Archive

Posts Tagged ‘ubuntu’

Variscite DART-MX6 is a Tiny SoM with Freescale i.MX6 SoC, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

April 26th, 2015 No comments

Variscite has unveiled what they claim to be the world’s smallest i.MX6 SoM with DART-MX6, a 50x20mm system-on-module featuring Freescale i.MX6 dual or quad processor, up to 1GB RAM, up to 32GB eMMC flash, as well as a wireless module for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Other small i.MX6 modules include TechNexion PICO-iMX6, or SolidRun microSoM found in Hummingbird board, and DART-MX6 has indeed the smallest area among the three.

DART-MX6DART-MX6 specifications:

  • SoC- Freescale i.MX6 dual or quad core Cortex A9 processor up to 800 MHz with Vivante GC2000 3D GPU
  • System Memory –  512 to 1024 MB LPDDR2 (PoP)
  • Storage – 4 to 32GB eMMC flash, 4KB I2C EEPROM
  • Connectivity – Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n + MIMO, Bluetooth 4.0  BLE (TI WL183xMOD WiLink)
  • Audio Codec – Texas Instruments TLV320AIC3106
  • Interfaces and I/Os via 2x 80-pin and 1x 50-pin board to board connectors
    • Camera Interfaces – 1x CSI, 2x CPI
    • Display – HDMI v1.4 up to 1920 x 1080;  Dual 24-bit LVDS up to 1920 x 1200;  24-bit DSI up to 1920 x 1200
    • Connectivity – 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet RGMII
    • Audio –  Headphone driver, digital microphone,  S/PDIF,  Line In/Out
    • Storage – 1x SD / MMC
    • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Host port , 1x USB OTG port
    • 4x UART up to 3.6 Mbps, 2x I2C, 2x SPI
    • 2x CAN bus
    • PWM
    • JTAG
    • RTC on carrier board
    • PCI-Express Gen 2.0
  • Power supply – 3.7 V DC input; Digital I/O voltage 3.3 V
  • Dimensions – 50 mm x 20 mm x 4.0 mm
  • Temperature range – Commercial (0 to 70°C), Extended (-20 to 70°C), or Industrial(-40 to 85°C)
Block diagram for DART-MX6 Module (Click to Enlarge)

Block diagram for DART-MX6 Module (Click to Enlarge)

The company provides support for the Yocto Project (Daisy with Linux 3.10.x), Ubuntu, and Android 4.4, and documentation and source can be found on DART-MX6 wiki with most links pointing to resources for their VAR-SOM-MX6 module so both are likely to be software compatible.

For evaluation and to speed early development, a development kit called VAR-DVK-DT6 can be used. It is composed of VAR-DT6CustonBoard baseboard populated with DART-MX6, a 7″ LCD display with capacitive touch, and relevant cables and accessories, as well as documentation and design package.

VAR-DT6CustomBoard baseboard with DART-MX6 SoM

VAR-DT6CustomBoard baseboard with DART-MX6 SoM

The baseboard has the following key features:

  • Video / Display – HDMI 1.4 connector, 3-pair 18-bit / 4-pair 24-bit LVDS connector + 6-pin FFC/FPC connector for capacitive touch
  • Audio – 3.5 mm jacks for headphone and Line IN, on-board digital microphone
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet (RJ45)
  • Storage – micro SD card slot
  • Camera – Serial/MIPI CMOS sensor interface
  • USB – 1x USB host port, 1x USB OTG port
  • Expansion Connectors:
    • 1x PCI express
    • Serial ports – RS232 header, micro USB debug port, 1x CAN bus
    • SPI, I2C
    • UART, PWM, CLK02, DMIC
  • Debugging – JTAG interface
  • Misc – RTC with CR1225 coincell battery, 5 buttons, one boot select switch
  • Power Supply – 5V (power barrel)
  • Dimensions – 11.8 x 8.7 x 2 cm

