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Posts Tagged ‘ros’

CrazyPi Board Runs Ubuntu and ROS on Rockchip RK3128 SoC for Robotics & IoT Projects (Crowdfunding)

August 10th, 2017 4 comments

CrazyPi is a maker board powered by Rockchip RK3128 quad core Cortex A7 processor that can take various magnetically connected modules such as LIDAR, gimbal, 4G LTE, etc.., and runs both Ubuntu and ROS (Robot Operating System) for DIY robotics & IoT projects.

Click to Enlarge

CrazyPi main board specifications:

  • SoC – Rockchip RK3128 quad core Cortex A7 processor @ 1.2 GHz with ARM Mali GPU
  • MCU – ARM Cortex-M3 @ 72 MHz
  • System Memory – 1GB DDR3L @ 1066 MHz
  • Storage – 16GB eMMC flash pre-loaded with Ubuntu and ROS
  • Connectivity – 802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi @ 150 Mbps, Bluetooth 4.0
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port
  • Expansion Headers – Two headers with a total of 36-pin exposing 1x HDMI, 1x speaker, 1x microphone, 3x PWM, 1x I2C, 1x UART, 1x SPDIF, 1x SPI, 1x USB
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port ?
  • Dimensions – Smaller than credit card

The full details are not available yet, but the company claims CrazyPi is “completely open source and DIY”, so I’d assume more details will eventually show up on CrazyPi github repo (now empty). A cloud service also allows you to stream the webcam output from anywhere in the world.

Webcam View and Map Generated from CrazyPi Robot Kit

What’s  quite interesting is that the board is designed to be connected to add-on boards, modules and accessories allowing you to build robots:

  • Robotic shield board to control motors / servos
  • Media shield board for HDMI output and use the board as a mini computer
  • 4G LTE module (maybe part of the robotic shield board?)
  • Crazyou 4K LIDAR sensor with SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) function to automatically create map of your environment
  • 720p camera module
  • 2-degrees gimbal
  • 4-wheel robot chassis
  • 2x 18650 batteries and case

Again, we don’t have the exact details for each, but the promo video explains what can be done with the kits.

Crazyou – that’s the name of the company – has launched the project on Kickstarter to fund mass production with a 200,000 HKD goal (around $25,800). The board is supposed to cost $29, but is not offered standalone in the crowdfunding campaign, so instead you could start with a $59 CrazyPi Media Kit with the mainboard, camera and media board. If you want the complete robot shown above, you’d have to pledge $466 for the CrazyPi Advanced Kit reward with the camera module, the mainboard, the gimbal, the robotic shield board, battery case and charger, the chassis, and LIDAR. Various bundles are available to match different projects’ requirements. Shipping to most countries adds around $19, and delivery is scheduled for October 2017. There’s not much to see on Crazyou website, but eventually more details may emerge there.

Thanks to Freire for the tip.

Husarion CORE2 STM32 Board for Robotics Projects Works with ESP32, Raspberry Pi 3, or ASUS Tinkerboard

June 30th, 2017 No comments

Husarion CORE2 is a board designed to make robotics projects simpler and faster to complete with pre-configured software and online management. Projects can start using LEGOs, before moving to 3D printed or laser-cut version of the mechanical parts without having to spend too much time on the electronics and software part of the project.

CORE2 and CORE2-ROS Boards – Click to Enlarge

Two versions of the board are available: CORE2 combining STM32 MCU with ESP32 WiFI & Bluetooth module, and CORE2-ROS with STM32 instead coupled to a Raspberry Pi 3 or ASUS Tinkerboard running ROS (Robot Operating System). Both solutions share most of the same specifications:

  • MCU -STMicro STM32F4 ARM CORTEX-M4 MCU @ 168 MHz with 192 kB RAM, 1 MB Flash
  • External Storage – 1x micro SD slot
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 host port with 1A charging capability; 1x micro USB port for debugging and programming via FTDI chip
  • Expansion Headers
    • hRPi expansion header for
      • CORE2-ROS –  a single board computer Raspberry Pi 3 or ASUS Tinker Board
      • CORE2 – an ESP32 based Wi-Fi module
    • 2x motor headers (hMot) with
      • 4x DC motor outputs with built-in H-bridges
      • 4x quadrature encoder inputs 1 A cont./ 2 A max. current per output (2 A/4 A current when paralleled)
    • 6x servo ports with selectable supply voltage (5 / 6 / 7.4 / 8.6 V) 3 A cont./4.5 A max. current for all servos together
    • 6x 6-pin hSens sensor ports with GPIOs, ADC/ext. interrupt, I2C/UART, 5 V out
    • 1x hExt extension port with 12x GPIO, 7x ADC, SPI, I2C, UART, 2 x external interrupts
    • 1x CAN interface with onboard transceiver
  • Debugging – DBG SWD (Serial Wire Debug) STM32F4 debug port; micro USB port for serial console
  • Misc – 5x LEDs, 2x buttons
  • Power Supply – 6 to 16V DC with built-in overcurrent, overvoltage, and reverse polarity protection
  • Dimensions – 94 x 85 mm

