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Posts Tagged ‘ubuntu’

Linaro 15.01 Release with Linux 3.19 and Android 5.0

January 30th, 2015 No comments

Linaro has just announced the first release of the year with Linux 3.19-rc3 (baseline), Linux 3.10.65 and 3.14.29 (LSK), Android 5.0.2, and Ubuntu Linaro Utopic.

Changes seem to have focused on ARM, Qualcomm, and HiSilicon hardware platforms such as Juno, and IFC6410, and some work has been done on Debian ARM64 rootfs.

Here are the highlights of this release:

  • Linux Linaro 3.19-rc5-2015.01
    • GATOR topic updated to version 5.20.1
    • builddeb topic: fixes for the dtb files location changes in 3.19 (vendor subdir introduced)
    • updated integration-linaro-vexpress64 topic by ARM LT (FVP Base and Foundation models, and Juno support)
    • updated topic from Qualcomm LT (IFC6410 board support)
    • updated topic from HiSilicon LT (Hi36xx, HiP04, and X5HD2 families support)
    • updated LLVM topic (uses the community llvmlinux-latest branch)
    • Included ILP32 patch set v3 rebased on 3.19-rc5. Initial tests using syscalls LTP tests are done: msgctl07 stalls when using ILP32 userland (no stall with LP64 userland).
    • config fragments updated:  audit.conf added to enable the audit feature testing on ARMv8; vexpress64: enabled devices used on Juno; Linaro builds of AOSP 15.01 is released
  • Android builds have been updated to 5.0.2
  • Juno firmware has been updated to 0.10.1
  • Linaro OpenEmbedded 2015.01
    • integrated Linaro binutils 2.25-2015.01
    • fixed linux-dummy after shared workdir changes in oe-core
    • updated linux-linaro(-stable) recipes
    • cleaned up overlayed recipes
    • added image recipe for ILP32 with LTP included
    • fixed GCC-4.8 builds
    • fixed LNG x86 machines
    • added workaround LAVA-isms with shell prompt
    • updated GATOR recipe to 5.20.1
    • upstreaming – fixed libgpg recipe in oe-core
  • Linaro Ubuntu 15.01
    • updated packages: Juno firmware 0.10.1, linux-firmware (include firmware needed for Linaro Community Builds), LSK 3.10.65/3.14.29 and linux-linaro 3.19-rc5 kernels
  • CI bring up: UpdateCapsule functionality testing
  • Debian x86_64 kernel/rootfs build with NFS support
  • CI bring up: audit enabled build
  • Add Debian ARM64 rootfs

You can visit https://wiki.linaro.org/Cycles/1501/Release for a list of known issues, and further release details about the LEB, LMB (Linaro Member Builds), and community builds, as well as Android, Kernel, Graphics, Multimedia, Landing Team, Platform, Power management and Toolchain components.

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Online Labs pBox (C1 Node) is a mini ARM Server with 4 Gigabit Ethernet Ports, mSATA and mPCIe Slots

January 30th, 2015 10 comments

Online Labs, a subsidiary of Iliad (free), recently launched hosting services with dedicated ARM servers based on Marvell processor with modules they call C1. The company has decided to design a baseboard (pBox) for C1 module, and, as I understand it, plans to sell it to the public. It’s an exciting development for those who are looking for affordable and tiny purpose built Linux ARM servers.

pBox_ARM_mini_Server

Preliminary C1 Node / pBox mini server specifications (based on C1 specs and bits of information gathered online):

  • SoC – Marvell Armada 370/XP quad core ARMv7 processor @ up to 1.2 GHz
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 256 MB NAND flash + mSATA slot + eSATA port + micro SD slot
  • Connectivity – 4x Gigabit Ethernet ports
  • USB – 1x micro USB port
  • Expansion – mini PCie, 1x 20-pin header for expansion (no details yet)
  • Debugging – 20-pin JTAG connector
  • Power Supply – Power barrel (5V?)

C1_ARM_mini_Server_Board

Supported operating systems should be the same as on the hosted instances including Ubuntu 14.04 or 14.10, Debian Wheezy, Gentoo, Fedora 20, and so on. You can watch the 3D render video of the board below to check out the mSATA and mPCIe slots under the board.


Availability has not been announced yet, except it’s expected shortly. The company also teased us with the message “time to upgrade your #RaspberryPi”, so it should be competitively priced too.

Via Vik and Sebastien BENOIT.

