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Posts Tagged ‘raspberry pi’

FFmpeg 3.1 adds support for OpenMAX encoding on Raspberry Pi, VA-API H.264 & H.265 Encoding, and more

June 29th, 2016 2 comments

FFmpeg is an open source multimedia framework used by many open source, as well as closed source, projects to handle audio and video containers parsing, hardware or software video decoding / encoding, and more. I also used it a few months ago to test H.265 hardware encoding with an Nvidia GPU using the development branch, but the developers have now released FFmpeg 3.1 “Laplace”, so it’s possible to use a stable release to perform H.265 hardware encoding.

ffmpeg_3.1

Some of the most noticeable features of the new version include:

  • Generic OpenMAX IL H.264 & MPEG4 encoders for Raspberry Pi
  • VA-API accelerated H.264/HEVC/MJPEG encoding
  • VAAPI-accelerated format conversion and scaling
  • Native Android MediaCodec API H.264 decoding
  • CUDA (CUVID) HEVC & H.264 decoders
  • CUDA accelerated format conversion and scaling
  • DXVA2 accelerated HEVC Main10 decoding on Windows
  • Many new muxers/demuxers
  • A variety of new filters

The complete list of changes for FFmpeg 3.1 can be found via the Changelog in Git.

Thanks to Harley for the tip.

Raspberry Pi Zero Based Google’s Project Bloks Aims to Teach Programming to Young Children

June 28th, 2016 No comments

Visual programming development tools such as Scratch or Blockly are now becoming more popular to introduce school children to programming, and Google Research is now working on bringing the software visual programming concept to physical blocks “programming” though Project Bloks targeting younger children who may not be able to write or read yet. It might also help older children grasping programming concepts faster than when programming by typing on a keyboard.

Project_Bloks

Project Bloks is comprised of three main hardware components connected together:

  • Pucks – Those are the buttons, dials, switches, and other inputs from the project. Pucks have no active electronics, and even a piece of paper with some conductive ink could be a Puck.
  • Base Boards –  They read a Puck’s instruction through a capacitive sensor, and forward a Puck’s command to the Brain Board.  Each Base Board is also fitted with a haptic motor & LEDs, and can trigger audio feedback from the Brain Board’s built-in speaker.
  • Brain Board – Built around the Raspberry Pi Zero, and adding WiFi, Bluetooth, and a built-in speaker, the Brain Board take care of all the processing, provides the other boards with power, and sends the Base Board(s) instructions to any device with WiFi or Bluetooth connectivity
Brain Board

Brain Board

Children can then assemble Pucks, a Base Board, and the Brain Board together in various forms and shapes to create projects. Google partnered with IDEO to create Coding Kit reference device to show researchers, teachers, and developers how kids could learn basic concepts of programming.

More information can be found on Project Bloks website.

Via HackerBoards

DIY Wireless Window/Glass Mounted Camera Based on Raspberry Pi Zero Board

June 22nd, 2016 2 comments

A few weeks ago, the Raspberry Pi foundation announced a new version of the Raspberry Pi Zero with a CSI camera connector. Since the solution is quite lightweight, Steven Cassidy had the idea to make a WiFi enabled window camera by soldering a USB WiFi module and fitting the hardware to a plastic part with two suction cups.

Raspberry_Zero_Camera_Suction_CupsOnce the assembly is done, you can stuck the hardware to a window or glass of your choice in your home, car, aquarium, etc…

Pi_Zero_Camera_WindowIf you like the concept but would like to have something working out of the box instead of making your own, the Pi Hut has design ZeroView on the same principle, and which will sell for 7 GBP (~$10.3).

The Eclipse Foundation Releases Open Source Smart Home & IoT Gateway Frameworks, MQTT & oneM2M Implementations

June 17th, 2016 3 comments

The Eclipse Internet of Things (IoT) Working Group has released – or soon will be releasing – four open source projects for the Internet of Things with Eclipse SmartHome 0.8 framework, Eclipse Kura 2.0 IoT gateway framework, Eclipse Paho 1.2 MQTT & MQTT-SN clients, and Eclipse OM2M 1.0 implementation of oneM2M standard.