On the software side, Husarion provide a set of open source libraries for robots as part of their hFramework, using DMA channels and interrupts internally to handle communication interfaces. The company has also prepared tutorials dealing with ROS introduction, creating nodes, simple kinematics for mobile robot, visual object recognition, running ROS on multiple machines, and SLAM navigation. CORE2 board can also be programming using the Arduino IDE, and finally Husarion Cloud allows you to securely create a web user interface to control the robot, and even program the robot firmware from a web browser.

That means you can program your robot using either the Web IDE, or offline with an SDK plus Visual Studio Code and the Husarion extension. The development work flow is summarized above.

CORE2 boards can be used for a variety of projects such as robotic arms, telepresense robots, 3D printers, education robots, drones, exoskeletons, and so on. If you want to learn about robots, but don’t have LEGO Mindstorms and don’t feel comfortable making your own mechanical parts yet, ROSbot might be a good way to start with CORE2-ROS board, LiDAR, a camera, four DC motors with encoders, an orientation sensor (MPU9250), four distance sensors, a Li-Ion battery (3 x 18650 batteries) and a charger, as well as aluminum mechanics. It also happens to be the platform they use for their tutorials.

ROSbot

You’ll find all those items, and some extra add-on boards, on the CrowdSupply campaign, starting at $89 for CORE2 board with ESP32 module, $99 for CORE2-ROS board without SBC, and going up to $1,290 for the complete ROSbot with ASUS Tinker Board. Shipping is free to the US, and $8 to $20 depending on the selected rewards, with delivery scheduled for September 2017, except for ROSbot that’s planned for mid-October 2017.

$80 BeagleBone Blue Board Targets Robots & Drones, Robotics Education

March 14th, 2017 3 comments

Last year, we reported that BeagleBoard.org was working with the University of California San Diego on BeagleBone Blue board for robotics educational kits such as EduMiP self-balancing robot, and EduRover four wheel robot. The board has finally launched, so we know the full details, and it can be purchased for about $80 on Mouser, Element14 or Arrow websites.

Click to Enlarge

BeagleBone Blue specifications:

  • SiP (System-in-Package) – Octavo Systems OSD3358 with TI Sitara AM3358 ARM Cortex-A8 processor @ up to 1 GHz,  2×32-bit 200-MHz programmable real-time units (PRUs), PowerVR SGX530 GPU, PMIC, and 512MB DDR3
  • Storage – 4GB eMMC flash, micro SD slot
  • Connectivity – WiFi 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.1 LE (TI Wilink 8) with two antennas
  • USB – 1x USB 2.0 client and host port
  • Sensors – 9 axis IMU, barometer
  • Expansion
    • Motor control – 8x 6V servo out, 4x DC motor out, 4x quadrature encoder in
    • Other interfaces – GPIOs, 5x UARTs, 2x SPI, 1x I2C, 4x ADC, CAN bus
  • Misc – Power, reset and 2x user buttons; power, battery level & charger LEDs; 6x user LEDs; boot select switch
  • Power Supply – 9-18V DC input via power barrel; 5V via micro USB port; 2-cell LiPo support with balancing,
  • Dimensions & Weight – TBD

The board ships pre-loaded with Debian, but it also supports the Robot Operating System (ROS) & Ardupilot, as well as graphical programming via Cloud9 IDE on Node.js. You’ll find more details, such as documentation, hardware design files, and examples projects on BeagleBone Blue product page, and github.

The board is formally launched at Embedded World 2017, and Jason Kridner, Open Platforms Technologist/Evangelist at Texas Instruments, and co-founder and board member at BeagleBoard.org Foundation, uploaded a video starting with a demo of various robotics and UAV projects, before giving a presentation & demo of the board at the 2:10 mark using Cloud 9 IDE.