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X29 Intel Celeron J1800 / J1900 mini PC Sells for $125 and Up

January 26th, 2015 10 comments

Today, somebody asked me to test 4K output on Intel Atom Z3735F, but I can’t do that since the platform only supports 1080p. As I just posted my unboxing of MeLE PCG03 mini PC, I noticed several ICs where added for extra functionalities, and people also started to complain about lack of Gigabit Ethernet, Fast Ethernet via a USB bridge, no USB 3.0, and no SATA. That’s what happens when you use a Tablet SoC in a mini PC, but if you’re ready to pay a little more, you could still get a mini PC with a proper desktop processor (Bay Trail-D) including SATA, USB 3.0, and Gigabit Ethernet (maybe) for about $125 (shipped) with X29-J1800 computer powered by Intel Celeron J1800 (10W TDP). That’s the price for the barebone system without RAM or storage, and if you want a complete system with 32GB eMMC and 4GB RAM the price goes up to about $200 including shipping via DHL. The quad core version with J1900 is also available for about $20 more. None of these processors support 4K video output however, as the maximum listed resolution is 1080p.

X29_Celeron-J1900_computer

X29 specifications:

 

  • SoC
    • Intel Celeron J1800 dual core processor @ 2.41 GHz (base) / 2.58 GHz (Burst) with Intel HD graphics (10W TDP) or
    • Intel Celeron J1900 Quad core processor  @ 2.0 GHz (base) / 2.41 GHz (Burst) with Intel HD graphics (10W TDP)
  • System Memory – 2x SO-DIMM sockets for unbuffered dual channel DDR3L 1066/1333/1600 MHz SDRAM up to 8GB
  • Storage – 1x SATA 6Gb/s, 1x mini SATA 3Gb/s
  • Video Output – HDMI + VGA
  • Connectivity – 2x Ethernet ports (via Realtek RTL8111E Gigabit Ethernet controller or RTL8103EL fast Ethernet controller), optional Wireless network card
  • Audio – Realtek ALC662 HD audio codec, 1x microphone jack, 1x LINE OUT jack
  • USB – 2x  USB 2.0 host portm 2x USB 3.0 ports.
  • Expansion slot – 1x Mini-PCIE slot
  • Misc – COM port (RJ45). power button, power LED
  • Power Supply – 12V
  • Dimensions – 134 x 124 x 36 mm
  • Certifications – CE, FCC, RoHS
  • Temperature Range – Operating: 0 to 60 C; Storage: -20 to 85 C

 

There’s also a 64MB DPI flash ROM for AMI UEFI BIOS. The system is said to be fanless, but at the same time they “suggest to use system fan”, so I’m not sure what that mean, unless there’s a fan connector, and you can add a fan yourself. It’s not clear whether the two LAN ports are Fast or Gigabit Ethernet, as descriptions are inconsistent.

X29-J1800_mini_PCIt’s also not 100% sure how you’d fit a 2.5″ SATA drive inside, so a mini SATA drive should be a more workable option, and should be included when storage is offered.

X29_SATAThere’s no mention of operating system, although the product title may include Windows or Ubuntu, even with system without storage, so you’d have to take care of that yourself. Ubuntu is not always perfectly running on Atom Z3735F processor (e.g. Wi-Fi, audio), and to be honest, I’m not sure of the support for Celeron J1800 / J1900 processor, but it’s at least two Celeron J1900 computers and five Celeron J1800 PCs are listed as certified on Ubuntu website.

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Intel Education Content Access Point Is Designed for Schools with Unreliable Internet Connectivity and Power

January 23rd, 2015 5 comments

Intel has introduced a new device that stores, manages, and publishes digital content for schools with low or intermittent connectivity and /or power.  The device stores training materials in its internal storage, comes with a battery, and can be accessed by up to 50 students simultaneously.

Intel_Education_Content_Access_Point

Specifications:

  • SoC –  Intel Atom Bay Trail-I E3815 Processor @ 1.46GHz with Intel HD graphics
  • System Memory – 2GB DDR3L-1067
  • Storage – 8GB eMMC, Optional 500GB SATA HDD
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n/ac, Wired Gigabit Ethernet, Optional 3G, Optional LTE
  • USB – 1x USB 3.0
  • Misc – System and 3G/LTE LEDs, Factory reset and power buttons
  • Power Supply – 12V/2A
  • Battery – Lithium-ion polymer 7.4v, 4050mAh (up to 5 hours of battery life)
  • Dimensions –  190 x 190 x 30mm
  • Weight – 607 grams

Intel_Education_Router_PortsThe system runs Ubuntu 12.04. The optional 500GB hard drive includes 400GB of preloaded content, and educator can use the remaining 100GB to add their own content via the USB 3.0 port.

Price and availability details have not been released by Intel. You may want to check out Intel Education Content Access Point product page for a few more details.

