Intrinsyc Launches Open-Q 660 HDK Snapdragon 660 Development Kit

Orange Pi Development Boards

For many years now, Intrinsyc has been releasing Qualcomm mobile development platforms that that are used by companies wanting to design and manufacture smartphones or other products based on Snapdragon processors. Those are usually full featured, including a smartphone display, and well suited to such product development.

Their latest development kit is the Open-Q 600 HDK (Hardware Development Kit) powered by Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 SoC, an upgrade to Snapdragon 653 with about 20 percent improvement in CPU performance, and 30 percent in GPU performance. The kit is also equipped with 6GB RAM, 64GB flash, a display, wireless modules, sensors, camera interfaces, expansion headers, and more.

Intrinsyc Open-Q 600 specifications:

  • SoC – Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 octa-core processor with
    • Four Kryo 260 performance cores @ up to 2.2GHz, four Kryo 260 low power cores @ up to 1.8GHz
    • Adreno 512 GPU @ up to 650 MHz supporting OpenGL ES 3.0/3.2, Vulkan, DX12 FL 12, OpenCL 2.0 full profile
    • Hexagon 680 DSP with Hexagon Vector eXtensions (dual-HVX512) designed for 784 MHz
  • Memory – 6GB LPDDR4x
  • Storage – 64GB eMMC 5.1 flash (combined with LPDDR4x RAM in eMCP package), microSD slot
  • Display / Video Output
    • 2x 4-lane MIPI-DSI connector + touch panel support
    • Optional 5.7″  AMOLED display with 1920×1080 resolution, PCAP touch panel, via 4-lane MIPI DSI interface
    • DisplayPort 1.3 on USB 3.1 Type C port up to 2560×1600 (WQXGA) @ 60fps
  • Camera I/F
    • 3x 4-lane MIPI CSI interfaces with 3D camera support
    • Optional camera board with 2x rear-facing 13MP sensors (Samsung S5K3M2) and 1x front-facing 8MP sensor (OmniVision OV8856)
    • Dual 14-bit Qualcomm Spectra ISPwith support for: 16 + 16 MP, 540 MHz each; 24MP30 ZSL with dual ISP; 16 MP 30 ZSL with a single ISP
  • Video Support
    • Encode – 4K30 HEVC/H.264/VP8/MPEG4
    • Decode – 4K30 8-bit: H.264/VP8/VP9, 4K30 10-bit: HEVC
    • Concurrent – 1080p60 Decode + 1080p30 Encode
  • Audio – Qualcomm WCD9335 audio codec; audio expansion headers; 3.5mm ANC headset jack
  • Wireless Connectivity
    • Dual band (2.4/5GHz) 802.11 b/g/n/ac  1×1 MU-MIMO WiFi with MH4L antenna connector and PCB antenna
    • Bluetooth 5 BLE
    • GNSS  – GPS/GLONASS/COMPASS/Galileo via Qualcomm SDR660 GNSS receiver with PCB antenna and SMA connector option
    • 20-pin NFC expansion header
  • USB – 2x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB port (for debugging), 1x USB type C port
  • Expansion I/Os – I2S, SPI, GPIO, JTAG, 24-pin sensor I/O for optional STMicro sensor board
  • Battery – Optional 3,000 mAh Li-Ion battery
  • Power Supply – 12V/5A input from included wall adapter; Qualcomm Power and Battery Management (PM660 + PM660A + SMB1381)
  • Dimensions – 170 x 170mm (Mini-ITX form factor)
Click to Enlarge

The platform supports Android 7 Nougat, but there’s not too much public information about software support, except that “Users of the Open-Q 660 Development Kit will receive product documentation and access to complimentary tools and software updates, and additional technical support or product development assistance through Intrinsyc’s technical support services”.

The early adopter version of the kit can be pre-ordered for $999, not including optional display or camera board, which respectively add $210 and $250. The optional battery is not shown in the order page, all orders are subject to approval from the company, and kits should be shipped by the end of October. Visit the product page for additional information.

Via LinuxGizmos

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jim st
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jim st

When I worked for Qualcomm, we had to check these out for tests. The ones they had had a spot for the radios, and the PMIC was broken out. I’m guessing for these external models, you don’t play with these that much.

I wish they weren’t so damn expensive, would be cool to have one to play with.

I might mention that the debugger there was Lauterbach. Not sure what they support with this or the tool chain they release.

Tarwin
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Tarwin

That’s great. This is the first time I’ve seen any mention of a Qualcomm midrange chip supporting 10-bit hevc.

Nobody of Import
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Nobody of Import

They’re just damned expensive. Like jim st, I worked with some of these as target hardware when I was a build engineer at QUIC. Nice boards, really, but DAAAAaaamn…thousand dollars? I can work with NVidia’s parts for half or less of that and they’re roughly in the same classes. Sorry, but no.