According to the press release, DART-MX6 and the development kit are available now, but pricing information has not been released publicly. You can request a quote and find documentation only Variscite DART-MX6 SoM and VAR-DT6Customboard pages.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

Ubuntu 15.04 Released for PCs, Servers, IoT Gateways, the Cloud, and Phones

April 24th, 2015 2 comments

The road to convergence is a long one, and although you still can’t really use a smartphone as both a phone and your desktop computers, Ubuntu 15.04 “Vivid Vervet” releases brings us closer to this goal, as the Linux based operating systems now supports not only the traditional PCs and servers, but also the Cloud and IoT platforms thanks to Ubuntu Snappy, and phones such as BQ Aquarius E4.5 Ubuntu Edition.

Ubuntu_15.04Most changes for Desktop users are under the hood with Upstart replaced by systemd, the Linux kernel is now up to version 3.19, and many packages have been upgraded to a newer version. You can download i386 (32-bit x86) and amd64 (64-bit x86) desktop or server ISO images, and for the first time Ubuntu Snappy for generic amd64 platform, as well as an ARMHF image made for BeagleBone Black, which AFAIK is the very first time Ubuntu formally releases an image for an ARM based device. Ubuntu 15.04 for BQ Aquarius is not available for download directly from Ubuntu website, but the smartphone will soon receive an OTA update.

Developers will also find out that “Ubuntu Developer Tools Center” have gone through various changes, and has now been renamed to Ubuntu Make. Ubuntu 15.04 might also be the last version where we’ll use apt-get and .deb packages, as Ubuntu developers have announced the switch to Snappy (personal) package manager in the development branch of Ubuntu 15.10.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

e-con Systems 13MP MIPI CSI-2 Camera Designed for Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board

April 23rd, 2015 No comments

e-con Systems has just introduced e-CAM130_CUTK1, a 13 MP MIPI CSI-2 camera board specifically designed for Nvidia Jetson TK1 development board powered by Nvidia Tegra K1 quad core Cortex A15 processor supporting up to Ultra HD (3840×2160) resolution @ 22 fps, or 1080p @ 30+ fps with MJPEG or YUV422 output.

Nvidia_Jetson_TK1_CSI_Camera

e-CAM130_CUTK1 camera board is comprised of a camera module and an adapter board that can be directly plug into Jetson TK1 board. Camera board key features and specifications:

  • Camera Module
    • e-CAM130_CUMI1820_MOD with S-mount lens holder
    • based on Aptina AR1820HS sensor.
    • Max S/N ratio: – 36.3 dB;  Dynamic Range: – 65.8 dB
  • Interface – 4-lane MIPI CSI-2 interface
  • Resolution / Frame rate – VGA @ 90 fps, 720p @ 60 fps, 1080p @ 30 fps, UltraHD (3840×2160) @ 22 fps, 13MP (4224×3156) @ 14 fps. Values are the same for MJPEG or YUV422.
  • Connector – 125-pin connector for Jetson TK1
  • Power requirements – ~ 2.5W
  • Dimensions – 65.27 mm x 55 mm x 27.3 mm
  • Weight – 3.55 grams with lens
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -30° to 70° C; Stable image: 0° to 50° C

 

Tegra_TK1_MIPI_CSI_CameraThe camera supports Linux, with V4L2 camera drivers, and sample application with source code provided. You can find documentation including the datasheet, and a getting started guide for Jetson TK1 in their documentation page. Android drivers are also being worked on. You can watch a demo of the camera in Ubuntu 14.04 with GUVC Viewer (ecam_tk1_guvcview) sample application.

e-CAM130_CUTK1 camera board is available now, but price has not been publicly released. However, for reference e-CAM130_CUMI1820_MOD camera module used in this kit sells for $169 per unit, with the price dropping to $89 for 1k orders.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

TBS 2980 Matrix 2 AllWinner A80 Android TV Box Will Support USB Tuners

April 23rd, 2015 9 comments

TBS launched their Matrix 2910 media player based on Freescale i.MX6 Quad processor in 2013, and what made the platform especially interesting was support for the company’s USB DVB tuners in their Android and Ubuntu images. The company has now unveiled its successor with TBS 2980 Matrix 2 powered by Allwinner A80 octa core processor that will also support USB DVB-T2, DVB-C & DVB-S2 tuners.

