HummingBoard family last year with a board with a form factor similar to the Raspberry Pi, but instead of using a Broadcom processor, the boards were based on Freescale i.MX6 single, dual or quad core processors. The company has recently introduce a higher end board with Hummingboard Edge that adds an M.2 connector, eMMC flash, 7 to 36V DC power input, more camera interfaces, a DSI interface, and more GPIOs.

HummingBoard_EdgeThe following comparison table shows the differences between the new Hummingboard Edge, and the older HummingBoard Pro and Base boards.

HummingBoard-Edge HummingBoard-Pro HummingBoard-Base
uSOM model i.MX6 based Solo to Quad Core uSOM
Memory Up to 4GB DDR3
Storage uSD, eMMC, M.2/mSATA uSD, mSATA uSD
Connectivity 1x RJ45*, 4x USB 2.0, mPCIE with SIM card holder 1x RJ-45*, 2x USB 2.0 Hosts, 2x USB 2.0 header, mPCIE half-size 1x RJ-45*, 2x USB 2.0 Hosts
Media HDMI-out, LVDS, analog audio, MIPI-CSI-4 and MIPI-DSI, parallel camera (on GPIO header) HDMI-out, LVDS, S/PDIF, analog audio, MIPI-CSI-2 camera HDMI- Out, S/PDIF, MIPI-CSI-2 Camera
Other I/O Reset button, 36 pins GPIO header, RTC with battery, IR Reset Button, 26 pins GPIO Header, RTC, IR Reset Button, 26 pins GPIO Header
Power 7V-36V, 5.5mm in
5V, uUSB
Dimensions 102 x 69mm 85 x 56mm
OS Linux Android, Linux
Environment Metal Enclosure No Enclosure

* Gigabit Ethernet port, but limited to 470 Mbps (i.MX6 design limitation).

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram (Click to Enlarge)

The Edge board however loses the optical S/PDIF port found in the older models, is bigger, and supports Linux, but for some reasons not Android. The full list of supported OS can be found on the download page, although it’s not clearly at this stage which ones will run on HummingBoard Edge. A metal enclosure has also been designed for the board.

HummingBoard_Edge_Metal_EnclosureHummingBoard Edge can be pre-ordered now for $102 to $252 depending on options, with shipping scheduled for the end of August.  $102 will get you the baseboard with MicroSOM i1 module with i.MX6 Solo and 512MB RAM, but no power supply, no enclosure, and no wireless connectivity. The most expensive model will come with MicroSoM i4x4 with i.MX6 Quad, 4GB RAM, a Wi-Fi & Bluetooth Module, a power adapter, an 8GB micro SD card, and the metal enclosure.

Visit HummingBoard product page for more details, and access to full documentation.

Via LinuxGizmos

e-con Systems 13MP MIPI CSI-2 Camera Designed for Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board

April 23rd, 2015 3 comments

e-con Systems has just introduced e-CAM130_CUTK1, a 13 MP MIPI CSI-2 camera board specifically designed for Nvidia Jetson TK1 development board powered by Nvidia Tegra K1 quad core Cortex A15 processor supporting up to Ultra HD (3840×2160) resolution @ 22 fps, or 1080p @ 30+ fps with MJPEG or YUV422 output.

Nvidia_Jetson_TK1_CSI_Camera

e-CAM130_CUTK1 camera board is comprised of a camera module and an adapter board that can be directly plug into Jetson TK1 board. Camera board key features and specifications:

  • Camera Module
    • e-CAM130_CUMI1820_MOD with S-mount lens holder
    • based on Aptina AR1820HS sensor.
    • Max S/N ratio: – 36.3 dB;  Dynamic Range: – 65.8 dB
  • Interface – 4-lane MIPI CSI-2 interface
  • Resolution / Frame rate – VGA @ 90 fps, 720p @ 60 fps, 1080p @ 30 fps, UltraHD (3840×2160) @ 22 fps, 13MP (4224×3156) @ 14 fps. Values are the same for MJPEG or YUV422.
  • Connector – 125-pin connector for Jetson TK1
  • Power requirements – ~ 2.5W
  • Dimensions – 65.27 mm x 55 mm x 27.3 mm
  • Weight – 3.55 grams with lens
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -30° to 70° C; Stable image: 0° to 50° C

 

Tegra_TK1_MIPI_CSI_CameraThe camera supports Linux, with V4L2 camera drivers, and sample application with source code provided. You can find documentation including the datasheet, and a getting started guide for Jetson TK1 in their documentation page. Android drivers are also being worked on. You can watch a demo of the camera in Ubuntu 14.04 with GUVC Viewer (ecam_tk1_guvcview) sample application.

e-CAM130_CUTK1 camera board is available now, but price has not been publicly released. However, for reference e-CAM130_CUMI1820_MOD camera module used in this kit sells for $169 per unit, with the price dropping to $89 for 1k orders.

MIPI Introduces SoundWire Audio Interface for Mobile Devices

October 30th, 2014 1 comment

MIPI (Mobile Industry Processor Interface) Alliance is a non-profit corporation that establishes standards for hardware and software interfaces in mobile devices. MIPI is better known for its MIPI DSI (Display Serial Interface) and CSI (Camera Serial Interface), but as you can see from the diagram below, they’ve been busy publishing a lot more interface specifications. The latest being MIPI SoundWire, a new audio interface for amplifiers, microphones and audio codecs used in smartphones, tablets, mobile PCs and other devices.

Existing MIPI Standards (Click to Enlarge)

Existing MIPI Standards (Click to Enlarge)

The consortium only released a “MIPI SoundWire Specification Brief” so there aren’t that many details. SoundWire is not the first audio interface from MIPI, with SLIMbus having been first introduced in 2007, and later updated in 2013 with SLIMBus 1.1. SLIMbus must not have been that widely used, as only Intrinsyc OPEN-Q 8084 Development Kit appears to feature the interface among all the board listed on CNX Software.

Nevertheless SLIMBus and the new SoudnWire share some of the same specifications:

  • Two-wire (clock and data), 1.2 or 1.8 V, time-division transport
  • Embedded control and data channels to support audio, data and control applications.
  • Support for multiple clocks, including natural audio clocks (24.576, 24, 19.2 MHz)
  • Isochronous and asynchronous modes
  • PCM format

But SoundWire also brings some improvements with support for double data rate, configurable frame size, lower complexity, PDM (Pulse Density Modulation) format, multichannel data, and more…

25 companies have been involved in SoundWire development, products based on MIPI SoundWire are already in development and IP, silicon components and test tools based on the specification are expected to become commercially available also by year-end 2014, or early 2015.

Via Embedded.com

Categories: Audio, Hardware Tags: mipi, standard