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Ugoos UT3S is an Update to UT3 Android & Ubuntu TV Box with a Fan

January 23rd, 2015 10 comments

Many people like ARM based media player because most of them run Android providing access too many apps available via Google Play Store, a similar experience to what they got used with phones and tablets, and also because they are small, inexpensive, and fanless. However, the latest ARM processors such as Rockchip RK3288, can get really hot, so most of the time CPU frequency needs to be limited to avoid overheating and stability, which reduces performance. Which may be why, Ugoos decided to launch UT3S mini PC, an upgrade to UT3 mini PC with a mini Fan placed on top of a larger heatsink.
Ugoos_UT3SUgoos UT3S specifications and look remain very similar to the original model:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3288 quad core CortexA17 @ 1.80 GHz + Mali-T764 GPU with support for OpenGL ES 1.1/2.0 /3.0, and OpenCL 1.1
  • System Memory – 2GB to 4GB DDR3
  • Storage – 16GB or 32GB eMMC Flash + micro SD card slot (up to 32 GB)
  • Connectivity – 100M/1000M Ethernet, dual band WiFi 802.11 b/g/n (2.4GHz/5GHz) and 802.11 a/c using external Wi-Fi antenna?, and Bluetooth
  • Video I/F – HDMI 2.0 output (female) up to 4k2k @ 60 fps, and AV output (3.5mm jack)
  • Audio I/F – HDMI, AV, and optical S/PDIF
  • Video Codecs
    • Decoding – MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4,H.263, H.264, H.265,AVS, VC-1, RV, VP6/VP8, Sorenson Spark, MVC up to 4K2K @ 60fps
    • Encoding – H.264, H.265, VP8, MVC (1080p)
    • H.264, H.265 Data Rate – Up to 60Mbps
  • Audio Codecs/Formats – MP1, MP2, MP3, WMA, WAV, OGG, OGA, APE, FLAC, AAC, M4A, 3GPP
  • USB – 4x USB Host port, 1x micro USB OTG
  • Power Supply – 5V/3A
  • Dimensions – 115 x 115 x 20 mm
  • Temperature Range – Operating: -10~40℃, Storage: -20~50℃
  • Humidity – 5%-90%, No condensation
  • Certification – CCC,CE,EMC,FCC,Wi-Fi

The company also decided to remove the HDMI input, and replace it with a USB host port. It’s probably not a big loss since I’ve yet to see a Rockchip box with HDMI input support PVR or PiP. The base frequency is listed as 1.8GHz in the specs, but with the fan it should be possible safely (TBC) to overclock RK3288 to 2.2 GHz, The box comes with an HDMI cable, a power adapter, an IR remote control, and a user’s manual by default, and optionally an air mouse, or a wireless mouse or keyboard combo may be provided.
Ugoos_UT3S_fan
The device runs the dual boot Android 4.4 + Ubuntu 14.10 image I tried with Ugoos UM3. The user experience should be the same as any other boxes in Android, and Ubuntu is very usable as long as you don’t try to play full screen 480p or greater online videos smoothly in a web browser, and also don’t expect Adobe flash to run nice and smooth.

Two version of Ugoos UTS3 are available:

  • Ugoos UT3S Black with 2GB RAM and 16GB flash
  • Ugoos UT3S Red with 4GB RAM and 32GB flash

Both models are available for pre-order on GearBest for  $129 and $169 with “UT3S” coupon. I could not find it on other sites, except on DealsMachine, but while the title refers to UT3S, the description is fully about UM3…

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Snappy Ubuntu Core is an IoT Linux Distribution for ARM and x86

January 21st, 2015 14 comments

Canonical has announced a version of Ubuntu specifically designed for IoT devices running Linux, with a low hardware requirements, and a new package manager called snappy, replacing apt-get for this version of Ubuntu, which provides simpler, faster, and more reliable updates, stronger security, and allows roll-backs in case something goes wrong. Easy firmware updates are something missing in most connected device, which means they are more vulnerable to potential hackers, but with snappy security updates should be able to make it regularly, so that if something like heartbleed occurs again, you know your router, home automation gateway, connected washing machine, or robot will be soon patched automatically.

Snappy Ubuntu Core Logo

Snappy Ubuntu Core Logo

Let’s go through the hardware requirements first:

  • Processor – 600 MHz processor (ARMv7 or greater, or x86)
  • System Memory – 128 MB RAM or greater (The system itself uses 40 MB RAM)
  • Storage – 4GB flash / storage for factory reset and system rollback

So the hardware requirements are not quite as low as something as OpenWRT, but still lower than what you’d expect from Ubuntu, so you could use an old laptop or PC as a development platform, and Canonical also recommends BeagleBone Black or ODROID-C1 ARM based development boards. The Raspberry Pi board won’t work with Snappy, because Broadcom BCM2835 processor is using an older architecture (ARMv6) not supported by Ubuntu.

