Applied Micro XC-1 Server Development Board (Mustang) is Now Available to Developers for $895

64-bit ARM server boards such as Applied Micro XC-1 Mustang and AMD Opteron A1100 development kit have been available since the beginning of the year, but only to selected companies, and at a price of several thousand dollars per board. Applied Micro is now offering their X-Gene based XC-1 development board to individual developers for $895, or about ~40% discount to the $1495 company now have to pay for the board. It may also be available from distributors (part number: EV-883208-X1-PRB-1).

XC-1 Development Board

XC-1 board (codenamed Mustang) technical specifications:

  • SoC – Applied Micro X-GeneAPM883208-X1 8-core ARM 64-bit @ 1.6 GHz
  • System Memory – 2x DDR3 UDIMM memory slots up fitted with 2x 4GB sticks (8 GB), upgradable to 16GB
  • Storage – 1x 128Mbit SPI NOR Flash for booting, 1x SATA 3 ports, SD card slot, 1024Kb and 256Kb I2C EEPROM
  • Connectivity – 2x Gigagit port (SGMII), 10 GbE SFP+ cage, 1x Gigabit management Ethernet port (RGMII).  Note: the product brief only mentions 1x Gigabit Ethernet port,  1x Management port, but the Getting Started Guide and the picture above clearly shows all 4 Ethernet ports.
  • USB – 2x USB 3.0 ports, 1x mini USB port (for JTAG)
  • Expansion – 1x PCIe x8 connector, expansion connector(s) for GPIOs
  • Debugging – JTAG (mini USB to JUAG) and trace connectors
  • Monitoring – DB9 Serial port
  • Misc – RTC, temperature monitor, BMC connector (I’m not sure what it is, and its purpose)
  • Power Supply – mini-ATX
  • Dimensions – 170 x 170 mm (mini-ITX form factor)

The kit includes X-Gene X-C1 board, a mini ITX Power Supply, a serial/USB FDTI cable, and documentation. I understand you can connect a SATA multiplier to get up to four 6TB hard drives connected to the board.

Mustang Block Diagram (USB ports should be USB 3.0)

You’ll also be able to access Linux code (source and binary),  U-Boot firmware (source and binary), Linux development tools, sample application code, and schematics and layout files for X-C1 board. UEFI Tianocore bootloader, as well as Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, RedHat, Fedora, OpenSUSE are also available. Download links are apparently provided in the documentation that comes with the board, or you may be able to access these after registration at https://myapm.apm.com/.

This server board is not only capable of running Linux server distributions, and you can insert a PCIe graphics card (e.g. Nvidia GeForce 7600) in to the board, and Android 4.4 Kitkat developed by Linaro, as shown on a video by Charbax, which also includes an overview of the board, and an unboxing of the kit.

Via ARMDevices.net

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13 Replies to “Applied Micro XC-1 Server Development Board (Mustang) is Now Available to Developers for $895”

  1. It doesn’t inspire confidence when the Applied Micro website refers to “ARM-V8” cores instead of “ARMv8” and the diagram shows “12C” instead of “I2C” (or even “I²C”). Someone please educate their sales people.

  2. @Ray Knight
    That’s my understanding that the two slots are populated with two 4GB RAM sticks in the kit.

    @Ian Tester
    You are right, there are too many mistakes and omissions on their marketing materials: only 2 Ethernet ports instead of 4, USB 2.0 instead of USB 3.0 and so on.

  3. Yes, well, maybe I’d buy one, especially as it’s Mini-ITX and I’ve got a case waiting for it… but apparently, I can’t qualify. Never mind that I’m a U-Boot project member; my fault is to not reside in the USA — they’ll only allow US residents to register and get the developer rebate. :/

  4. @Albert ARIBAUD
    I haven’t checked the details. But If they don’t actually mind about US residency, and the only issue if having a US mailing address, you could always use something like http://www.myus.com/.

    They’ll ship to the US, and forward to your country. The price would even be higher, with fee, shipping outside the US, and most likely custom fees.

  5. @cnxsoft
    Actually on the X-C1 products page, just below the limited time offer, APM direcst non-US visitors to AVNET’s site for a quote. I happen to live near enough an AVNET local branch office, so I’l try and ask them if the dev offer is applicable through them.

  6. @cnxsoft

    > Misc – RTC, temperature monitor, BMC connector (I’m not sure what it is, and its purpose)

    It’s probably a “Baseboard Management Connector”. It provides hands-off server management functions: power control, IPMI (reboot), BIOS access, console access, and so on.

  7. @cnxsoft
    Just for the record, I decided to go through myus.com, because even with the account setup fees, the re-shipping costs and the customs and taxes, I still ended up paying much less than I would have the French distributor — we’re talking 40%-ish less.

    Now, on to tinkering…

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