If you attend Embedded World 2017, you should be able to check out of the board and demos at Hall 3A Booth 219a.

Parrot S.L.A.M Dunk is a Ubuntu & ROS Computer with 3D Depth Cameras for Drones & Robots

September 26th, 2016 No comments

Parrot and Canonical have partnered to develop the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk development kit for the design of applications for autonomous navigation, obstacle avoidance, indoor navigation and 3D mapping for drones and robots, and running both Ubuntu 14.04 and ROS operating systems. The name of the kit is derived from its “Simultaneous Localization and Mapping algorithm” (S.L.A.M) allowing for location without GPS signal.

parrot-slam-dunk

Parrot S.L.A.M Dunk preliminary specifications:

  • SoC – NVIDIA Tegra K1 processor
  • Camera – Fish-eye stereo camera with a 1500×1500 resolution at 60fps
  • Sensors – Inertial-measurement unit (IMU), ultrasound sensor up to 15 meters range, magnetometer, barometer
  • Video Output – micro HDMI
  • USB – 1x micro USB 2.0 port, 1x USB 3.0/2.0 port
  • Weight – 140 grams

Parrot S.L.A.M dunk can be fitted various drones and robotic platforms such as quadcopters and fixed-wings, rolling robots and articulated arms using mounting kits. The computer module is then connected to the host platform via a 3.5mm jack cable and a USB cable in order to send and receive commands and data.

parrot-slam-dunk-drone-3d-depthThis morning I wrote about SoftKinetic 3D sensing camera based on time-of-flight technology, but Parrot S.L.A.M Dunk is based on more commonly used stereo vision cameras. The micro HDMI allows developers to connect the computer to a monitor in order to develop their application for Ubuntu and ROS.

Parrot S.L.A.M Dunk will be available in Q4 2016 at an undisclosed price. More information should eventually be found in Parrot Developer website.

Intel Unveils Joule Compute Module and Devkit for IoT based on Atom T5500 & T5700 Processors

August 17th, 2016 8 comments

As the Intel Developer Forum 2016 is now taking place in San Francisco, Intel has unveiled the Joule Compute Module and development kit targeting IoT applications. The module is not for low cost and low power sensor nodes however, as it features a powerful quad core Atom processor running at 1.5+ GHz, so it more suited to IoT gateways, or other application requiring lots of processing power to handle sensor data.

Intel-JouleTwo models of the Joule module have been introduced:

  • Intel Joule 570x platform
    • SoC – Intel Atom T5700 64-bit quad-core processor @ 1.7 GHz / 2.4 GHz (Burst frequency) with Intel HD Graphics with 4K video capture and display
    • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR4 RAM
    • Storage – 16GB eMMC memory
    • Connectivity – 802.11ac Wi-Fi with MIMO and Bluetooth 4.1
    • Other interfaces –  USB 3.0, MPI CSI and DSI interfaces, and multiple GPIO, I2C, UART interfaces
  • Intel Joule 550x platform
    • SoC – Intel Atom T5500 64-bit quad-core processor @ 1.5 GHz with Intel HD Graphics with 4K video capture and display
    • System Memory – 3GB LPDDR4 RAM
    • Storage – 8GB eMMC memory
    • Connectivity – 802.11ac Wi-Fi with MIMO and Bluetooth 4.1
    • Other interfaces –  USB 3.0, MPI CSI and DSI interfaces, and multiple GPIO, I2C, UART interfaces

Both modules run Ostro Linux-based OS – built with the Yocto Project – tailored for IoT and smart devices, and support Intel RealSense cameras and libraries. Intel also mentions that “Developers can choose to develop on Ubuntu/Ubuntu Core (Snappy) or Microsoft Windows 10 IoT Core”.

The modules are already used to develop several products and demos including PivotHead smart glasses used by Airbus for quality control, Vstone bartending robot featuring a RealSense camera to track a person’s face, Eyelights highway patrol motorcycle helmet display used to read license plates, Microsoft Bamboo robotic companion to help parents of children with diabetes, Canonical robots to demonstrate Ubuntu Core and the Robot Operating System (ROS), as well as Gumstix custom carrier boards for Joule Compute Module.

Intel_Joule_570x_Development_Board

Intel will offer a developer kit for each version of the Joule module, but currently on Joule 570x developer kit can be purchased through partners such as Mouser and Newegg for $370, and Joule 550x devkit will be launched on Q4 2016.

