Solu Touch-Enabled Portable mini PC Runs a Cloud-linked OS on Nvidia Tegra K1 (Crowdfunding)

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Solu Machines, has startup based in Finland, as decided to re-invent the computing experience. To achieve this they’ve created a battery powered mini PC based on Nvidia Tegra K1 processor and 4GB RAM, included a touch screen on the top cover that can be used as a tablet on the go, and as a touchpad when connected to a monitor, while creating a new OS called SoluOS with a new type of user interface and that stores lots of the data in the cloud, yet allows the device to run offline, and there’s more…

Solu_mini_PCSolu mini PC specifications:

  • SoC –  Nvidia Tegra K1 4-Plus-1 ARM Cortex-A15 CPU @ 2.3GHz with 192-core Kepler GPU
  • System Memory – 4GB LPDDR3
  • Storage – 32GB “cache capacity”
  • Display – 1440 x 1440, 450ppi, with an edge-to-edge touch
  • Video Output  – Support for up to 4K monitors apparently via USB type-C connector
  • Connectivity – Dual-band 2×2 MIMO WiFi (802.11a/b/g/n), Bluetooth 4.0
  • Battery – 1200mAh
  • Dimensions – 102 x 102 x 13mm

Solu_InterfaceWhat you see above is the “home screen” or “desktop” however you want to call for SoluOS, which looks quite different from the usual list of icons we see on most platforms. Solu is also designed for collaboration, and multiple users can work on the same file using a “Causal Tree” technique.

SoluOS operating systems is based on Linux, and works with SoluCloud which offers up to 5TB or more storage in the cloud, as well as unlimited access to apps, including Android apps. This is achieved via a monthly fee used to support the Cloud, and pay app developer a share of the profit based on usage.

Solu_Subscription_packageYou can pay as low as $1 per year, but you won’t have access to Cloud Storage for your own data, while $19 per month will give you access to 2TB+ cloud storage, and all apps in the system, while a $49 monthly fees to targetting businesses with unlimited phone support, 5TB+ storage and some other features. The company is also said to work on a free subscription plan, although $1 per year is already close to free…

Solu project is now on Kickstarter and it’s surprisingly popular having nearly reached their 200,000 Euros funding target with about 185,000 Euros raised so far. The early bird rewards are gone, but you can still pledge 349 Euros ($384 US) to get a Solu mini PC with a charger and three month subscription. Solu will only ship to North America and Europe for 20 Euros, and delivery is scheduled for May 2016. You can also visit Solu.co for more pictures and details.

Via Linux.com

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TLScnxsoftSolu is a touchscreen, cloud-connected mini PC for use at home and on the go (crowdfunding) - Liliputingjorgeade Recent comment authors
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Fossxplorer
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Fossxplorer

Too expensive really.

ade
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ade

@Fossxplorer
I agree. The whole approach is interesting (integration between custom Linux OS and cloud-based service), but price is really too expensive IMO. Much more expensive than a shield TV (with tegra X1) and Jetson TK1 (with much more I/O). About the same price than the much-more-portable Shield tablet (that can run not only android but also native linux/ubuntu with all HW acceleration for opengl4.4, etc. http://forum.xda-developers.com/shield-tablet/development/running-ubuntu-natively-shield-tablet-t2985238/post57775988 )

jorge
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jorge

I was wondering how a company as Solu machines can design a board with a tegra x1. I mean, there is no demo board, no available info… what are the steps to be done if I wished to develop a board with this cpu?

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TLS
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TLS

@jorge They most likely didn’t, despite what the Kickstarter says. They most likely worked with http://www.bittium.com/ (formerly ElectroBit) or someone like that. Finding a hardware development company isn’t that hard, but it’s costly. The company I linked to are based in Finland and have done a lot of Intel reference designs for mobile products in the past, so a Tegra solution would be a piece of cake for them.