Eclipse_IoTEclipse SmartHome 0.8

Eclipse SmartHome is a framework for smart home solutions that runs on embedded devices, including Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black or Intel Edison development boards.

The latest SmartHome 0.8 release includes a new REST API and corresponding “Paper UI” administration interface, support for new devices including Sonos speakers, LIFX bulbs, Belkin WeMo devices, digitalSTROM systems, EnOcean devices (via a new OSGi EnOcean Base Driver) and others, as well as a new rule engine supporting templates for beginners, JavaScript for automation rules and graphical rule editors.

You can find more details on Eclipse SmartHome page, and/or download SmartHome 0.8, and optionally SmartHome Designer for Linux, Mac OS X, or Windows.

Eclipse Kura 2.0

Eclipse Kura is a framework for building IoT gateways with the latest Kura 2.0 release to bring a new responsive user interface (UI), support for multiple cloud connections to Eurotech Everyware Cloud, Amazon AWS IoT, Microsoft Azure IoT and IBM IoT Foundation, new tools and code samples to ease the creation of Kura applications, and tighter integration with Apache Camel.

Eclipse Kura 2.0 will be available later in June. You can find more details, including instructions to use it on BeagleBone Black and Raspberry Pi boards on Eclipse Kura page. Kura is also found on commercial M2M and IoT gateways such Eurotech ReliaGATE 15-10.

Eclipse Paho 1.2

Paho MQTT Clients Features Comparison (Click to Enlarge)

Paho MQTT Clients Features Comparison (Click to Enlarge)

Paho provides an open-source client implementations of the MQTT and MQTT-SN messaging protocols in Java, Python, JavaScript, C, .Net, Android and Embedded C/C++ client libraries. Paho 1.2 release adds automatic reconnect & offline buffering functionality for the C, Java and Android Clients, webSocket support for the Java and Python Clients, and a new Go Client for Windows, Mac OS X, Linux and FreeBSD.

Visit Eclipse Paho page for more details about the implementations and to download the latest 1.2 version.

Eclipse OM2M 1.0

Eclipse OM2M is an open source implementation of the oneM2M standard, and the version 1.0 includes the following features:

  • Modular platform architecture, based on OSGi making it highly extensible
  • Lightweight REST API exposed through multiple communication bindings including HTTP and CoAP protocols and supporting various content formats such as XML and JSON.
  • Flexible data storage based on an abstract persistence layer supporting embedded & server databases, in-memory mode, SQL & NoSQL models.
  • Implementation of  Dedicated Common Service Entity (CSE) for Infrastructure node (IN), Middle Node (MN), and Application Service Node (ASN), and Common Service Function (CSF) including: Registration, Application and Service Management, Discovery, Data Management and Repository, Subscription and Notification, Group Management, Security, etc.
oneM2M Functional Architecture with AE (Application Entity), CSE and NSE

oneM2M Functional Architecture with AE (Application Entity), CSE and NSE

Version 1.0 release will be available later this month, you can find out more on Eclipse OM2M page.

The foundation has also issued a proposal for Eclipse Kapua open source project aimed to create a modular integration platform for IoT devices and smart sensors.

You can also check out other open source IoT projects on Eclipse IoT microsite.

Raspberry Pi 3 To Get ARM TrustZone Support with Linaro OP-TEE Port

June 9th, 2016 1 comment

If you ever wanted to experiment with ARM Trustzone, and IoT security, you’ll soon be able to do so with the Raspberry Pi 3 board thanks to a port of Linaro OP-TEE (Open Portable Trusted Environment Execution) by Sequitur Labs.

OP-TEE Architecture

OP-TEE Architecture: optee_client, optee_linuxdriver and optee_os

Broadcom BCM2737 SoC found in Raspberry Pi 3 board already had TrustZone hardware for isolation and protection for sensitive material such as cryptographic keys, algorithms and data, but the upcoming software release will mean the feature can now be used, and it’s free for trial/evaluation, and  education. Trustzone is also used for DRM (digital rights management), but in the case of Raspberry Pi 3 it will most likely used to teach how to secure the Internet of Things (IoT).

