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Posts Tagged ‘ubuntu’

Gigabyte MP30-AR0 is an ARM Server Motherboard Powered by Applied Micro X-Gene 1 SoC

March 27th, 2015 13 comments

So far, it’s been pretty hard to buy ARM server motherboards for individuals, as most, if not all, products were reserved to corporate entities, but with Gigabyte MP30-AR0 server motherboard featuring the first generation Applied Micro X-Gene 64-bit ARM processor this might be about to change. [Update: As mentioned in comments I was probably wrong here, since the motherboard is listed on the Gigabyte’s B2B website, and not its B2C website].

MP30-AR0MP30-AR0 specifications:

  • Processor – AppliedMicro X-Gene 1 processor with 8 ARMv8 cores up to 2.4GHz (TDP 45W)
  • System Memory – 8 x DIMM slots, Single, dual rank UDIMM modules @ 1333/1600 NHz supported (up to 16GB)
  • Storage – 4x SATA III 6Gb/s ports + 1x SD card slot
  • Connectivity – 2x 10GbE SFP+ LAN ports (integrated), 2x GbE LAN ports (Marvell 88E1512), 1x 10/100/1000 management LAN
  • Graphics – Video Integrated in Aspeed AST2400. 2D Video Graphic Adapter with PCIe bus interface up to 1920×1200@60Hz 32bpp.
  • Expansion Slots – 2x PCIe x16 (Gen3 x8 bus) slots
  • Other Internal I/O
    • 1 x CPU fan header
    • 4x system fan headers
    • 1x USB 2.0 header
    • 2x Front panel headers
    • 1x APM strap header
    • 1x HDD back plane board header
    • 1x PMBUS header
    • 1x BMC JTAG header, 1x JTAG PLD header
    • 1x BIOS_H header
    • 1x Chassis intrusion header
    • 1x SATA DOM jumper, 1x BIOS recovery jumper, 1x ACK selection jumper
    • 1x IPMB connector
  • Rear I/Os
    • 2x USB 2.0, 1x Mini USB
    • 1x VGA
    • 1x Serial
    • 2x SFP+, 3x RJ45
    • 1x ID button with LED, 1x Power button with LED, 1x Status LED
  • Power – 1x 24-pin ATX main power connector; 2x 4-pin ATX 12V power connectors
  • Dimensions –  244 × 244 mm (microATX form factor)
MP30-AR0 Motherboard (Click to Enlarge)

MP30-AR0 Motherboard (Click to Enlarge)

The motherboard supports Ubuntu 14.04, and can also be configured with Avocent MergePoint IPMI 2.0 web interface.

Pricing information is still to be announced according to the motherboard page, and the company also integrated it into R120-P30 single socket 1U rackmount server with a 350W PSU and support for 4 hard drives.

Via Tom Cubie

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Linaro 15.03 Release with Linux 4.0 and Android 5.1

March 27th, 2015 No comments

Linaro has just announced their 15.03 release with Linux 4.0-rc4 (baseline), Linux 3.10.72 and 3.14.36 (LSK), and Android 5.1.

The organization has worked on hardware platforms from members namely Qualcomm, ARM, HiSilicon, Samsung, and STMicro, including the recently announced 96Boards boards, and other ARMv8 platforms.

Highlights of the release:

  • Linux Linaro 4.0-rc4-2015.03
    • updated linaro-android topic
    • added a few build/boot fixes for Arndale (llct-misc-fixes topic)
    • GATOR topic: version 5.20.1
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (ifc6410 board support)
    • simple EEPROM framework (via Qualcomm LT’s topic)
    • updated topic from HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • rebased “ILP32 patch set v3″ onto 4.0-rc2
  • Linaro builds of AOSP 15.03
    • updated all the baselines to AOSP 5.1
    • added commit based trigger feature to CI builds
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.03
    • integrated Linaro GCC 4.9-2015.03
    • dismantled meta-aarch64 layer
    • created meta-ilp32 layer
    • cleaned out meta-bigendian layer
    • synced overlayed recipes with upstream
    • added full wget and rt-test on LAMP image as requested by QA team
    • update busybox xargs config as requested by QA team
    • integrated ODP 1.0
    • upstreaming:
      • sysprof: fix arm big-endian build
      • bitbake.conf: use http:// for GNU_MIRROR instead of ftp://
      • kexec-tools: fix build failure on aarch64_be architecture
      • busybox: update to 1.23.1 release
      • mozjs 17.0.0: fix aarch64 and 64k page builds, generic cleanups
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.03
    • added packages: ti-calibrator
    • updated packages: LSK 3.10.72/3.14.36 and linux-linaro 4.0-rc4 kernels
    • Added ILP32 support for ARM64 to Linaro engineering builds
    • Dismantled meta-aarch64 in favour of OE-core aarch64 support
    • CI bring up: luvOS (Linux UEFI Validation Operating System)
  • KVM – support testing arm32 with arm64
  • Added b2120stxh410 to linux-mainline and linux-arm-soc-for-next build jobs
  • 96boards: enable Xorg by default in eMMC/SD debian build
  • Added 2 new build slaves
  • Migrated lt-qcom-ubuntu-images to docker based infrastructure
  • Upgraded ARMv8 build slaves to 3.19 kernel
  • Cleaned up LCR (Linaro Confectionery Release) information and instructions

Visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1503/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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How to Install Ubuntu 14.04 on Acer Aspire E5 Laptop

March 23rd, 2015 No comments

I’ve been owning an Acer Aspire One D255E netbook with a 10″ display, an Intel Atom N455 processor and 1GB RAM that served me well during my travels, but as I’ve become older and less patient, I felt I needed to upgrade it. I planned to spend around 10,000 Baht (~$300), wanted a 14″ display, one of the low power CPU such as Intel Bay Trail-M or AMD Mullins / Beema processors, at least 500GB storage, 4GB RAM, and the ability to install Ubuntu. Finally, after going through several products at my local shop, I had to chose between Acer Aspire E5-411-P3CL with a 7.5W TDP Intel Atom N3540 and Acer Aspire E5-421G-45L0 with a 15W TDP AMD A4-6210 processor that both sell for 11,900 Baht ($365). Despite my preference for processor with lower TDP, I still went with the AMD system, since the performance is a little better, the warranty is good for 2-years (vs. 1 year for the Intel laptop), and I’ve always rooted for AMD in the past as an alternative to Intel.

Both laptop are pre-loaded with Linpus Linux 9.2, but when I boot the laptop at the shop, I discovered it was just a headless version that boots to the command line. The seller even told me something like “oohhh, Linux is like that? I did not know, normally just just format the hard drive…” So it’s like FreeDOS it’s installed to test hardware during MP, and let the shop sell legal system so that customers can install Windows themselves. Sometimes you also get given a free coupon to get it installed in a small shop.

Acer_Linpus_LinuxNevertheless, I finally purchased the laptop and planed to install Ubuntu on the system.

Since I had already downloaded Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit ISO, that’s the one I installed, but once Ubuntu 15.04 is released, you would probably avoid several of the issue I had during installation. You are likely to face issues with Ubuntu 14.10 too.

I followed the standard installation procedure, by “flashing” ubuntu-14.04-desktop-amd64.iso to a USB flash drive formatted with FAT32 using Unetbootin software in another Ubuntu machine, but you could also use a Windows machine with Rufus.

Then I inserted the USB flash into the Aspire E5 laptop, press F2 at boot time to enter InsydeH20 Setup Utility, and select the USB drive as primary boot device, and Ubuntu setup started normally, but the touchpad did not work, so you’ll have to connect a USB mouse unless you’re comfortable with using the keyboard for everything. The touchpad probblem is a known issues, that’s fixed in Linux 3.17 or greater+.

Ubuntu_Acer_Aspire_E5_Installation_Type_Replacing_LinpusApart from this issue the installation went smoothly, and I selected “Replace Linpus Linux 9.2 with Ubuntu” option. The laptop is usually with Ubuntu 14.04 as it is as long you don’t use the not-so-convenient-anyway touchpad, don’t need to use the HDMI and VGA port, and accept some slow animation from time to time.

The latter appears to be due to AMD/ATI open source graphics drivers, so I went to “Additional Drivers” and clicked on “Using Video driver for the AMD graphics accelerators from fglrx-updates (proprietary)”, and after installation the system appeared o run a bit smoother.

AMD_graphics_accelerators_from_fglrx-updatesAlbeit an extra /dev/sda3 partition appeared to have been created for swap, it was not mounted in Ubuntu, so I installed and ran Gparted to check it out, and formatted the partition to linux-swap there. And completely by modifying /etc/fstab with the line:

/dev/sda3 none            swap    sw              0       0

Since it’s not always convenient to connect a USB mouse to the laptop, I also decided to upgrade the kernel, as I explained in my “build a kernel module in Ubuntu” post. I started with Linux kernel 3.19.2, as it was the latest stable kernel at the time, but unfortunately Unity would not start anymore. So I booted again to Linux 3.13.xx installed by default in Ubuntu 14.04 and changed the graphics drivers back to the open source one, and that did the trick, with the touchpad working, but the display seemed to be using the wrong resolution, and although HDMI output worked the lower part was garbled.