TBS_Matrix_2TBS Matrix 2 specifications:

  • SoC – AllWinner A80 4x Cortex 15, 4x Cortex A7 big.LITTLE processor with PowerVR GC6230 GPU
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC + micro SD card slot
  • Video  Output – HDMI + AV port
  • Audio – HDMI, AV, and optical S/PDIF
  • Connectivity – Gigabit Ethernet, dual band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0 port, 2x USB 2.0 host ports
  • Misc – IR receiver, reset button
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A
  • Dimensions – 101 x 101 x 31 mm
  • Weight – 400 grams

Matrix 2 is significantly smaller than other Allwinner A80 devices like Tronsmart Draco AW80, mostly because it lacks the rather slow SATA port. The box runs Android 4.4 with Kodi pre-installed, and will ship with a power adapter, a remote control, and a user’s guide. I’ve also been told the mini PC will also boot Debian server or Ubuntu Linaro desktop distributions from the micro SD card.

TBS_Matrix_2_ARM_mini_PCThe list of supported USB tuners are not been provided, but I do know TBS 5520 multi-standard USB tuner will be used for development, and it supports DVB-S/S2, DVB-C/C2, DVB-T/T2, and ISBT standards, so all these should be covered. It’s quite likely tuners supported by the original Matrix mini PC will also be supported on Matrix 2.

TBS_5520_TunerTBS Matrix 2 sells for $149.99 plus shipping on BuyDVD.net. You may find more details on TBS 2980 Matrix 2 product page.

Thanks to Ovi for the tip.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

UDOO Neo Combines Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Sensors into a Single $49 Board (Crowdfunding)

April 21st, 2015 6 comments

UDOO Neo was unveiled last February as the first hobbyist board features Freecale i.MX6 Solox Cortex A9 + Cortex M4 processor. I was expecting UDOO to design support board since their earlier UDOO board combined Freescale i.MX6 processor with an Atmel MCU, and the new processor allowed for integrating the same functionality into a single chip. The board is now on Kickstarter where you can pick UDOO Neo Basic for $49 (Early bird is $35), or UDOO Neo for $59 (Early bird was $45) adding an Ethernet port, some sensors, and 1GB RAM, instead of 512 MB for the Basic version.UDOO_Neo_Kickstarter

But both versions of the board basically share the same specifications:

  • SoC – Freescale i.MX 6SoloX ARM Cortex-A9 core @ 1GHz with 2D/3D GPU and ARM Cortex-M4 Core @ 166 MHz
  • System Memory – 512MB (Basic) or 1GB DDR3
  • Storage – micro SD slot, 8-bit SDIO interface (on expansion headers)
  • Video Input/Output
    • micro HDMI port
    • LVDS interface + touch (I2C signals)
    • Analog camera connection supporting NTSC and PAL
    • 8-bit Parallel camera interface (on expansion headers)
  • Audio – HDMI, I2S and S/PDIF (on expansion headers)
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 Type A ports, 1x USB OTG (micro-AB connector)
  • Connectivity
    • Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n (Wi-Fi Direct supported), Bluetooth 3.0 / 4.0 Low Energy
    • UDOO Neo only – 10/100Mbps RJ45 connector
  • Arduino UNO compatible and extended GPIOs headers giving access to the following:
    • Serial – 3x UART ports, 2x CAN Bus
    • 8x PWM
    • 1x I2C interface, 1x SPI interface
    • 36 GPIOs
    • 6 Analog inputs
  • Sensors (UDOO Neo only) – 9-Axis Accelerometer, Magnetometer, & Gyroscope
  • Misc – Coin Cell RTC Battery Connector, Green Power Status LED, Configurable Red LED
  • Power Supply – 5V DC Micro USB;  12V DC power jack
  • Dimensions – 85mm x 59.3 mm

The board features Arduino compatible headers, and can be programmed with an Arduino IDE running on a separate PC or in the board itself. It has similar functionalities as the Raspberry Pi as it runs Linux (and Android), and offers similar interfaces, but adds Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Smart, and 9-axis motion sensors. So if you have a project that requires the power of Linux, and the I/O flexibility of Arduino, UDOO Neo boards should cost a little bit less than competing solutions, be easier to configure, and provide a more compact solution.