The release is scheduled for July 11, with source code and documentation to be available in OP-TEE github account. All you’ll need to get started is a Raspberry Pi 3 board, a micro SD  card to load, a Bus blaster, a custom cable to enable bare metal debugging,  a single firmware image with 64-bit Linux, ARM Trusted Firmware, and OP-TEE image, OpenOCD and the configuration file for the Raspberry Pi 3, as well as some code samples and a quick start guide.

Support for OP-TEE will be provided through forums on Linaro.

You may find a few more details in the press release.

Android TV 6.0 Ported to Raspberry Pi 3 with 2D/3D GPU Acceleration, but no Hardware Video Decoding (Yet)

June 7th, 2016 20 comments

Google might be working on Android or Brillo for Raspberry Pi 3, with a new repository created in AOSP, meaning that, if that’s Android,  you won’t probably get the Google Mobiles Services by default, but those can be side-loaded to get access the the Play Store, Youtube, etc… In the meantime, a group of developer have been working Android 6.0 TV port for Raspberry Pi 3. That’s the same team who worked on previous images for Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi 2 boards using “peyo” port, and that did not have any support for 2D/3D graphics acceleration, nor hardware video decoding.

Raspberry_Pi_3_Android_TVBut they’ve made some improvements for their Android TV 6.0.1 release for Raspberry Pi 3, as 2D/3D GPU acceleration is enabled using the Mesa drivers, and Kodi user interface, game emulators, WelGL in Chrome browser all work relatively well using 1280×720 frame buffer resolution as you can see from the videos uploaded by Geek Till it Hertz and ETA Prime.

The downside is that you’ll need to side-load apps, and that hardware video decoding does not currently works, so 1080p videos won’t play smoothly. This will certainly change once support makes it to AOSP , but in the meantime you should not expect video playback to work very well in that image, but you’ll be better off staying in Linux if video playback is important to you.

Kodi_16.1_Android_Raspberry_PiYou can get the source code on github, download the firmware image (extract it and flash it with dd / Win32DiskImager), and post comment or ask question on the dedicated Google Groups thread.

Via Liliputing.

Enclosure & Battery Kit for Raspberry Pi Boards Sells for $22

May 26th, 2016 33 comments

The easiest solution to power Raspberry Pi boards from batteries is to use a USB power bank, and if you want a neater solution, PiJuice HAT board is quite nice, but for something a little cheaper and available right now, Geekworm’s RPi PowerPack kit could be an interesting option with an acrylic enclosure, a battery board with a 3,800 mAh Lithium battery, a fan, three heatsinks, as well as a micro USB to USB cable.

Raspberry_Pi_3_Battery_Case

Complete kit, Raspberry Pi Board not Included

Key features of RPi PowerPack board:

  • 3,800 mAh Lithium battery good for around 9 hours on the Raspberry Pi 3.
  • Output current – 1.8A
  • Output voltage: 5.1V ± 0.1V
  • USB – 2x USB output port
  • Standard charging current / voltage – 1.0A/5.0V via 1x micro USB port.
  • Misc – On/Off switch (The battery still charges in off position)
Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

The kit with the 3,800 mAh battery is sold for $22.43 on DealExtreme.

Categories: Hardware Tags: battery, raspberry pi

Raspberry Pi 3 Repository Has Been Added to Android Open Source Project

May 25th, 2016 4 comments

Android has been ported to the Raspberry Pi boards in the past, but the images were not really usable because the implementation lacked 2D & 3D graphics support. The good news is that Raspberry Pi 3 is likely to officially support the latest version of Android soon, because rpi3 repository has been created in AOSP about 5 weeks ago.

Raspberry_Pi_3_Android_Source_CodeThat’s all we know for now. Raspberry Pi 3 could then be part of the second wave of boards officially supported in Android “mainline”, as currently 96Boards Hikey is the only supported board in AOSP. However, If we go down in the git repo to android/device, we can also see MIPS Creator CI40, Aaeon Upboard, i.mx6ul picoimx board, Intel Edison and Minnowboard, and a few others. Some of the boards will run Brillo instead of Android however, or it could be a different project, so we’ll have to see what happens with RPi3.

Via AndroidPolice and Nanik.