Acer_Aspire_E5-421G_HDMI_Issue_640pxSo instead I installed graphics drivers downloaded directly from AMD website, and Unity would not run with either Linux versions installed.

Finally I found that Linux 3.18.9 with fglrx-updates graphics drivers work best for me. That’s how I installed that version of Linux.

cd /tmp
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-headers-3.18.9-031809-generic_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_amd64.deb
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-image-3.18.9-031809-generic_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_amd64.deb
wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.18.9-vivid/linux-headers-3.18.9-031809_3.18.9-031809.201503080036_all.deb
sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-3.18*.deb linux-image-3.18*.deb

Finally Acer Aspire E5-421G laptop runs fairly well with Ubuntu 14.04 with the following working just fine:

  • 1366×768 display
  • VGA and HDMI output (with caveats, see known issues)
  • USB 2.0 ports
  • USB 3.0 port (USB 3.0 hard drive tested with 103 MB/s read speed)
  • Ethernet and Wi-Fi
  • Touchpad
  • Webcam, speakers, and audio jack
  • DVD drive and SD Card reader

However, there are still some known issues:

  • Only mirroring mode works with HDMI and VGA output (no extended display), and HDMI/VGA might be unstable.
  • It’s not possible to enable three displays (Screen + HDMI + VGA) simultaneously, I could only manage two displays at once.
  • Ubuntu will always start with the screen’s brightness set to the lowest setting.
  • Battery only lasts about 3h30 on a full charge. (not fully sure it if it an issue, or is to be expected)

If you plan to use AMD-V virtualization extension, for example for 64-bit OS in Virtualbox, you’ll need to hack UEFI settings since the option to enable it is not available by default.  Anyway, I’ve now come to a point where Ubuntu 14.04 is perfectly usable on Acer Aspire E5, although I would not have complained if the whole installation process would have been easier…

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Orange Pi 2 Allwinner H3 Quad Core Development Board Sells for $35

March 21st, 2015 25 comments

After Orange Pi Plus development board powered by Allwinner H3 quad core cortex A7 processor, the company has decided to launch a lower cost version of their Allwinner H3 board with Orange Pi 2, that has started selling for a compelling $35 + about $4 shipping worldwide, and provides another sub-$50 alternative to Raspberry Pi 2, ODROID-C1, and Radxa Rock Lite boards.

Orange Pi 2 (Click to Enlarge)

Orange Pi 2 (Click to Enlarge)

Orange Pi 2 board specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner H3 quad core Cortex A7 @ 1.6 GHz with 256KB L1 cache, 1MB L2 cache, and an ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU up to 600 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – micro SD card slot (up to 64GB)
  • Video Output – HDMI, AV port
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, AV port, on-board microphone
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet, 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi (Realtek module)
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI Interface
  • Expansions – 40-pin Raspberry Pi Model A+/B+ (mostly) compatible header with 28 GPIOs, UART, I2C, SPI, PWM, CAN, I2S, SPDIF, LRADC, ADC, LINE-IN, FM-IN, and HP-IN
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART header for serial console
  • Misc – IR receiver; Power, reset, and u-boot buttons; Power and Ethernet LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A via barrel jack (micro USB OTG cannot be used to power the board).
  • Dimensions – 93 x 60 mm
  • Weight – 46 grams

Orange_Pi_2_BottomThe cost savings compared to the $59 Orange Pi Plus have been achieved by removing the 8GB eMMC flash and SATA port, replacing Gigabit Ethernet by Fast Ethernet, and reducing the board dimensions. Allwinner H3 has the same ARM Cortex A7 cores as found as in BCM2836 processor used by Raspberry Pi 2, but if H3 is indeed clocked at 1.6GHz, Orange Pi 2 should be nearly 80% faster than RPi 2 when it comes to integer and floating-point performance. It also features a built-in Wi-Fi module that is lacking on both ODROID-C1 and RPi 2, so from an hardware prespective it’s certainly very good value for money. On the software front, the board runs Android 4.4.2, and Lubuntu, Debian and Raspbian images are being worked on, but I can’t find any Allwinner H3 images in the Download section of Orange Pi website, so I’m not sure how you are supposed to boot the board… I’d also expect a much lower level of support compared the Raspberry Pi, ODROID or even Radxa communities, so if you have a problem you might be mostly on your own.