Snappy Architecture

Snappy Architecture

Twenty one companies and organization have partnered with Canonical on Snappy Ubuntu Core:

  • Home automation – Ninjablocks (Ninjasphere), Openhab (smarthub framework), Trasibot
  • Robotic – OSRF – ROS robots, , Erle Robotics with Erle-Copter
  • Development Boards – Hardkernel ODROID-C1, Beagleboarg community’s Beaglebone Black, Lemaker (Banana Pro), Udoo, LinkSprite (PCDuino), and Parallella
  • Silicon Vendors – Allwinner
  • IoT frameworks – Kaa, DeviceHive, IoTSys, Resin.io, OpenSensors.io
  • Misc- Riot-OS, Nwave, Fairwaves,  Docker with Weave

As mentioned in the introduction, apt-get is no where to be found in Snappy, as the distribution is using snappy instead, but the command line options remain familiar in some aspects:

$ sudo snappy install docker
docker      4 MB    [=====================================================]   OK
Part          Tag         Installed        Available        Fingerprint       Active
docker        edge        1.3.2.004        -                788b0787b18b1c    *

with various new/different options like info, search, versions and more:

$ snappy versions -a
PART               TAG      INSTALLED           AVAILABLE   FINGERPRINT   ACTIVE
ubuntu-core        edge     14.11.1-20141130    -           4e8c32456ab10
ubuntu-core        edge     14.12.1-20141201    -           7611de9a73923 *
docker             edge     1.1.21              -           34b32c359a08e *
hello-world        edge     1.0                 -           27e98ab23492c *

You can see in the list above two version of ubuntu-core, with one ACTIVE and the previous available for roll-back with the command:

$ sudo snappy rollback ubuntu-core
rolling back ubuntu-core -> (edge 14.11.1-20141130 8337ce7b64821)
Reboot to use the new ubuntu-core.

You can find more example in Ubuntu Developer’s snappy page, and find out snappy can also be used to build software packages from source.

There’s also a work-in-progress web interface called WebDM (Web Device Manager) used to configure the device and install packages. It can be installed with sudo snappy install webdm, but Canonical warns it should not be enabled in production devices for now, as access control is not implemented yet.

WebDM

WebDM

If you want to try it, you don’t even need extra hardware, as a Snappy Ubuntu Core instances can be launched from Azure, GCE or Amazon EC2  cloud services, or run in a Virtual Machine with KVM, OVA (VMWare, VirtualBox,…) or Vagrant. All you have to do is follow the instructions provided here. Complete instructions and a preview image are also available for the BeagleBone Black. There does not seem to be pre-built images yet for the other ARM boards mentioned in this article.

Via LinuxGizmos

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Install Ubuntu 14.10 on MeegoPad T01 with a Live ISO Image

January 19th, 2015 3 comments

MeegoPad T01 has recently been shown to boot Ubuntu and Android, but no installation disk had been provided so far. But thanks to deadhp1, there’s now a “beta” Ubuntu 14.10 image with MATE desktop environment available for download in order to try or install Ubuntu on MeegoPad T01, and other Intel Atom Bay Trail-T devices.

Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Live ISO (Click to Enlarge)

Ubuntu MATE 14.10 Live ISO (Click to Enlarge)

Before you decide to try or install the image, be aware that audio and Bluetooth are not working for now, but everything else should work, including hardware video decoding in Kodi. If your device is not using a Realtek rtl8723bs module, Wi-Fi won’t work, and you may need to use a USB Ethernet dongle to get IP connectivity. The instructions will keep your Windows 8.1 installation too, albeit I suppose you could also wipe out the Windows 8.1 partition completely and run Ubuntu only on the device. If the instructions are not followed carefully, you may brick your mini PC / HDMI Stick.

So if you’d still like to go ahead, you can download ubuntu_mate_1410_baytrail_hybrid_efi_test_17.iso, and burn the image to a USB flash drive using Rufus or  Unetbootin. Then insert the USB flash drive into your Bay Trail mini PC, turn it on, and press the F7 key to select boot. Your system should now be running Ubuntu from the USB flash drive (Username and password are both baytrail). So far, the procedure should be 100% safe.