Joule 570x devkit specifications:

  • Joule module based on Intel Atom T5700 processor with 4GB RAM (PoP), 16GB storage, 2x 100-pin connectors
  • Storage – micro SD slot
  • Video Output – micro HDMI port
  • USB – 1 x USB 3.0 port, 1x USB 3.0 type C OTG port
  • Camera – 2x 4-Lane MIPI CSI Connectors
  • Expansion – 2x 40 pin females header with 3.3V (5V tolerant) signals for I2S, digital microphone, PCIe, I2C, RTC, SPI, SDIO, UART, PWM, GPIOs, MIPI DSI…
  • Debugging – 1x micro USB port for serial console
  • Power – 12V via Power barrel
  • Dimensions – Joule module: 48 x 24mm

Beside the board and module, the kit includes a micro-SD card, a type-A to type-C micro USB cable, two Wi-Fi antennas, and a heatsink and fastener. The board will run Ostro OS with Linux 4.4 and application framework for Node.js, Python, and C/C++ applications. The “BIOS” will be an open source UEFI implementation. Software development tools include Intel XDK IoT Edition and Intel System Studio IoT Edition, Intel RealSense API support, and Intel IoT Developer Kit.

While you can get the devkit right now, Intel Joule 570x and 550x platforms will only become broadly available in Q4 2016 at an undisclosed price. They will be available is over 100 countries by the end of Q4 including the United States, Canada, Japan and most of Europe. More details can be found on Intel Joule IDF page.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot Features Nvidia Jetson TK1 Board, a 3D Camera, and More

January 25th, 2016 No comments

Autonomous, a US company that makes smart products such as smart desks, virtual reality kits and autonomous robots, has recently introduced a deep learning robot that comes with a 3D camera, speaker and microphone, Jetson TK1 board, and a mobile base.

Autonomous_Deep_Learning_Robot

The robot appears to be mostly made of the shelves parts:

  • 3D Depth camera – Asus Xtion Pro 3D Depth Camera
  • Speaker & Microphone
  • Nvidia Jetson TK1 PM375 board – Nvidia Terra K1 quad-core Cortex A15 processor @ 2.3 GHz with a 192-core Kepler GPU, 2GB RAM, 16 GB flash
  • Kobuki Mobile Base –  Kobuki is the best mobile base designed for education and research on state of the art robotics. Kobuki provides power supplies for external computer power as well as additional sensors and actuators. Its highly accurate odometry, amended by calibrated gyroscope, enables precise navigation.

The robot is designed for research in deep learning and mobile robotics, and comes with Ubuntu, Caffe, Torch, Theano, cuDNN v2, and CUDA 7.0, as Robot Operating System (ROS) set of open source software libraries and tools.

Kobuki Base

Kobuki Base

While there’s virtually no documentation at all on the product page, I’ve been told that the robot was built on top of TurtleBot open source robot, and re-directed to tutorials available via TurtleBot Wiki, as well useful resources for deep learnings frameworks such as Caffe and Torch, and Google TensorFlow Tutorials.

Autonomous Deep Learning Robot sells for $999 with manual charging, or $1048 with a self-charging dock.

Thanks to Nanik for the tip!

BeagleBone Blue Board is Designed for Robots and UAVs

January 13th, 2016 2 comments

Beagleboard.org organization already tried to go Blue with BeagleBone BlueSteel-Basic that was supposed to a the single board computer to be used by OEM to integrate into their design instead of BeagleBone Black development board. For some unknown reasons this never happened, but they’ve now reused the color to introduce BeagleBone Blue board designed for robotics and UAVs.

BeagleBone_Blue

BeagleBone Black with Robotics Cape (BeagleBone Blue picture is not available)

BeagleBone Blue specifications:

  • SoC – Texas Instruments Sitara AM3358 Cortex A8 @ 1 GHz + PowerVR SGX530 GPU
  • System Memory – 512 MB DDR3
  • Storage – 4 GB 8-bit on-board flash storage
  • Connectivity – 802.11 b/g/n, Bluetooth 4.0 LE
  • USB – USB 2.0 client and host
  • Motor Control – 8x 6V servo out, 4x DC motor out, 4x quad enc in
  • Sensors – 9 axis IMU, barometer
  • “Easy connect Interfaces” – GPS, DSM2 radio, UARTs, SPI, I2C, analog, buttons, LEDs
  • Power / Battery – 2-cell LiPo support with balancing, 6-16V charger input
  • Dimensions – N/A

The board is still in development, and the only picture I have is the one of the PCB layout.