Update: There’s also a version without Wi-Fi called Orange Pi mini 2 that sells for $33.99 including shipping.

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Cloudsto Embed+ RK3288 is a Rockchip RK3288 Board for Digital Signage and Point-of-Sale Applications

March 20th, 2015 No comments

As Rikomagic launched their MK80LE (Linux Edition) mini PCs on Cloudsto a few days ago, I also noticed a new page entitled embed+ RK3288, which described what should be the first board sold by Rikomagic/Cloudsto. The Rockchip RK3288 based board can be used as an Android & Linux development board, but it appears to mainly target OEMs for applications such as digital signage, point-if-sale, and web kiosks.

embed+_rk3288_boardRikomagic embed+ RK3288 specs:

  • SoC – Rockchip 3288 quad core ARM Cortex A17 up to 1.8 GHz with Mali-T764 GPU supporting OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, and OpenCL 1.1
  • System Memory – 2G DDR3
  • Storage – 8 to 32 GB eMMC flash. The daughterboard adds an SD card slot.
  • Video / Display interfaces – HDMI 2.0, LCD interfaces (backlit, power, data)
  • Audio Output – HDMI, 3.5mm earphone / audio output jack, and built-in microphone.
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi , and Bluetooth 4.0 (external). Gigabit LAN via a daughterboard.
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x mini USB OTG. 2 extra USB ports via a daughterboard.
  • Expansion Headers – 11 headers for connection to daughter board, display and others.
  • Misc – RTC + battery slot, RS232, power and reset function.
  • Power Supply – TBC
  • Dimensions – 118 x 83 mm
embed+ RK328 Board and Daughterboard

embed+ RK328 Board and Daughterboard

A daughterboard and 11.6″ to 65″ IPS display (1366×768 to 4K resolutions) can also be provided. The daughterboard includes an SD card slot  (up to 32GB), 2x USB 2.0 host port, and Gigabit LAN.

Embed+ RK3288 kit supports Android 4.4 or Linux (Ubuntu). People interested in this platform can contact Cloudsto for pricing and availability information, since these will depends on the project’s requirements such as eMMC size and display used.

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TechNexion Introduces Intel Edison Compatible PICO-iMX6 SoM and DWARF Board

March 16th, 2015 No comments

Intel Edison is a board made for wearables featuring an SoC with Intel Atom and Quark CPU cores. TechNexion, an embedded systems company based in Taiwan, has decided to make a mechanically and electrically compatible system-on-module featuring Frescale i.MX6 Solo or Duallite ARM Cortex A9 processor called PICO-iMX6. The company is also providing a PICO-DWARF baseboard that’s both compatible with PICO-iMX6 SoM and Edison board. DWARF stands for “Drones, Wearables, Appliances, Robotics and Fun”, so that pretty much explains what the platform is for.

PICO-iMX6 System-on-Module

PICO-iMX6-SD Module (Click to Enlarge)

PICO-iMX6-SD Module (Click to Enlarge)

Two version of the modules are available: PICO-iMX6-SD and PICO-iMX6-EMMC, the former with a micro SD slot for storage, and the latter a 4GB eMMC. Both share the followings specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX6 Solo / Duallite  single/dual core ARM Cortex A9 @ 1Ghz with Vivante GC880 3D GPU and Vivante GC320 2D GPU (Composition)
  • System Memory – 512MB or 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – PICO-iMX6-SD: micro SD slot;  PICO-iMX6-EMMC: 4GB eMMC
  • Connectivity
    • Gigabit Network RGMII Signals routed to board-to-board connector
    • Broadcom BCM4335 802.11ac Wi-Fi
    • Broadcom BCM4336 Bluetooth  4.0
  • Connectors – 1x Intel Edison compatible connector (Hirose 70-pin); 2x Hirose 70-pin connectors
  • I/O Interface Signaling
    • Edison I/O @ 1.8V
      • 9x GPIO
      • 4x PWM
      • 2x I²C, 1x SPI, 2x UART
      • 1x I²S
      • USB-OTG
      • SDIO (4-bit)
    • Additional I/O @ 3.3V
      • Display I/F – Single Channel LVDS; 24-bit TTL RGB; HDMI 1.4; MIPI DSI Display
      • Camera – MIPI CSI Camera
      • PCIe
      • RGMII (gigabit LAN)
      • CAN
  • Video – Decode: 1080p30 + D1; Encode: 1080p30 H.264 BP / Dual 720p
  • Power Supply  – 3.3 ~ 4.5 VDC input
  • Dimensions – 36 x 40 mm
  • Weight – 8 grams
  • Temperature Range – Commercial : 0° to 60° C; Extended : -20° to 70° C; Industrial : -40° to 85° C (no WiFi possible)
  • Relative Humidity – 10 – 90%
  • Certification – CE, FCC, RoHS, REACh

