$199+ NVIDIA Jetson Orin Nano system-on-module delivers up to 40 TOPS

NVIDIA Jetson Orin Nano system-on-module (SoM) is an update to the Jetson Nano entry-level Edge AI and robotics module that delivers up to 40 TOPS of AI performance, meaning it’s up to 80 times faster than the original module. The new SoM features an hexa-core Arm Cortex-A78AE processor, an up to 1024-core NVIDIA Ampere architecture GPU with 32 Tensor cores, up to 8GB RAM, and the same 260-pin SO-DIMM connector found in the Jetson Orin NX modules. Two versions are offered with the following specifications: That means the Jetson Orin family has now six modules ranging from 20 TOPS to 275 TOPS. There’s no specific development kit for the Jetson Orin Nano SoM since it can be emulated on the NVIDIA Jetson AGX Orin developer kit, and supported by the JetPack 5.0.2 SDK based on Ubuntu 20.04. NVIDIA has tested some dense INT8 and FP16 pre-trained models from NGC and […]

reComputer J101/J202 carrier boards are designed for Jetson Nano/NX/TX2 NX SoM

Seeed Studio’s reComputer J101 & J202 are carrier boards with a similar form factor as the ones found in NVIDIA Jetson Nano and Jetson Xavier NX developer kits, but with a slightly different feature set. The reComputer J101 notably features different USB Type-A/Type-C ports, a microSD card, takes power from a USB Type-C port, and drops the DisplayPort connector, while the reComputer J201 board replaces the micro USB device port with a USB Type-C port, adds a CAN Bus interface, and switches to 12V power input instead of 19V. The table below summarizes the features and differences between the Jetson Nano devkit (B1), reComputer J101, Jetson Xavier NX devkit, and reComputer J202. Note the official Jetson board should also support production SoM with eMMC flash, but they do ship with a non-production SoM with a built-in MicroSD card socket instead. The carrier boards are so similar that if NVIDIA would […]

Advertisement
Khadas Edge2 RK3588S Arm PC

NanoPi R4SE dual Gigabit Ethernet router adds 32GB eMMC flash

NanoPi R4SE is a variant of the Rockchip RK3399-powered NanoPi R4S dual Gigabit Ethernet router that adds a 32GB eMMC flash instead of only relying on a microSD card for the operating system. Most of the specifications remain the same with dual GbE, two USB 3.0 ports, but the router is now only offered with 4GB LPDDR4 and there’s no option for only 1GB RAM, and the GPIO and USB 2.0 headers are gone. The listed temperature range also changed from -20°C to 70°C to 0°C to 80°C. NanoPi R4SE specifications: SoC – Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor with dual-Core Cortex-A72 up to 2.0 GHz,  quad-core Cortex-A53 up to 1.5 GHz, Mali-T864 GPU with OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0/3.1, OpenCL, DX11, and AFBC support, 4K VP9 and 4K 10-bit H265/H264 60fps video decoder System Memory – 4GB LPDDR4 Storage – 32GB eMMC flash, MicroSD card slot Networking – 2x GbE, including one native Gigabit […]

Nano-U12P – An 8K digital signage player powered by an Intel Alder Lake processor

Alder Lake processors were first formally announced at the end of 2021 with the most powerful H-Series, followed by a range of Alder Lake Edge IoT processors, and in February, Intel officially launched Alder Lake P-Series and U-Series mobile hybrid processors which I had expected to find in several mini PCs by now. But apart from ASRock iBOX 1200 Series announcement, and leaks of the NUC 12 Studio Pro, I had not really seen any. But today, I found what looks like a mini PC with the Polywell Nano-U12P, but it’s instead marketed as an 8K digital signage player with a choice of Alder Lake P-series and U-series processors. Nano-U12P specifications: SoC (one of the other) Intel Core i7-1280P 6P+8E (20 threads) processor @ 3.60/4.80GHz with Intel Xe graphics; 20/28W TDP Intel Core i7-1270P 4P+8E (16 threads) processor @ 3.50/4.80GHz with Intel Xe graphics; 20/28W TDP Intel Core i7-1260P 4P+8E […]