BeagleBone_Blue_PCB_LayoutThe project was born thanks to a collaboration between Beagleboard.org and University of California San Diego, as they currently use a BeagleBone Black with a Robotics cape as shown in the first picture of this post for their robotics educational kits, and started to create a single board computer for this project.

The BeagleBone Blue will be software compatible with BeagleBone Black and support Debian, Ubuntu Snappy, ROS, Ardupilot, Machinekit, etc.. as well as Cloud9 graphics IDE on Node.js, among others.  The kits shown in the video are EduMiP self-balancing robot, EduRover four wheel robot, and there will be a third kit called EduMAV, which I guess should be a “Miniature UAV”, e.g. a mini drone/quadcopter.

There’s currently no information on availability and pricing. Further details will be posted on BeagleBone Blue page as the project progresses.

Via @TXInstruments.

 

Gumstix Announces Solution Kits for their CPU Modules and Boards

November 20th, 2013 2 comments

Gumstix has recently unveiled several solution kits featuring their Overo and DuoVero Computer-on-Modules (CoMs), Pepper single board computer, and several expansions boards, together with required accessories, and software packages, in order to help their customers getting started more easily. All these solutions are based on Texas Instruments OMAP3, OMAP4, and/or Sitara processors, and run Linux (Ubuntu or Yocto), and sometimes Android for the kits with displays.

Robotics Kit

Robotics Development Kit

The solutions kits target 6 different types of applications and/or markets:

  • Robotics
    • Robotic Development Kit (Pictured above) with one Overo AirSTORM CoM (OMAP3703), and RoboVero expansion board. The kit is better suited for motor control applications.
    • Mobile Robotic Development Kit with one Overo AirSTORM CoM, and Turtlecore expansion board to be used with iRobot Create.

    The kits ship with a Linaro (Ubuntu for Overo) system card and Robot Operating System (ROS) pre-installed.

  • Handhelds
    • 3.5″ Handheld Development Kit featuring Overo AirSTORM CoM with Alto35 cutomizable LCD touchscreen.
    • 4.3″ Handheld Development Kit with Pepper SBC and a 4.3″ LCD touchscreen

    Both kits provide Wi-Fi/Bluetooth connectivity, and Pepper SBC support Yocto Project Linux or Android , and the kit with the Overo CoM support Ubuntu, with Android coming soon.

  • Network Appliances (for IoT)
    • Barebones Wireless Appliance Development Kit with Overo AirSTORM CoM and Alcatraz Breakout board which provides access to 140 signals and 802.11 b/g Wi-Fi.
    • Overo Network pack featuring Overo Water CoM and Tobi expansion board to provide DVI display, 10/100baseT Ethernet, USB Host, USB OTG, USB console and Stereo Audio.

    Both kits support Linux (Ubuntu or built with Yocto).

  • Digital Signage
    • Home Theater Demonstration Kit with DuoVero Zephyr CoM (OMAP4) and an HTPC expansion board to provide an HDMI connector. From the website, it’s not very is the micro SD card is pre-loaded with Yocto Linux, XBMC, or an XBMC image built with Yocto.
  • Remote Data Collection
    • Barebones Remote Data Collection Development Kit featuring Overo TidalSTORM CoM (OMAP3730) and PintoTH expansion board providing access to USB OTG, 3.3V supply and level shifters.
    • Overo EVM pack with Overo Fire CoM (OMAP3530), Chestnut43 expansion board (LCD Touchscreen, Ethernet, USB host and Stereo Audio), and a 4.3″ touchscreen LCD display.
    • Remote Data Collection Development Kit featuring Overo TidalSTORM CoM and Tobi expansion board.

    All 3 kits ship with an SD card pre-loaded with Ubuntu (Linaro)

  • Education
    • Overo Summit Pack featuring an Overo Earth CoM (OMAP3503), and Summit expansion board to provide DVI display, USB Host, USB OTG, USB console and Stereo Audio. This kit apparently ships with 2GB? micro SD pre-loaded with Ubuntu Linaro. I’m not quite sure how it relates to education more than the other kits.
Overo EVM Pack, One of the Remote Data Collection Kits.

Overo EVM Pack, One of the Remote Data Collection Kits.

I’ve only listed the main parts of the kits. i.e. CoM, expansion board, and display if any,  but all kits also come with power adapters, a bootable microSD or SD card and relevant cables. More kits will be added over time.

The kits are available now for prices ranging from $189 to $422. More information is available on Gumstix’s Development Kits page.