PICO-iMX6_Block_DiagramIntel Edison board measures 36x25mm, so PICO-iMX6 module is a little bigger, and it might not always be 100% compatible depending on your application’s mechanical requirements. Edison Board comes with 1GB RAM, 4GB eMMC, and features a similar Broadcom BCM43340 wireless module. Beside the 70-pin “Edison compatible” connector, TechNexion SoMs also add two hirose connectors for additional signals.

The company can provide BSP for Linux 3.x, Yocto, Android 4.3, Android 4.4, Android 5.0, and Ubuntu. These are not available for download yet, but you should eventually be able to get the necessary files via the Download Center.

PICO-DWARF Carrier Board

If you think PICO-DWARF baseboard looks familiar, it’s because it’s heavily inspired from Wandboard development board, replacing RS-232 DB9 connector by a MIPI connector, removing optical S/PDIF, and a few other modifications.

PICO-DWARF (Left) vs Wandbaord (Right)

PICO-DWARF (Left) vs Wandbaord (Right)

While on the other side of the board, the larger EDM module, as been replaced with the tiny PICO-IMX6 SoM.

PICO-DWARF specifications are listed as follows:

Bottom of PICO-DWARF Board

Bottom of PICO-DWARF Board

  • Supported System-on-Module
    • Intel Edison connector (1x 70-pin Hirose Connector)
    • TechNexion Pico connectors (3x 70-pin Hirose Connector)
  • External Storage – 1x SATA data + power connector, 1x micro SD slot
  • Connectivity – Gigabit LAN (Atheros AR8031) with RJ45 connector
  • Video Output / Display
    • HDMI
    • Single Channel LVDS (expansion header)
    • 24-bit TTL RGB (expansion header)
    • MIPI DSI Display on 33-pin FPC Connector
  • Camera – MIPI CSI signals on 33-pin FPC connector
  • Audio – Freescale SGTL5000 audio codec; Three 3.5 mm jacks for stereo audio in, stereo audio out, and microphone
  • Sensors – Altimeter (Freescale MPL3115A2), 3D Accelerometer (Freescale FXOS8700CQ), Gyroscope (Freescale FXAS21002)
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Host connector,  1x USB 2.0 OTG connector
  • Expansion Headers with access to signaling for single Channel LVDS,  24-bit TTL RGB, PCIe, CAN, GPIO, PWM, I²C, SPI, and UART
  • Misc – RTC DS1337+ with backup battery
  • Power
    • 5V DC +/- 5% via 5.5 / 2.1mm barrel jack
    • LiPo Battery with Freescale MC32BC3770CSR2 based battery charging circuit; 2-pin header for battery
  • Temperature – Commercial : 0° to 60° C
  • Relative Humidity – 10 – 90%
  • Dimensions – 95 x 95 mm
  • Weight – 40 grams
  • Certification – CE, FCC, RoHS, REACh directives
Block Diagram for the DWARF Platform (Click to Enlarge)

Block Diagram for the DWARF Platform (Click to Enlarge)

Please note that SATA won’t be supported by i.MX6 Solo or Duallite processor, so this would only work on future modules featuring Freescale i.MX6 Dual or Quad processor. PICO-DWARF carrier board will be open source hardware, as the company plans to release the schematics, design files, board files and bills of material for the board, just as they’ve done for their previous products.

PICO-DWARF baseboard and PICO-IMX6 modules are expected to start shipping in May and June, with the baseboard and PICO-IMX6-SD first, shortly followed by PICO-MX6-eMMC modules, and a quad core version. PICO-iMX6-SD with Freescale i.MX6 Solo will sell for about $50, while kits based on PICO-iMX6 SoM and PICO-DWARF carrier board will go for $130 to $150 depending on configuration. Further details can be found on TechNexion’s PICO page.

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Rikomagic MK80LE (Linux Edition) Octa-core Ubuntu mini PC

March 15th, 2015 22 comments

Allwinner A80 based Rikomagic MK80 Android TV box, now has a Linux sibling with Rikomagic MK80LE (Linux Edition) running Ubuntu 14.04, and allegedly supports 2D/3D graphics acceleration, and hardware video decoding. Two versions are available MK80LE with 2GB RAM & 16GB Flash, and MK80LE Plus with 4GB RAM & 32GB flash.

Rikomagic_MK80LEThe hardware specs are the same as the Android versions (and Tronsmart Draco AW80 Meta / Telos):

  • SoC – AllWinner Ultra Core A80 4x Cortex 15 @ 2016 MHz, 4x Cortex A7  @ 1320 MHz big.LITTLE processor with Imagination Technologies PowerVR GC6230 GPU with support for OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0/3.0, Directx 9.3
  • System Memory – 2GB (MK80LE), or 4GB (MK80LE Plus) RAM
  • Storage – 16 GB (MK80LE) or 32GB (MK80LE Plus) eMMC, external SATA port (via a USB 2.0 bridge), and micro SD slot up to 64GB
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 + AV port
  • Audio Output – HDMI, AV and optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, dual band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac with external antenna (AP6335), and Bluetooth 4.0.
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 ports.
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A
  • Dimensions – N/A

The device ships with an HDMI Cable, a SATA cable, a USB Cable, a power adapter, a remote control, and a user’s manual. The company has filmed a video showcasing hardware video decode @ 1080p with VLC (VideoLAN), which appears to work pretty well.

The platform also supports 4K in theory, but I guess it might not be implemented yet in their Ubuntu firmware, or they would have shown the capabilities. I’m not sure Kodi 14 supports hardware acceleration either with this setup, but it’s still good to see it working, at least with VLC.

Both media players can be purchased on CloudSto for respectively for £124.99 (~$184 US) for MK80LE, and £154.99 (~$229) for MK80LE Plus including worldwide shipping by DHL. The Linux versions cost £10 (~$15) more compared to the Android ones, and although you could install Ubuntu yourself, Rikomagic Ubuntu version adds video hardware decoding, and is likely to include Exagear software to let you run x86 applications. However, you might be better off purchasing a low cost Intel Bay Trail-D or Bay Trail-M mini PC instead, as it should support all these features out of the box, and be as powerful if not more.

Via Liliputing

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Radxa Rock Lite Board Price Drops to $39

March 13th, 2015 12 comments

When the new Radxa Rock Lite was announced for $59 in September 2014, it was one of the most inexpensive quad core ARM Linux development board available on the market. But ODROID-C1 board in December 2014, and especially Raspberry Pi 2 board in February 2015 changed all that, as these two quad core boards sell for $35 before shipping and taxes. So the company has now decided to drop the price to $39 for the Radxa Rock Lite board.

Radxa Rock Lite (2014)

Radxa Rock Lite (2014)

Let’s remind us of Radxa Rock Lite specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3188 ARM Cortex-A9 quad core @ 1.6Ghz + Mali-400 MP4 GPU
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3 @ 800Mhz
  • Storage – micro-SD SDXC up to 128GB
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 up to 1080p@60hz, and AV output. LVDS interface.
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet port, WiFi 150Mbps 802.11b/g/n with antenna
  • Audio I/O – Audio S/PDIF, headphone jack
  • Camera – CSI interface
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host port, micro USB OTG
  • Debugging – Serial Console
  • Misc – IR sensor, power key, recovery key, reset key, 3 LEDs, RTC
  • Expansions Header – 80-pins including GPIO, I2C, SPI, Line in, USB 2.0, PWM, ADC, LCD, GPS… etc

The board can run various Linux based operating systems like Android 4.4, Ubuntu, Debian, and so on. 3D graphics acceleration should be supported in the desktop OSes, but video decoding has to rely on software decode, except in Android. The quad core Cortex A9 processor @ 1.6GHz will have much better performance than Broadcom BCM2836 quad core Cortex A7 (900 MHz) found in R-Pi 2, and even the Amlogic S805 quad core Cortex A5 (1.5GHz) found in ODROID-C1 that about 40% faster than R-Pi2. Rockchip RK3188 can deliver 16000 DMIPS, against 9420 DMIPS for Amlogic S805, and 6840 DMIPS for Broadcom BCM2836. So if your application require high integer or floating point performance, and/or Wi-Fi (built-in) / RTC or LVDS, Radxa Rock Lite might be a better deal. Bear in mind that the community should be quite smaller than for the other two boards.

Thanks to Freire for the tip.

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