Home > Hardware, TI MSP430, Video > TI Innovator Hub Connects MSP432 LaunchPad Board to TI Graphing Calculators

TI Innovator Hub Connects MSP432 LaunchPad Board to TI Graphing Calculators

I remember when I was in high school we all had those TI calculators to cheat enhance our chances of passing exams, but Texas Instruments has now launched what it calls TI-Innovator Hub based on a MSP432 LaunchPad board that connects to some of their graphing calculators and allows student to program and control external hardware through their calculators.

TI-Innovator-HubInnovator Hub hardware specifications:

  • MSP-EXP432P401-ET TI LaunchPad Board
  • 3x input ports, 3x output ports, I²C port
  • Breadboard connector with 20 labeled pins
  • USB
    • Mini USB Port (DATA port for connection to a TI graphing calculator, or a computer running TI-Nspire CX software)
    • Micro-USB port (POWER port to connect to external power source)
  • Misc – Red LED, RGB LED, Light Brightness Sensor, and speaker
  • Enclosure

The hub can then be programmed using TI-84 Plus CE (TI Basic language) or TI-Nspire CX (Lua language) graphing calculators. It’s a bit like playing with Arduino board, but instead of using a computer for programming, you can use a calculator. TI also provides resources to make it easier for teachers. Some extra accessories are also available include I/O Module Pack with sensors and motors, an ultrasonic ranger module, a breadboard pack, and an external battery.

You can watch the “cool box” & “mind blown” video to see what students think about it.

I could not find pricing information. You’ll find a few more details on TI Innovator Hub product page.

Via Electronics Weekly.

  1. Someone
    January 13th, 2017 at 20:54 | #1

    Why should I use a calculator when I have a much more powerful and programmable smartphone?

    • nobitakun
      January 14th, 2017 at 00:55 | #2

      Because teachers does not allow the use of smartphones in exams, but they let you use calculators?

      I think it’s a logic answer, at least inside the schools I studied. I’ve finished computing and theoric exams were like in any other major exam, pen and calculator if needed, even programming ones. Stuff like tablets or smartphones were utterly forbidden.

  2. January 14th, 2017 at 10:02 | #3

    @Someone
    Some parents also don’t like to buy smartphones for their kids. I know some kids who had to wait until being 15 years old before their parents would get them a phone.

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