UDOO_Neo_Arduino_Raspberry_PiThe ARM Cortex A9 core will run Android 4.4.3 + Linux 3.10, with UDOObuntu distribution to become available before the board ships, and the ARM Cortex M4 should run MXQ RTOS. Android and Linux source code will be provided. They also claim UDOO Neo will be open source hardware like the original UDOO. However, a Google search for the older board only shows UDOO schematics in PDF format, but after checking a bit more, I found the documentation page where the Gerber files, BoM, and mechanical files are also freely downloadable. Since the original schematics are not available, it’s not 100% open source hardware, but it’s still better than what is provided for the Raspberry Pi boards.

Since it’s UDOO project team have been around for a while, there’s already an active community, and several example projects for the older boards, but many should be adaptable to the Neo boards, and since it’s Arduino compatible, you can also leverage existing Arduino libraries and sketches.

The Kickstarter campaign started yesterday, and they already raised over $40,000 out of their $15,000 goals. Beside the pledges for UDOO Neo boards, they also have various kits including one with a 7″ LCD touchscreen display, a power supply, and cables, and bundles with up to 5 boards. Delivery is scheduled for September 2015.

A few more details may also be found on UDOO Neo product page.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

HPC Performance & Power Usage Comparison – Intel Xeon E3 vs Intel Atom C2720 vs Applied Micro X-Gene 1 vs IBM Power 8

April 14th, 2015 6 comments

Last year, the CERN published a paper comparing Applied Micro X-Gene (64-bit ARM) vs Intel Xeon (64-bit x86) Performance and Power Usage, and they’ve now added IBM Power 8 and Intel Atom Avoton C2750 processor to the mix in a new presentation entitled “A look beyond x86: OpenPOWER & AArch64“.
ARM_x86_Power_8_Test_Systems
So four systems based on Intel Xeon E3-1285L, Intel Atom C2750, Applied Micro X-Gene 1, and IBM Power 8 were compared, all running Fedora 21, except the HP Moonshot 1500 ARM plarform running Ubuntu 14.04 and an older kernel. All four systems use gcc 4.9.2, and Racktivity intelligent PDUs were used for power measurement.

I’ll just share some of their results, you can read the presentation, or go through the benchmark results to find out more.

HEP-SPEC06_Results

HEP-SPEC06 Benchmark (Click to Enlarge)

HEP-SPEC06 is a new High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark for measuring CPU performance developed by the HEPiX Benchmarking Working Group, and here it’s not surprising to see the low power solutions under-perform the more powerful Intel Xeon and Power 8 processors, with the latter taking the crown.

Geant_4_ParFullCMS

Geant 4 ParFullCMS (Click to Enlarge)

Geant 4 simulates the passage of particles through matter, something that you would expect the CERN to do regularly. Intel Xeon E3 outperforms  IBM Power8 processor here.

But let’s move on to power consumption, and performance per watt.

Idle Power Consumption (Click to Enlarge)

Idle Power Consumption (Click to Enlarge)

IBM OpenPower 8 has a much higher power consumption than other systems, and HP Moonshot ARM 64-bit X-Gene 1 consumes more than both Intel servers. The chart under full load (not shown here) also shows a similar pattern.

HEP_SPEC06_Per_Watt

HEP-SPEC06 per Watt (Click to Enlarge)

When it comes to performance per watt however, both HP Moonshot ARM and Power 8 systems are the least efficient here, and Intel systems provide the best ratio. Bear in mind that X-Gene 1 is manufactured with a 40nm process, while Applied Micro X-Gene 2  and 3 will be manufactured using 28nm and 16 nm FinFET processes, so some large efficiency gains could be expected here.