If you want to install the image to the internal storage, and keep Windows too. You’ll first need to modify the partitions with Gparted first, then click on Applications->System Tools->Systemback to install Ubuntu. You can follow the instructions in the video made by deadhp1 to re-partition your system, and install Ubuntu MATE 14.10 to the eMMC flash. One very important point is:do NOT format your EFI partition (on meegopad-t01 /dev/mmcblk0p1), or you will lose your ability to boot if you do. Make sure to uncheck the format box.”

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Downloading Files on Baidu, or via HTTP, Bittorrent or Metalink in Linux with BaiduExporter, Aria2 and YAAW

January 14th, 2015 4 comments

Most firmware files distributed by the manufacturers are uploaded to Baidu, but I’ve found the service not to be always reliable, especially for larger files. In Windows, people are recommended to use Baidu software (BaiduYunGuanjia), but there’s not such tool in Linux, so instead I investigate for command lines tools to download files from Baidu, and this lead me to two interesting tools called Aria2, a “lightweight multi-protocol & multi-source command-line download utility. It supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, BitTorrent and Metalink”, and YAAW “Yet Another Aria2 Web Frontend” with allow to start and monitor download locally or remotely.

But let’s start with the first tool I found: pan-baidu-download, a Python script to download files from Baidu.

To install it:

git clone https://github.com/banbanchs/pan-baidu-download.git
cd pan-baidu-download

We also need to install some dependencies (assuming python 2.7.x is already installed):

sudo apt-get install python-pip aria2

and then you can start downloading files as follows:

./python bddown_cli.py download http://pan.baidu.com/s/somerandomcharacters

But after posting a bug about password-protected download, which was fixed in 2 minutes by the developers, I was informed the script does not support directories, and was recommended to use BaiduExporter add-on for Chrome or Firefox instead.

Everything is in Chinese, and after installing the add-on I was not clear how to use it but I figured it out eventually.

First you need to run aria2c:

aria2c --enable-rpc --rpc-listen-all=true --rpc-allow-origin-all

01/14 11:01:42 [NOTICE] IPv4 RPC: listening on TCP port 6800

01/14 11:01:42 [NOTICE] IPv6 RPC: listening on TCP port 6800

The command line above is insecure if you plan to run it on a remote server, as anybody could access it, and start download on your server.  But for testing, and local download this will do. If you stop aria2c, the downloads won’t restart with this command, but there are options that support this, but again, I have not looked into details for this quick test.

Now go to the Baidu download link, select the files and/or folders you want to download, and provided you’ll already installed Baidu Exporter add-on, a new menu will be shown, and all you have to do is click on ARIA2 RPC to start the download in aria2. The last options with two Chinese ideogram is the option, where you can change the IP of the aria2 server (localhost:6800) by default as well as other settings.

BaiduExporter_Firefox

Baidu Download with BaiduExporter in Firefox (Click to Enlarge)

You can now close the Baidu window in your web browser. and should see the download as started in the terminal:

aria2c --enable-rpc --rpc-listen-all=true --rpc-allow-origin-all
01/14 11:01:42 [NOTICE] IPv4 RPC: listening on TCP port 6800
01/14 11:01:42 [NOTICE] IPv6 RPC: listening on TCP port 6800
 *** Download Progress Summary as of Wed Jan 14 11:07:30 2015 ***
 ===============================================================================
 [#af540e 0B/0B CN:1 DL:0B]
 FILE: /media/hdd/edev/sandbox/yaaw/binux-yaaw-ab09f92/update1201-android/update.zip

This is all good, but in practise you’d probably want start aria2c when your computer boots and would not be able to monitor progress, especially if you use a remote server, and this is where YAAW comes into play.

To install it, check out the code from Github or download and extract the tar file. Now go to the directoty where you extract the file. and open index.html with your web browser. You can monitor download, or even add HTTP or Bittorrent Downloads. AFAIK, you can’t add Baidu links to YAAW directly, but you can monitor the downloads added via Baidu Exporter

Baidu and Bittorrent Downloads in YAAW

Baidu and Bittorrent Downloads in YAAW

The aria2c IP address and port can be changed in the settings directly from the main page. Some useful tips for YAAW:

  • All your settings on web is temporary. Settings will be lost after aria2 restarted.
  • Tasks (including those that are not finished) will be lost after aria2 is restarted. Use --save-session=SOME/WHERE and reload with --continue=true --input-file=SOME/WHERE to continue.
  • Use $HOME/.aria2/aria2.conf to save your options.

I haven’t gone into details, but Aria2 and YAAW could be used with a NAS, a cheap board with a USB harddrive, or even USB Wireless flash drive such a Zsun SD111 (which is now hackable even without serial debug board, as the default root password has just been cracked) to make a downloader to handle large downloads instead of leaving your PC on at night, or 24/7.

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