Qualcomm Starts Sampling of Qualcomm Centriq 2400 ARM Server SoC with Up to 48 ARMv8 Cores

Qualcomm has announced commercial sampling of Qualcomm Centriq 2400 series server SoC built with 10nm FinFET process technology and featuring up to 48 Qualcomm Falkor custom ARMv8 CPU cores “highly optimized to both high performance and power efficiency, and designed to tackle the most common datacenter workloads”.

qualcomm-centriq-2400-series-soc

Qualcomm Datacenter Technologies demonstrated the new processor in a Live demo showing Apache, Spark, Java, and Hadoop on Linux running on a SBSA compliant server powered by Qualcomm Centriq 2400 processor, but the company did not provide any further technical details or preliminary benchmark results for the solution.

The Qualcomm Centriq 2400 processor series is now sampling to select customers and is expected to be commercially available in H2 2017. That’s about all we know from the press release. However, Linaro have been working on Qualcomm Technologies QDF2432 based board for several months with support for Debian 8.x ‘Jessie’ and CentOS 7 operating systems, as well as Hadoop and OpenStack. It’s not 100% clear if this is indeed related to Centriq 2400, albeit the name QDF2432 seems to indicate so, and it would probably have started on some FPGA board to simulate Centriq 2400 (32-core?) processor, unless they had engineering samples for nearly a year. There’s also a basically empty page on Centos.org for “Qualcomm QDF2432 Server Dev Platform”. It’s close to impossible to find much details since those things are developed under NDAs.

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blu
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blu

Let’s hope that will change the situation with the availability of public aarch64 clouds for the better.

JotaMG
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JotaMG

“They” are coming… 😉
http://www.tomshardware.com/news/qualcomm-x86-emulation-windows-10,33152.html

” If Microsoft could somehow make x86 apps work on ARM chips well enough, then ARM chipmakers would suddenly be able to build notebooks that are competitive in every way to the Intel-based ones. The ARM-based notebooks would probably have to start at the lower end of the spectrum, but that also happens to include a big portion of the market. “

hex
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hex

@JotaMG
no way!