We may find out soon, as the CERN expects to add these two new processors, as well a Cavium ThunderX to their benchmarks in the future.

Thanks to David for the tip.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

How to Program STMicro STM8S $1 Board in Linux

April 13th, 2015 9 comments

In January, I discovered there was such thing as a one dollar development board based on STMicro STM8S103F3P6 8-bit MCU with 1KB SRAM, 8KB flash, and 640 bytes EEPROM, some GPIOs as well as I2C, UART, SPI, ADC, and PWM signals. Links to documentation and source code were provided, but development tools were only Windows based. However, one of my reader informed me SDCC (Small Devices C Compiler) supported STM8, and development in Linux should be feasible. So I decided to buy the board on eBay for $1.62, as well as an ST_link V2 programmer for STM8 / STM32 for $4.52 in order to flash the firmware.

The board came pretty quickly, i.e. within 2 to 3 weeks.

STM8S103F3_BoardBut due to a lost package, the programmer took nearly 3 months to reach me, as the seller had to re-send after I failed to receive it within 2 months.

ST-Link_V2_ProgrammerIt comes with 4 wires that need to be connected to RST/NRST, 3.3V, SWIM, and GND. To do so, I had to solder a 4-pin header on the side of the board.

To get started with STM8 on Linux, I found some information on ColeVision website where they explained how to run Drystone on STM8/128-EVAL board using SDCC as the compiler, and stm8flash to program the board.

So I’ve given it a try on Ubuntu 14.04 with the simple goal of blinking the TEST LED on the board. sdcc is an Ubuntu package, so it’s pretty easy to install:

sudo apt-get install sdcc

Let’s check the version and some more information:

sdcc --version
SDCC : mcs51/gbz80/z80/z180/r2k/r3ka/ds390/pic16/pic14/TININative/ds400/hc08/s08 3.3.0 #8604 (Dec 30 2013) (Linux)

That’s version 3.3.0 released in December 2013 and it lacks STM8 supports, but the latest version (sdcc v3.4.0) has been released in April 2014, and we can get it with a PPA, so let’s use that one instead:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:laczik/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get remove sdcc sdcc-libraries
sudo apt-get install sdcc

If you are using Ubuntu 14.10 or greater, you’ll already get the latest version.

Let’s double check stm8 is indeed supported:

sdcc --version
SDCC : mcs51/z80/z180/r2k/r3ka/gbz80/tlcs90/ds390/pic16/pic14/TININative/ds400/hc08/s08/stm8 3.4.0 #8981 (Jan 10 2015) (Linux)
published under GNU General Public License (GPL)

Great! stm8 is now present in the list of supported MCUs.

For the next step was to install stm8flash tool to program the device:

git clone https://github.com/vdudouyt/stm8flash.git
cd stm8flash
make
sudo make install

Now I had to find some code samples to blink the LED. I started but checking the samples for ST Visual Programmer and IAR tools, combine with a modified version of Drystone source code, but I always had some issues with the header files, and it seems a bit more work than expected. But then I discovered that Valentin Dudouyt, stm8flash developer, also provided code samples in his github account, including a blinky sample:

git clone https://github.com/vdudouyt/sdcc-examples-stm8.git
cd sdcc-examples-stm8

First, I tried to compile the samples, and they failed because sp_test.c was missing, so I edited the Makefile to remove sp_test.ihx, and build was successful. The LED on the board is connected to B5 GPIO, so at that point I had to check out STM8S103F3 datasheet to find out more about the registers used in the sample. The register map is in section 6.2 of the document, and I need to use three registers:

  • PB_ODR – Port B data output latch register (Sets pin HIGH or LOW)
  • PB_DDR – Port B data direction register (Sets direction to INPUT or OUTPUT)
  • PB_CR1 – Port B control register 1

