Onyx Boox Poke2 Color eReader Launched for $299

Manga and comics fans, rejoice! After years of getting black & white eReaders, the first commercial color eReaders are coming to market starting with Onyx Boox Poke2 Color eReader sold for $299 (but sadly sold out at the time of writing).

The eReader comes with a 6-inch, 1448 x 1072 E-Ink display that supports up to 4096 colors, and runs Android 9.0 on an octa-core processor coupled with 2GB RAM and 32GB storage.

Onyx Boox Poke2 Color eReader specifications:

  • SoC – Unnamed octa-core processor @ up to 2.0 GHz (possibly Snapdragon 625)
  • System Memory – 2GB RAM
  • Storage – 32GB eMMC flash
  • Display – 6-inch 4096-color e-Ink display with 1448 x 1072 resolution (B&W: 300PPI, color: 100PPI) with finger touch support (e.g. stylus not supported), with 32-level adjustable color temperature (CTM)
  • Connectivity – Dual-band 802.11 b/g/n WiFi 4 and Bluetooth 4.1
  • USB – Micro USB OTG port
  • Misc – Power Key
  • Battery – 1,500 mAh charged through the Micro USB port
  • Dimensions – 153×107×6.8mm
  • Weight – 150 grams

The device relies on E-ink Kaleido technology to render up to 4096 colors, while some cheaper color e-paper displays can support up to 7 colors using E-ink “Advanced Color ePaper (ACeP)”. There’s a trade-off when reading content in color, however. While the display shows 300 pixels per inch when looking at black and white text/images, it goes down to around 100 pixels per inch in color mode.

Onyx does not mention typical battery life, but since e-Paper display only consumes power when the display is refreshed, the eReader should last for a few weeks on a charge. E-Paper displays are also easier on the eyes, designed to be read using ambient lighting, although an adjustable light is included to read books in darker environments.

Via Liliputing and The Digital Reader

Jean-Luc started CNX Software in 2010 as a part-time endeavor, before quitting his job as a software engineering manager, and starting to write daily news, and reviews full time later in 2011.

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geokon
1 month ago

Why do people still use micro USB? In cellphone it seems to be for product differentiation – to push consumers to buy the more expensive version. Or maybe so the device/port breaks and you have to buy a new one. But in this case it’s their only color option. And all their other tablets seem to use USB-C

Is there some good reason for micro?

willy
willy
1 month ago

It’s just like the transition from mini- to micro-. At some point, everyone had mini and half users had micro. When some vendors tried to widen their market by using mini, some users were astonished that the migration hadn’t yet been done. But the truth is that for most end users, micro-USB cables are lying everywhere on desks, behind TVs and wherever you have a small USB battery, flashlight, smart watch etc, while USB-C cables are still only hanging at places where you put your smartphone on charge, and once it’s on charge you have no other one available. So… Read more »

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