CANDuino v3 – A Microchip ATmega168PA board with CAN bus, Arduino Nano form factor

CANduino v3 is the third revision of MassiveButDynamic’s CAN bus board with Arduino Nano form factor based on Microchip ATmega168PA 8-bit AVR microcontroller, Microchip MCP2515 CAN controller with an SPI interface, and Microchip MCP2551 CAN transceiver suitable for 12V and 24V systems. The CANDuino v3 board is now slightly narrower in order to give access to two rows on each side when installed on a breadboard, comes with a USB Type-C port to reduce the number of cables needed, and the CAN bus function can be deactivated via a jumper in order to use the CANduino as a normal Arduino Nano. CANDuino v3 specifications: MCU – Microchip ATmega168PA 8-bit AVR microcontroller @ up to 16 MHz with 16KB flash, 512 bytes EEPROM, 1 KB SRAM CAN Bus CAN L/H header and CAN bus termination Microchip MCP2515 CAN controller connected to the AVR microcontroller over SPI. Supports CAN V2.0B at 1 […]

Benchmarks comparison between UP 4000, Raspberry Pi 4, UP board, and Jetson Nano

We wrote about the UP 4000 SBC with an Intel Apollo Lake processor and Raspberry Pi form factor yesterday.  But today, I noticed the UP community had put up a benchmarks comparison between the UP 4000 board, the original UP board (Atom x5-8350), the Raspberry Pi 4, and NVIDIA Jetson Nano. They used several of the Phoronix Test Suite benchmarks running on Ubuntu 20.04 (x86) or Ubuntu 18.04 (Arm) on all four boards. The UP 4000 board used featured an Intel Celeron N3350 dual-core processor @ 2.40GHz, the 2GB RAM version of the UP Board, an RPi 4 with 4GB RAM, and a Jetson Nano developer kit with 4GB RAM. As one would have expected, the UP 4000 is ahead in most tests, even though they did not select a model with a quad-core processor such as a Pentium N4200. Note that reading the table may be confusing as for […]

Advertisement
Khadas VIM4 SBC

NanoPi R5S preview – Part 2: Ubuntu 20.04 (FriendlyCore)

I started the NanoPi R5S review with an unboxing, a teardown, a quick try of the pre-installed OpenWrt-based FriendlyWrt, and some iperf3 benchmarks on the 2.5GbE interfaces that were rather disappointing. I test further I switched to the Ubuntu 20.04-based FriendlyCore image since I’m more familiar with Debian-based operating systems, and some tools will not run on OpenWrt. Note the performance is still not quite optimal, and that’s why I call this a preview since numbers should improve in the next few months as more people tweak the software. OpenWrt optimizations? But feature jumping to Ubuntu, I gave an updated version of FriendlyWrt a give as FriendElec told me they had added some optimizations: We have made some optimizations on the new image, such as NIC interrupt settings, and offload support… So I downloaded “rk3568-eflasher-friendlywrt-20220526.img.gz” found on Google Drive, and flashed it to a microSD card with USBImager, and booted […]

NanoPi R5S router review – Part 1: Unboxing, OpenWrt, and iperf3 benchmarking

FriendlyElec has just launched the NanoPi R5S mini router powered by a Rockchip RK3568 processor, and the company kindly sent me two samples for review. In the first part of the review, I’ll check out the device itself, the internal design, the preinstalled OpenWrt, and run some networking benchmarks with iperf3. NanoPi R5S unboxing   The router comes fully assembled together with a 3M sheet with 6 rubber feet, which, as we’ll see below, are not really necessary. A microSD card socket can be found on one of the sides, while the rear panel comes with a USB-C port for power, a WiFi antenna hole (which can also be used to run cables for GPIO. UART console, etc…), two 2.5GbE RJ45 LAN ports, a Gigabit Ethernet WAN port, and HDMI video output. We’ll find a Mask button for firmware flashing on the other side, and the front panel features four […]

Advertisement