Since pin 5 correspond to 00100000 (0x20) I updated blinky.c sample as follows:

#include "stm8l.h"

int main() {
        int d;
        // Configure pins
        PB_DDR = 0x20;
        PB_CR1 = 0x20;
        // Loop
        do {
                PB_ODR ^= 0x20;
                for(d = 0; d < 29000; d++) { }
        } while(1);
}

I typed make again to generate an updated firmware (blinky.ihx), and flash it as follows:

stm8flash -c stlinkv2 -p stm8s103 -w blinky.ihx
Determine FLASH area
Writing Intel hex file 189 bytes at 0x8000... OK
Bytes written: 189

All good and the LED started blinking…
STM8S_Blink_LED

So now you should be able to write simple program to control other GPIOs, I2C, SPI, UART with the board. But if your program is a little more complex a debugger could be useful, and there’s Texane STLink working on Windows, Mac, and Linux, that can run gdbserver for STM32… But I tried it for STM8.

git clone https://github.com/texane/stlink
cd stlink
./autogen.sh
make -j8

Then I ran st-link:

./st-util
2015-04-13T16:44:34 INFO src/stlink-usb.c: -- exit_dfu_mode
2015-04-13T16:44:34 INFO src/stlink-common.c: Loading device parameters....
2015-04-13T16:44:34 WARN src/stlink-common.c: unknown chip id! 0xe0042000

Hmmm, it does not look good, and sadly there’s no support for STM8 yet, as STM32 and STM8 use different interfaces (SWD vs SWIM).

So if you have troubles debugging your program, you may have to revert to Windows based tools, at least for now, unless you’re up for the task and want to add STM8 support to Texane.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter

VX2 Celeron J1800 / J1900 mini PCs with 500GB Hard Drive Sell for $180 and Up (Promo)

April 8th, 2015 10 comments

CSQ CSW9 is an Intel Celeron J900 based mini PC with a 500GB HDD that normally sells for a little over $200 on Aliexpress once shipping is included. But today, as I found a list of Geekbuying Coupons via Google+, I noticed the device was listed on Geekbuying as VX2, and both Celeron J1800 and J1900 versions were available for respectively $179.99 and $189.99 after applying MYMVECMY coupon, which looks like a decent deals since a 500GB 2.5″ SATA drive costs about $45.

VX2_mini_PCSpecifications listed on Geekbuying are mostly the same as for CSQ CSW9 except some difference highlighted in bold or stricken-through when removed:

  • SoC – Intel Celeron J1800 dual core processor @ 2.41 GHz (base) / 2.58 GHz (burst),  or J1900 Quad core processor  @ 2.0 GHz (base) / 2.41 GHz (Burst) with Intel HD graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory – 2 GB DDR3L 1066/1333 MHz
  • Storage – 2.5″ 500GB SATA hard drive + micro SD card slot + optional 32GB to 128GB eMMC flash
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4a + VGA with dual independent display support
  • Connectivity – 10/100M Ethernet (Gigabit Ethernet as option), 802.11 b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Audio – Realtek ALC269 HD audio codec, 1x headphone jack
  • USB – 3x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x USB 3.0 port.
  • Misc – IR receiver, power button, and power LED
  • Power Supply – 19V/2.1A
  • Battery – 2,000 mAh (only claimed by one seller)
  • Dimensions – 153.4 x 153.4 x 38 mm
  • Weight – 440 grams

VX2_mini_PC_HDMI_VGA_Ethernet
The computer only ships with its power supply, is said to come with Windows 8.1 pre-installed (likely without proper license), and the company claims Android & Windows 8.1 Dual Boot, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.. can also be installed.

GeekBuying $50 coupon in only valid until April 14,2015. although I’ve seen them withdraw coupons earlier, if a promotion is a bit too popular… An alternative is eBay where VX2 J1800 sells for $188.99 and VX2 J1900 for $197.99.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Buzz This
Vote on DZone
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Kick It on DotNetKicks.com
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter